Question of the Day: Do You Have The Right Carry Gun? (Send A Picture of Your Self-Defense Target!)

When it comes to choosing an everyday carry gun (EDC), there are a lot of variables: type of action, ease of concealment, reliability, ergonomics, caliber, recoil, style, cleaning ease and more. How do you know if you’re carrying the right gun? Gun guru David Kenik reckons you should carry a gun with which you can put a lot of rounds downrange quickly and accurately while on the move. Simple enough, right? So here’s the test . . .

Stand ten yards from a standard paper plate (8.5″ – 9″). Empty your gun as fast as you can while maintaining a modicum of accuracy. If you can move while shooting, do so. If not, not. Send a JPEG of your EDC sitting on the perforated plate to thetruthaboutguns@gmail.com. [Put PAPER PLATE in the subject bar.] Tell us whether or not you were static or moving when shooting, how many rounds you shot, and how many hit the plate. We’ll pick an entry at random and send the winner 200 rounds of 9mm or .45.

comments

  1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

    This past Summer, I set up my own dynamic course (that means moving while shooting) with “hostiles” mixed in with “friendlies”. I recorded video myself of my movement through the course and included closeup analysis of hits on the “hostiles” and “friendlies”. If I can find a simple way to capture one frame of that video showing one of the “hostiles”, I will send it. (I do not have any video editing software at this time.)

    For reference, I was shooting a full-size Smith and Wesson M&P 40 handgun loaded with 165 grain target rounds. I would like to think that my rate of fire and accuracy were good enough.

  2. avatar Aaron says:

    The plain English meaning of the words “keep” and “bear” clearly indicate a right to carry.

    Bear (verb) has many different definitions (carry, endure, support, give birth to, and proceed on a specific heading).

    “let an unelected bureaucrat decide on a subjective whim” is NOT one of the definitions of “bear”.

    1. avatar Alex Waits says:

      Reading Comprehension 😛

    2. avatar S.CROCK says:

      I read the title like that as well.

  3. avatar Vhyrus says:

    10 yards is 30 feet. I want you to measure out 30 feet when you get a chance, then I want you to come up with a plausible scenario where you would be legally justified in unloading on someone at that range outside of your home. You won’t come up with many. I train mostly at 10 feet, because that’s where the threat is going to be.

    1. avatar Rabbi says:

      While most self defense shootings happen at close distances, threats happen at all distances. I know of many shootings that have happened at distances well beyond 30 ft

      1. avatar Renner says:

        Someone shooting at me from 30 feet away would easily justify me returning fire.

    2. avatar ActionPhysicalMan says:

      Someone could shoot at you from 30+ feet, my crazy aunt for instance. It might be a good idea to not only seek cover but shoot back.

    3. avatar Chris. says:

      That’s pretty easy to Justify actually:

      “We have done some testing along those lines recently and have found that an average healthy adult male can cover the traditional seven yard distance in a time of (you guessed it) about one and one-half seconds. It would be safe to say then that an armed attacker at 21 feet is well within your Danger Zone. ”

      http://www.theppsc.org/Staff_Views/Tueller/How.Close.htm

    4. avatar kevin says:

      “Training” means: make it harder than it probably will be, so that you don’t flub it at showtime. Sure, it will “probably” be only 10′. But if you can hit at 30, you’ll do fine at 10′. If you only train at 10′, you’ll probably miss at 30′.

    5. avatar kevin says:

      “then I want you to come up with a plausible scenario where you would be legally justified in unloading on someone at that range outside of your home”

      Aurora movie theater shooting.

    6. It’s a question of marksmanship skill. If you have the chops to hit at 30 feet rapidly, you assuredly have the chops to hose at 10. Just because the scenario is less likely to arise doesn’t mean you shouldn’t train it. yeah it feels great to present fast and burn it down at 10′, but doesn’t mean you can do it at 10y, 15y or 25y.

      For someone who is preparing for the unlikely scenario of using a firearm to defend themselves it doesn’t seem a far stretch to be able to do it at all handgun distances, since they’re not mutually exclusive.

  4. avatar ActionPhysicalMan says:

    I wonder if I’d use the the 200 rounds of 9mm or .45 ammo in my 5.7 or my .357. I suppose that I may not have the right gun.

    1. avatar PeterW says:

      Maybe you can pull the .355″ projectiles from the 9mm and put them into .357 or .38 cases. Accuracy might suffer a little, though.

  5. avatar bLoving says:

    -snort-
    Yeah, but my EDC is a .357 SP101, I suppose we could settle for a few boxes of .22LR, I think we’d all agree that would be a prize worth winning!:-P

  6. avatar Roymond says:

    I’d go with some .22 mag — the stuff is ridiculously expensive here.

  7. avatar tdiinva (now in wisconsin) says:

    Each of my ranges sessions gets a heavy dosage of movement. The movement drill is head on advance from 15 yards; retreat beginning at 5 yards; repeat the drill from off angle on both sides; and finally move left, move right at 10-15 yards. On a good day with my HI Power I will put all 100 rounds on an 18″ x 24″ silouette target.

  8. avatar Ralph says:

    I used to be able to do shoot and move drills at the town range on Cape Cod. Now I’ve found it impossible to find a range where I can do anything but stand and deliver. Even rapid fire is frowned on.

    Still, I’ve learned that with a pistol, I can run and shoot or shoot and run and in both cases I’ll be on target, but I can’t shoot while running with any degree of accuracy. At all.

    1. avatar strych9 says:

      It’s for the children Ralph. You have to set an example.

      Running within an hour of shooting can make you sick.

  9. avatar Brian says:

    I just tried this at my local range. At 10 yards, the results were embarrassing! Slightly better at 7.

  10. avatar Roymond says:

    My standard carry piece is presently out of commission. Would my backup work? That could be interesting; I’ve never practiced shooting and moving with it!

  11. avatar Docduracoat says:

    I was amazed at how a laser makes it possible to shoot one handed and make hits while running away from A target
    There is only one range around here that allows you to draw from the holster and shoot
    It is interesting to note that that range has bullet holes in the floor and in the gate all the way to waist level from people practicing drawing and Shooting and pulling the trigger early
    Drawing from concealment and Shooting live fire is a skill that needs to be practiced

  12. This is a worthy skills test. Doing something like this is the reason I stopped carrying skinny 9’s in favor of compact 9’s. I wanted to be able to hit at all handgun ranges, not just bad breath range rapidly.

  13. avatar Brad Hayes says:

    Update on who gets the 200rds?:)

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