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Made almost entirely of titanium, Liberty Suppressors’ new Goliath quiets down the mighty .458 SOCOM without adding as much weight as we’ve come to expect from big bore caliber cans. Shooting 450-grain subsonic ammo on a shorty 11″ barrel, Liberty’s stated volume measurements are as follows:goliath-db

Pretty dang impressive, especially considering the 163.1 dB unsuppressed level they measured. Heck, this is quieter than a lot of suppressed .45 ACP pistols are.

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Looks like it’s all titanium — Grade 5 for the end cap and core and Grade 9 for the tube — except for the swappable thread inserts, which are stainless steel. Here’s a little blurb straight from Liberty:

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Available today, The Goliath is the new all titanium 458 SOCOM silencer from Liberty Suppressors. At 10 inches in length and a 2 inch dameter, this beast tips the scales at only 20 oz. Taming this monster cartridge down to an average 132 dB (including First Round Pop), the Goliath is more than capable for this big bore caliber. When it comes to 458 SOCOM, it pays to have a giant on your side. Available today through Liberty Suppressors or your preferred Class 3 Liberty Suppressors Dealer.

MSRP for the Goliath is set at $999.

13 Responses to New From Liberty Suppressors: Goliath .458 SOCOM Suppressor

  1. I am missing “first round pop”. Is this a one-time occurrence, or first round from cold, every time? Then let’s talk about titanium. I am not an expert, but some characteristics I am familiar with, such as it changes color depending on what temperatures it has been exposed to. Judging from the SR-71 aircraft, I assume that black is the end result, but the bride has some earrings with multicolors, which we were told are applied with a torch, heating different portions to different temperatures. So, what I am asking, here, will an owner be able to watch this puppy go red, and yellow, blue, green and orange? That would be so cool!

    • Yeah, first round pop is mostly due to oxygen in a suppressor and cool air, so unburned powder burns in there and hot gasses can make sound hitting colder air. It wouldn’t happen if a suppressor were purged with CO2 or something ahead of time then sealed, for example. After the first shot in the vast majority of cases all that O2 is consumed and then you’re at a quieter, subsequent-shot level. It can also be alleviated with some water or other medium in there (such as wire pulling gel or ultrasound gel, etc) that burns up from the hot gases and cools them down much faster, making things quieter.

      …I think the suppressor is Cerakoted 😛

      • Do you know of any suppressor that mitigates FRP without the use of an ablative medium? I’m thinking of getting a suppressor and the only way I will buy one is if FRP is either significantly reduced or eliminated altogether.

        • It’s kind of a double-edged sword, as internal volume is one way in which a suppressor can be highly effective but more airspace typically leads to more 1st round pop. Some designs — like stacked K baffles — tend to have less FRP than a mono-core. But there are upsides and downsides to each. For the time being I’d say do a bit of google-fu. Maybe TTAG can post an article on this soon (if we haven’t already…I’m neck deep in Turkey Day prep and am fresh out of computer time now so can’t check at the moment haha).

        • @ropingdown Yes, it’s pending. I’ve had my Cosmic since June but didn’t want to write the review until I put some .458 S through it. Have shot 9mm, .40, 10mm, .45, and 5.56 through it so far. The CMMG Anvil (458 S AR) I’m supposed to be borrowing is delayed, and the Cosmic review has just stayed delayed with it haha

        • I believe OSS does not have much of a first round problem, but you would have to research that to confirm. They are not simply containing the gasses but channeling them through a long path before exiting so I think they would interact with the O2 differently.

      • My understanding has been that the SR is not painted, bare titanium is basic color. Cerakoting it seems silly, it does not corrode. Painting an aircraft which flies mach 3 seems like you’d have to do it every flight, it would peel off the paint every time.

  2. I’m curious as to a head to head with this vs the silencerco hybrid. For some reason I really want a can on my 45-70.

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