Riter & Stark SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle

Press release:

Feistritz, Austria (September 8, 2016) – Ritter & Stark, an Austrian-based firearms design and manufacturing company, will be exhibiting their initial product launch of the SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle (MTR) at the AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, held in Washington D.C., Oct. 3 – 5, 2016.

Ritter & Stark was formed in 2015 in an area of Austria well-known for introducing to the world some of the most innovative firearm systems ever produced. Bringing together highly skilled engineers, talented firearm designers, technologically advanced R&D and state-of-the-art manufacturing, Ritter & Stark developed a modular rifle platform designed to allow the user to customize it to be mission specific.
The SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle can be quickly and easily interchanged between a .308 Win., .300 Win Magnum and a .338 Lapua Magnum. The SX-1 allows operators to incorporate aftermarket magazines and drop-in upgrades with AR15/M16/M4 pistol grips and buttstocks that will fit the original Ritter & Stark folding buttstock mechanism.
Multiple features on the SX-1 MTR make this the ultimate precision rifle for serious shooters. The MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail is installed directly on the barrel, allowing barrel interchangeability with pre-set scopes for no shift of impact when changing calibers.
Easily and quickly done in the field, the patented caliber conversion system allows the barrel to be precisely positioned in the machined aluminum receiver with a greater area of contact allowing for more stability. The bolt is locked directly into the barrel breech giving the SX-1 unprecedented accuracy, shot after shot.
The SX-1 MTR barrel is processed in a unique CNC-controlled electrochemical machine. The process greatly limits any mechanical stress or the transmission of thermal effects on the barrel while ensuring a uniform match-grade barrel in either fluted or bull-barrel configuration.
Unlike other precision rifles, no matter the caliber, our barrels are guaranteed to at least 5,000 rounds for .308Win and .338LM, and 2,000 rounds for .300WM before noticing any degradation in accuracy.  For the shooter, this means that every rifle we manufacture can achieve 0.5 MOA 3-­-round groups or better with factory match grade ammunition.
Customization is key for military, law enforcement and precision long-range shooters as environments constantly change. The SX-1 MTR’s adaptability to fit the operator, as well as the scenario, is demonstrated in its adjustable cheekpiece, recoil pad, left/right folding capability of the buttstock and its acceptance of different aftermarket magazines, triggers and pistol grips.
The SX-1 MTR is also compatible with other manufacturers’ AR-10 magazines in the standard configuration.
The SX-1 MTR is the rifle of the future.  It combines the newest manufacturing processes with the most technologically advanced materials and is designed by some of the world’s most highly skilled firearms engineers. Every SX-1 MTR is put through the most rigorous testing available before it’s allowed out the door.
Visit Ritter & Stark at the AUSA show and see the future of rifle systems available now at booth #3315.
SX-1 MTR Specifications:
CALIBER
.308 Win (7.62X51 NATO)
.300 Win Magnum
.338 Lapua Magnum
Barrel Length
24.5″ / 623 mm
27.15″ / 690 mm
27.15″ / 690 mm
Overall Length
47.3″ / 1202 mm
50.8″ / 1291 mm
50.8″ / 1291 mm
Length Folded
37.5″ / 953 mm
41″ / 1041 mm
41″ / 1041 mm
Overall Width
3.2″ / 81 mm
3.2″ / 81 mm
3.2″ / 81 mm
Width Folded
4″ / 103 mm
4″ / 103 mm
4″ / 103 mm
Rifling Grooves
4
6
6
Rifling Twist
1:11” / 280 mm
1:10” / 254 mm
1:10” / 254 mm
TTL Weight (w/o mag)
12.8 lbs. / 5.9 kg
13.7 lbs. / 6.3 kg
13.7 lbs. / 6.3 kg
Ultralight Model Weight
11.25 lbs. / 5.2 kg
11.9 lbs. / 5.5 kg
11.9 lbs. / 5.45kg
Magazine Capacity
10 rounds*
5 / 10 rounds
5 / 10 rounds
Stock Length Adjustment
2.4″ / 60 mm
2.4″ / 60 mm
2.4″ / 60 mm
Optical Interface
MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail with 12, 20 or 40 MOA forward inclination.
Accessories Interface
Allows MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rails via M-LOK™ or M5 screws. Octagonal cross section enables handguard to accept accessories in 45° steps.
Folding Stock
MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail to attach a monopod.

