Hey OFWG’s! Remember this stuff. Those were the days, eh?

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33 Responses to From This to NERF at Christmas: Just Thought I’d Leave This Here

  1. When I was a little kid in the early 80’s we used to spend all day, sometimes several days in a row, having gun battles with all of the kids in the neighborhood. Some of the most fun I’ve ever had. Seems a shame that doesn’t happen anywhere near as often now.

    I recently searched for a cap gun as a present for my mom…the selection now seems almost nonexistent compared to back in the day.

  2. I was born in ’86, so I grew up very tail end of the ’80s n ’90s and was in highschool at the turn of the century. We had a few cowboy cap guns, some colored ‘tactical’ toy guns like MP5’s and 1/4-scale M-16s, but none of them were realistic like that. I knew I was jealous of my dad comin up in the ’60-’70s, but I didn’t know how jealous I should’ve been…

  3. Born in ’48, grew up in a fifties world of cowboys and Indians, cops-and-robbers and WW2 movies and TV shows. Our toy guns were as realistic as we wanted them to be.

    We would have been embarrassed to be shooting Nerf guns.

    • I was born more than a decade after you, and my mom’s idea of “baby sitting” was to haul me and my brother over to the range with our H&R .22 and a brick of ammo and turn us over to the old men, some of whom were WWII Marines, who hung out most every day at the range. She’d come back in the afternoon to pick us up.

      What she didn’t know was that after she’d been hauling us out there for a couple years in a row, the OFWG’s said “OK, enough with the .22 kids, it’s time you learned how to shoot a Garand, 1903, shotguns and, revolvers and a 1911…”

      If we dispensed with credentialled child care espoused by feminists and government knob-polishers, and instead turned young kids over to retired Marines for day care, I think we’d have a more productive and safer society.

      • DG wins the internet for best idea of 2016. Trump should implement all government funded day care to employ Marines.

        • Make marksmanship an elementary and high school requirement to pass on to the next grade or graduate.

      • This is a pretty late response but if I were on Facebook I would steal that and have it as the title or whatever of my page.

    • Born in 1950 and grew up in Chicago. My uncle gave me a highly detailed replica Thompson sub machine gun (with a stick magazine) for Christmas one year. Several years later My father found and presented to me a WW II surplus Springfield ’03 training rifle (a wooden dummy, no actual barrel) complete with a ceramic bayonet. I used to love putting firecrackers in the end of the barrel of that one and playing sniper.

      Nowadays if you showed yourself outside the house with either of those or any of the Johnny Eagles shown in the clip it would not be a case of “You’ll shoot your eye out, kid.” It would more likely be a case of “The cops will shoot your eye out, kid!”

  4. Greenie Stick’em Caps. Peel and stick piece of explosives. The cowboy six gun had plastic cartridge cases with a detachable bullet. You slapped a cap on the base of each round and when you dropped the single action hammer the bullet shot out of the barrel.

    Boys were in training to be men then. Not gender confused.

    • OMG! Those green sticky-backed cap charges were the bane if my childhood! My sadistic older brother used to leave them so they’d stick to the bottom of my shoes. Then when I’d walk on a hard surface… BANG! Ok, so it was more of a “pop” but at 6 or 7 years old it scared the crap out of me… probably literally.

    • Shootin’Shells, too! I had a Mattel Winchester lever action and a Colt Peacemaker that fired the shooting shells and Greenie Stickem caps. What fun!

  5. Replaced today with (dangerously? ) realistic airsoft guns.
    Boys will be boys.
    The conversation at the mom-in-laws lunch today was about the toys we wanted as kids: as adults, we can now get them- or better, the real thing!

  6. Don’t remember these. They look great. In the early 60’s me and my brother had the Mattel Tommy Gun and a great shiny 38. Part of a set(we were poor and I didn’t know it).Ozzie & Harriet days(only us old guy know what THAT means). I had a pretty good childhood…sigh.

  7. Wow, that brings back memories. I had the Magumba and Leutenant sets. The bullet/case was spring loaded. A plastic bullet would pop out when you pulled the trigger. Then you ejected the case. Had lots of fun with those guns around the neighborhood.

  8. multi pistol o9 shot short and long hard plastic projectiles. also there was a fake transistor radio that became a pistol and a fake shortwave that became a rifle.
    roll caps and revolvers that threaded them. the little pot metal bombs you could load with a sticky cap and toss.
    and wasp guns. holy dog balls were those things loud indoors. consumer reports warned against them, for the children.

  9. I had an imitation MP40 that shot plastic 9mm bullets out of 20 round magazine by very heavy spring about 20 to 25 feet in the late 1960’s. Great for using on younger brothers

    Plus some very realistic looking cap guns the same size and shape as Colt army. Made under license I think.

  10. Tsbhoa’s comment just reminded me we also had plastic darts about 3 inches long with metal top that you put a cap under the spring loaded pin and if you hit correctly it went off. Even better when you jammed 4 or 5 caps in

    • Used to take the whole roll of caps and smash it with a hammer. Sounded about like my 9mm without earplugs.

      Used Scotch tape to tape caps to the front of Hotwheels cars then staged head on collisions. The tape would catch fire. Awesomeness!

  11. Some of the greatest toys came out in the 60’s. Who remembers:

    – Johnny Seven OMA (One Man Army)
    – Johnny Reb Cannon
    – Mighty Mo Cannons
    – Sonic Blaster
    – Air Blaster Gun
    – Red Ryder BB Guns
    – Man From Uncle Guns

  12. Lets not forget the “carbide cannons” that you mail ordered from an ad in the back of a comic book. Great for waking the neighborhood up at about 6:00 am on July 4. I grew up in New Jersey and even in those days all of the cool stuff was illegal. My cannon was a straw purchase made by my cousin in Pennsylvania. 55 years later I think that the statute of limitations has run out and I can admit to some of this 😉 I remember visiting that cousin and walking into a hardware store with a fifty cent piece (who remembers those?) in my grubby 8 year old paws and walking out with a box of .22s. As long as you could see over the counter you were good to go. Lots of fun with single shot .22s and air rifles. One of my cousin’s friends – a “rich kid” – had a Remington Speedmaster semi auto. We were all jealous so we of course said that semi autos were inaccurate, wasteful of ammo, and jammed. No wonder we turned out the way we did.

    • I still have my carbide cannon but it hasn’t been fired in about 50 years. Incidentally, you can still buy the tubes of “Bangsite” (carbide granules) on ebay or Amazon.com. I’m putting in my order this afternoon…

      • The granular ‘carbide’ can still be bought, it’s the same stuff miners use in those old headlamps, slowly drip water on the carbide, and generates acetylene gas that you burn. A *very* smokey flame.

        Years back, I was given a giant can of the stuff by someone who was moving away. The can had started to rust, and with carbide, when exposed to air the humidity slowly liberates the acetylene gas So I transferred the contents into a one liter Nalgene lab bottle to seal it up. This was perfectly fine, it was airtight.

        Only one *little* problem cropped up a few years later.

        I had moved into a small apartment, and in the laundry room on the shelf above the washer and electric dryer I had some cardboard boxes with a bunch of stuff I called the ‘garage box’. Stuff like paint thinners, solvents and other things like that.

        Then my clothes dryer caught fire shortly after I left the apartment one day.

        The fire department showed up and put out the fire. They asked me what the hell I had stored in that laundry room for it to have burned as fiercely as it did.

        I told them about the box on the shelf above the dryer filled with flammables.

        It wasn’t until later I remembered the plastic bottle full of carbide that must have melted in the fire. When they nailed the laundry room with a blast of water from the fire hose, all that carbide must have started releasing all that acetylene gas.

        No wonder they asked me what the hell I was storing in there.

        Ooops.

        The one main take-away from that was I had a plastic dryer hose venting to the outside. Lint built up, and the electric heating element ignited it.

        If you have a plastic dryer vent hose, replace it with a metal one. The fire inspector informed me clothes dryers are a major source of house fires.

        Learn from my mistake. A number of months back, Jeremy S had a picture in an article of his that showed a big plastic container of shotgun powder sitting on the top of his gun safe. I advised him it might be a good idea to store flammables like that as low as practically possible.

        (Fortunately, thanks to the complex maintenance man seeing the smoke, he entered the apartment to see if I was in there. I wasn’t, but the cat was and she escaped through the open door. I named her ‘The Amazing Fire-Dancing Cat’ after that adventure.)

  13. Our toys were incredibly realistic. I had a starsky and hutch set of pistols that were full size 357 and 1911 guns without any red paint. Our cap guns had swing out cylinders and the sparks came out of the barrel.

    Queue up the safety Nannies to tell us how millions of kids were shot by cops accidentally.

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