Recommended For You

20 Responses to New from Ritter & Stark: SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle

  1. If the rail is mounted directly to the barrel, does this mean that it’s not free-floated?

    Would this affect the point of aim when it heats up?

    Anyway, looks expensive!

  2. Designed by the same engineers as the ORSIS T-5000 which you cannot get in the US due to Russian/US trade policy, unless of course you find one in Europe that’s legal to be moved here via a third party which will only add to the price.

    The T-5000 sells for €8000+ so I’m guessing they moved to Austria for legal import to the US market and the price will be similar. At the current exchange rate that would be a smidgen above $9000 and it doesn’t come with optics.

    • ORSIS T-5000 is a Rem-700 high quality clone…this rifle has nothing to do with T-5000, the core team used to work at ORSIS, but left, because the ideas this team had were unwanted…this is a new story, with a new gun.
      Regarding the key feature that everybody keep missing out behind the modularity, the main idea of this gun is to create a stable shooting platform, to give the barrel the role it deserves – the center part of the rifle. Bolt locked into the barrel breach, lugs machined directly in the barrel, scope mount is at the same time the stock lock around the barreled action. So we got 100mm length and almost 33mm diameter surface of contact area…
      Regarding the price, soon enough the first shipment will be sent to US, if all projected shipping costs adds up the price will be competitive to simmilar products.
      The SeX-1 is the first product, which will be followed by several products to embrace the SX-1 on top of the product family…thank you for your time and stay tuned)

      • All you have to do is e-mail them and ask:

        Dear Gerald,

        Thank you for your interest. The estimated MSRP in the US is $5.555,00 for the .308 Win version and $6.555,00 for the .300 WM and .338 Lapua Magnum. Barrel/caliber conversion kits will be available for aprox $2.000-$2.500.

        Our team is working on establishing our own import and distribution company in the US, meanwhile the first dealer in the US will most probably be Eurooptic.com we have a set delivery date on their shipment.

        Best Regards,

        Mit freundlichen Grüßen
        LL.B. Alexander Chikin
        Sales Director
        Ritter&Stark
        chikin@ritterstark.com
        Mobile +43 664 88 5456 41
        http://www.ritterstark.com

        HPP Precision Products GmbH,
        Bären Industriepark 12, 9181 Feistritz im Rosental, Austria
        FN: 443394a, UID: ATU70036846, FB Gericht: Klagenfurt

  3. Is anyone else getting sick of sooper-dooper tactic-ilicious rifles? They are all starting to look like metal insects to me. Wooden stock, please.

    • Very much so. They are starting to look like tactical cheese-graters.
      And a folding stock? Does it come with a 3-point sling too? I find it hard to imagine that someone willing & able to pay for this rifle would be doing anything but schlepping it to/from their Mercedes G-Class, Land Rover, or MRAP in a high-speed low-drag bag or hard case.

  4. Durn! ANOTHER cool gun I can’t afford. This is getting out of hand! Wonder if Bilzarrian (sp?) is interested in adopting a father figure?

  5. I don’t see much of a point to modular rifles. Once I build or buy a rifle in a particular caliber, it tends to stay that way. Looks cool to me, but I’d rather have a CZ HE II .338, Ruger Precision .308, and a decent .300 WM for the asking price.

    I like classic guns and modern guns.

  6. All of these super tactical rifles look great, but somehow without “life”.
    Tomorrow I’ll take my Persian Mauser out to the range and I’m already happy at the thought of touching such a great piece of wood and steel.
    Same feelings with all of my milsurps.
    Got just one modern rifle (AK) and sold it after shooting it twice.
    Got no emotional feedback from the thing.
    Still, when I get the chance to try and shoot some ultramodern rifles, I never say no.
    Just can’t get myself to bring another one home………….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *