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San Hosed: residents may soon be required to keep guns locked and inaccessible…even at home. San Jose City Council Is Sick Of You Defending Your Home With An Accessible Firearm – “Call it ‘keeping illegal guns off the street’ or call it what it really is, it makes no difference to San Jose politicians. San Jose City Council wants to enact a new measure that will further tie homeowners’ hands behind their proverbial backs. Under the ‘gun violence prevention ordinance’, practically hand-drafted by lobbyists for gun control movements in California, gun owners in San Jose will face new severe, strict ordinances that promise to make outlaws of law-abiding, armed citizens.”

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Naming and (allegedly) shaming: Activists attack BlackRock investments in gun company whose weapons were used in Aurora theater shooting – “Chanting ‘gun money’s blood money,’ a group of gun control advocates took to the streets Tuesday to rail against BlackRock, the investment management giant which, critics say, holds shares in at least two gun companies. The protesters began in Midtown at the Omni Berkshire Hotel, where Smith & Wesson’s top executive participated in a ‘2016 Best Ideas Conference’ hosted by another investment firm. From there, they headed to BlackRock headquarters one block away.”

How Can Parents, Pediatricians Discuss Guns In The House? – “Many children live in houses with guns, but pediatricians often don’t feel comfortable discussing gun safety with parents — even though most parents say they would welcome that conversation. That’s a key finding from a study published Wednesday in the Journal of Pediatrics.” Docs can always ask, just as parents can always choose to tell them to mind their own business.

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Every d-bag wants to be gangsta. Apparently. Alabama Man Apologizes After Facebook Photo Appears to Show Him Holding Gun to Puppy’s Head – “A Sheffield, Alabama, man publicly apologized Saturday amid public outrage over a Facebook photo that appeared to show him pointing a gun at a dog’s head. In pictures posted to social media, Zachary Wade Moore Jr. held what appeared to be a gun to a puppy’s head while holding the dog by the scruff of its neck.”

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Cancer Kills More People Than Guns – “About 30,000 of the 2.6 million American deaths each year are by firearms. It is heartbreaking to say, but of this 30,000, about 20,000 are suicides: two-thirds of the victims of gun violence die by their own hand. About 1.5 percent of deaths are by guns, and 0.34 percent are by gun homicides. How many of the more common causes of death get presidential press conferences? Why isn’t heart disease (about 611,000 deaths) a leading political issue instead of constitutionally protected guns? Why can’t we have more Rose Garden speeches on cancer (about 585,000 deaths)?” Do we really have to answer those questions?

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Ina’s not happy. Allowing guns on campus is too risky – “As for arming students in the name of safety, there’s this: In the Chronicle of Higher Education, Gary Olson, former provost of Idaho State University, says ‘there is no recorded incident in which a victim — or spectator — of a violent crime on a campus has prevented that crime by brandishing a weapon.’ Having guns in sock drawers, book bags, cars, locker rooms, faculty offices and study labs is asking — no, begging — for trouble.”

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They’re tooled up in North Carolina. Popular Carry-on Items at RDU Include Guns, Knives, Grenades – “In 2015, Transportation Security Administration officers at Raleigh-Durham International Airport stopped thirty travelers attempting to bring guns onto their flights. We’re a little over eight months into 2016, and already thirty-seven travelers have been discovered trying to fly with their guns. The majority of those guns were loaded, the TSA noted in a release yesterday.”

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FAIL: Democrats Try To Launch Gun Vote Campaign, Get Debunked By Gun Owners Instead – “Earlier this morning, Bearing Arms reported on a leaked memo from Democrat Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi that urged her constituents and colleagues to support a ‘gun violence prevention day of action.’ The campaign involved using social media starting at 12:30 PM EST with the hashtag #GunVote, in hopes that the trending topic would force a vote from Speaker Paul Ryan. Right on schedule, the tweets began to pour in from anti-gun officials – almost all of them containing factual inaccuracies.” Wait…factual inaccuracies in the service of civilian disarmament? Say it ain’t so!

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Any surprises here? The Dominant Forces In The U.S. Gun Market – “According to the Pew Research Center, there are an estimated 270 to 310 million guns in the United States, nearly one for every single person in the country. Given that massive number, it comes as little surprise that the civilian gun market is worth about $15 billion, a number that’s growing steadily.”

This lethal Japanese water gun is nothing like a Super Soaker – “The video is aptly titled ‘I made a super powerful water gun’ and shows the strength of the gun by shooting a bolt of water at a CD that instantly demolishes it. It’s all beautifully paired with some Japanese rock as background music and schematics of the gun’s inner workings that only make sense if you can read the language.”

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You are entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts. Gun Rights Group Files $12 Million Suit Against Katie Couric Over Deceptive Edit – “The Virginia gun rights group whose members were deceptively portrayed in Katie Couric’s documentary Under the Gun filed a $12 million defamation lawsuit against the Yahoo News anchor on Tuesday. The Virginia Citizens Defense League filed the suit in federal court against Couric, as well as the documentary’s director Stephanie Soechtig, Atlas Films, and the cable channel Epix.”

67 Responses to Springfield Armory Daily Digest: Hosed in San Jose, A Bad Day at Black Rock, and House Dems Grandstanding. Again. Still.

  1. “pediatricians often don’t feel comfortable discussing gun safety with parents”

    Why?

    I’m not uncomfortable when I tell pediatricians how to do pediatric brain surgery, and I have as much knowledge about pediatric brain surgery as the average pediatrician has about guns.

    And now, I think I’ll show Katie Couric how to fake a video.

    • I think it’s totally appropriate to discuss gun safety in the context of other household risks.

      “Child locks on the kitchen cabinets? Good. Now your child might some day come into contact with someone’s gun, particularly in the home of a friend or relative who doesn’t have kids. You should take care to safely store and handle all firearms, and as soon as your child is ready, teach them safe gun handling practices. The NRA has a good program for this- here’s a pamphlet on Eddie the Eagle. Now let’s talk about car seats and swimming pools, which are responsible for ONE BAZILLION TIMES AS MANY CHILD DEATHS AS GUNS.”

      • The problem with allowing this is (as I explain below) that there are real and persistent efforts (by several medical specialty groups wont to meddle in politics) to 1) systematically implement the gun question in a *routine* history and evaluation, and 2) insinuate their anti-gun agenda into the patient-doctor relationship by directing physicians to counsel their patients AGAINST keeping guns. In other words, it is an overtly stated agenda of these specialty organizations to urge Americans to give up their natural, fundamental and constitutionally protected human rights to keep and bear arms.

        Arthur Z Przebinda, MD
        Social Media Director, DRGO

        • But the answer is not to prohibit doctors from saying anything at all. Doctors may have any manner of political agenda, as is their right.

          Prohibiting all speech on a certain subject runs afoul of other constitutionally protected rights as well.

        • At issue is the fact that 1) there is a distinct power relationship between patient and doctor and the doctor has the upper hand. Coupled with an overt agenda to leverage that relationship to discourage gun ownership and reduce it nationally (a flagrant boundary violation, as DRGO has argued in the past) we have more than just the pitting of the doctor’s First Amendment rights vs the patient’s Second Amendment rights.
          But when the constitutional rights of one party come into friction with those of another – in an imbalanced power relationship – the Gentile balancing test must be applied. In this case, judging the constitutionality of professional speech regulation such as FOPA, Florida’s interest in enforcing FOPA decidedly outweighs any First Amendment right of physicians. This is a recognition that when a doctor is talking professionally to her patient, it’s not the same as a casual conversation or a public expression of opinion. It’s a special kind of speech whose purpose is only to help the patient. (from: drgo.us/?p=2876)

          Arthur Z Przebinda, MD
          Social Media Director, DRGO

        • Any prohibition should be on anti-gun advocacy, not on the mention of guns whatsoever. There is a big difference between asking if there are guns in the house, which is judgmental, and simply mentioning that gun safety is important, perhaps with reference to an Eddie the Eagle type program. The former is not helpful because it creates tension (which impairs the physician/patient relationship) and ignores the possibility of a friend or relative with unsecured guns. The latter is a legitimate anti-accident strategy, just like mentioning swimming pools or car seats.

          Can physicians be trusted to deliver health related messages in a non-judgmental manner without imposing upon them a categorical ban on certain kinds of speech? I hope so, because they do it all the time on countless other subjects.

        • An issue to consider: In a pure free market situation, this would not be as much of an issue. Your doc wants to pontificate about the evils of gun ownership? Fine, if you don’t like it get another doc. However, with HMOs it may not be trivial to find another physician, and you may have had to wait in line for some time to get where you are with your current system. Our brave new age of Obamacare has made this worse, and looks like it will get even worse before (if) it gets better. So, as with so many other things, non-issues become problematic with government interference.

        • Again, asking about guns is – by design, when part of a systemically designed and proscribed approach and position – opening the door to the anti-gun advocacy which we oppose.

          “Can physicians be trusted to deliver health related messages in a non-judgmental manner without imposing upon them a categorical ban on certain kinds of speech? ”

          The answer is: “NO”.

          None of the physicians in this country had a safe firearm handling class as part of their medical school curriculum. They are not just unqualified. They are being used to promulgate an institutional anti-gun bias (which DRGO has been both exposing and combating for over two decades).

          You keep using the term “nonjudgmental”. What we are fighting against is not personal preferences of the individual physician, but systematized anti-gun advocacy. There is a real, proactive effort to implement the virulently anti-gun animus of many in the academic medical establishment in the examining room.

          I urge everyone to read our 3-part series on the History of Public Health Gun Control:

          drgo.us/?p=1134

        • You keep saying “asking about guns,” and I keep saying “deliver a message about gun safety.” Can’t we both be right? Physicians shouldn’t “ask about guns” because if the patient says “no, I hate guns and don’t own them,” they may still need a talk about gun safety in other people’s homes. If you categorically prohibit ANY mention of guns, you’re missing an important safety topic. Pardon the metaphor, but I’m not quarreling with your diagnosis so much as the cure: Prohibiting any mention of guns by a pediatrician to his patient and family prevents discussion of an important topic and takes judgment and discretion away from a professional whose entire practice is based upon judgment and discretion. Like prohibiting a physician from discussion birth control or certain vaccines not based on medical factors, but political ones.

          You’re saying that the entire profession is so biased against guns that we should legislatively remove their right to talk about the subject at all. Is there any other topic that is absolutely off-limits for a doctor to discuss with his patient solely for political reasons? Like a religious practice with medical implications- first amendment issue?

        • Kevin, the answer *IS* to prohibit doctors from saying anything, given that they will be charging you over $250/hour to have them spew propaganda at you. About a subject they have zero training in, because they are required to by the government. And if you think there is a different agenda here, I’d like to hear it. They are not going to so much as remain in your presence without charging you for it.

        • This is not a matter of semantics or which of us is “right” in the use of a particular wording.
          This is a matter of preventing medical organizations from pressuring people to give up their guns. And yes, if you take the time to read our coverage of the history of anti-gun activism in academia and specialty organizations you will see that they are very much opposed to the RKBA.

          To the nuance of what you seem to be seeing as a difference of a choice of words: From one of the articles on our site (linked earlier): “Physicians can give patients advice or information regarding firearms they desire. In fact, physicians can treat and advise every patient *as if they were firearm owners, or potential firearm owners*. Further, if a physician in good faith believes that a patient’s firearm ownership is relevant, the physician may inquire about it. If a patient wants to talk about firearm ownership, the physician may freely engage in that discussion.”

          However, the problem is that one cannot suggest that a physician is in *any* way qualified to “deliver a message about gun safety” in a patient encounter purely on authority of being a physician. They are *not*. It is not part of medical training. (Just as they are not qualified to speak about theology or Orthodox Jewish doctrine or Catholic doctrine or LDS doctrine.)
          There is no medical credentialing process for providing unbiased gun safety information that is not hostile to the RKBA.

          DRGO has documented a concerted effort to insinuate a hostile, anti-RKBA message into the patient encounter:

          The American Academy of Family Physicians has an official policy stating, “The Academy opposes private ownership of weapons designed primarily to fire multiple (greater than 10) rounds quickly.” (www.aafp.org/about/policies/all/weapons-laws.html – bottom of page).

          You can also search our website for: “American Academy of Pediatrics” to see our documentation of their anti-gun advocacy.

          It is precisely because of this longstanding anti-gun track record that we draw a hard line on the issue. These organizations want to exploit the patient-doctor relationship to advance an anti-gun agenda, not general, innocuous safety recommendations.

          And opening the door to this is passive consent to the anti-gun advocacy we both oppose.

          Arthur Z Przebinda, MD
          Social Media Director
          DRGO

        • Kevin, you compare doctors discussing guns to them discussing birth control and vaccines. Those examples actually demonstrate exactly why doctors should not discuss guns. Doctors are uniquely qualified through their education and training to give me factual information about the benefits, risks, and safety precautions related to birth control and vaccines. As DRGO points out, doctors have no such unique expertise in gun safety. The only purpose in having doctors “discuss” guns with patients is to give an air of legitimate medical authority to gun control talking points.

        • If you all think that a pediatrician should be prohibited by law from simply referring patients and their families to an Eddie the Eagle program for gun safety, you have been smoking too much of the medicinal herb. Of all the things to put a doctor in jail for, this is not one of them.

        • Kevin, you misunderstand both Florida’s Firearm Owners’ Privacy Act (FOPA) and DRGO’s position. Neither prevents or opposes a doctor referring patients to NRA gun safety programs. In fact, DRGO encourages that practice.

          You may not have observed organized medicine’s two-decade concerted attempt to ban private gun ownership in America. I have not only observed it, I have lived it. People jumping into this debate without that perspective may not understand DRGO’s position that doctors shouldn’t ask about guns in the home. But the evidence is clear if you simply read our three-part historical series, as Dr. Przebinda suggested.

          To summarize: DRGO does not oppose doctors comparing hunting rifles or favorite handgun loads in a casual conversation with a patient. DRGO does oppose politically motivated questioning as described in the Kaiser Health News article, which is the reason we’re even discussing this issue. Such questioning is an abuse of the trust a patient necessarily places in a physician, and is called an ethical boundary violation. Doctors who engage in this practice should be disciplined.

        • Kevin. I really wish you would take a moment to look at the links I provide.
          You would find that DRGO is fine with doctors sending people to Eddie Eagle or similar.
          But we vehemently oppose doctors counseling patients to give up their guys – as is routinely suggested by these professional specialty organizations and the advocacy researchers who produce anti-gun propaganda under the guise of public health research.

          Arthur Z Przebinda, MD
          Social Media Director, DRGO

        • You good Doctors are not reading what I’ve written, but rather reflexively address statements that I have not made. Just so we’re clear: I agree that no doctor should “ask” about guns, or question ownership (for the reasons I stated), nor should they state a position on gun ownership or anything of the sort. I’ll reprint what I originally wrote about what I consider an acceptable and appropriate speech that would raise a safety issue without being judgey.

          “Child locks on the kitchen cabinets? Good. Now your child might some day come into contact with someone’s gun, particularly in the home of a friend or relative who doesn’t have kids. You should take care to safely store and handle all firearms, and as soon as your child is ready, teach them safe gun handling practices. The NRA has a good program for this- here’s a pamphlet on Eddie the Eagle. Now let’s talk about car seats and swimming pools, which are responsible for ONE BAZILLION TIMES AS MANY CHILD DEATHS AS GUNS.”

          Exactly how does this “counsel patients to give up guns” or anything else? Its a position-neutral statement about a risk that a child might face, and sensible advise that does not rely upon special training, knowledge of guns, or anything else you’re railing against. My God, you people are worse than lawyers (I should know).

      • The type of exchange you just describe is perfectly fine, probably even occurred a few times. The danger, as a few others have mentioned is when they want to start collecting data as to who is a gun owner/ has guns in the house hold and who isn’t, and making that part of your/your kids medical record. The former is a good bullet point in a list of things to be mindful of and requires no collection of data, the latter is dangerous.

      • You good Doctors are not reading what I’ve written, but rather reflexively address statements that I have not made. Just so we’re clear: I agree that no doctor should “ask” about guns, or question ownership (for the reasons I stated), nor should they state a position on gun ownership or anything of the sort. I’ll reprint what I originally wrote about what I consider an acceptable and appropriate speech that would raise a safety issue without being judgey.

        “Child locks on the kitchen cabinets? Good. Now your child might some day come into contact with someone’s gun, particularly in the home of a friend or relative who doesn’t have kids. You should take care to safely store and handle all firearms, and as soon as your child is ready, teach them safe gun handling practices. The NRA has a good program for this- here’s a pamphlet on Eddie the Eagle. Now let’s talk about car seats and swimming pools, which are responsible for ONE BAZILLION TIMES AS MANY CHILD DEATHS AS GUNS.”

        Exactly how does this “counsel patients to give up guns” or anything else? Its a position-neutral statement about a risk that a child might face, and sensible advise that does not rely upon special training, knowledge of guns, or anything else you’re railing against. My God, you people are worse than lawyers (I should know).

  2. Did they ask if any guns were used to prevent crime? Would you even accept it if they did?

    If the guns haven’t been used to cause harm, why so uptight about them? Why is having guns around magically dangerous despite evidence to the contrary? Why is self defense a myth despite its very real prevalence in other parts of America?

    How about NOT punishing people by stripping their rights just because they live in a very safe place.

  3. Pediatricians Discuss Guns In The House? Never trust a doc to talk to a kid without being around because many of them are absolutely clueless!

    In my case my seven year old daughter got a needle stuck in her foot rather badly and pulled it out herself and I took her to the doctor for a tetanus shot. When we were at the doctor they were horrified that there were needles around our house and it took me a minute to realize this nitwit thought we had hypodermic needles laying around on the floor of our living room and I had to explain it was a sewing needle. It took me what seemed like five minutes to make this idiot woman understand that we didn’t just throw something in the trash because a seam had ripped and that we actually repaired clothing that was otherwise usable.

  4. I always get a grin when I see a TSA photo of confiscated stuff and there’s a Swiss Army knife in the mix. Now there is a real terrorist’s terrorist weapon! “Hold still, infidel, while I poke your eyeball with my plastic toothpick, Allah willing!”

    • Or the false implication created by puthing an airsoft mp5 on the table. They talk about people trying to carry guns on the plane and then show plastic toys on the table. Just trying to shock the sheep.

    • Don’t forget the kitchen shears or the set of screwdriver bits. Can anyone make out what that stainless steel thing is sitting on top of the razor knife?

    • A few years back I was entering an immigration facility in California where they also housed illegals awaiting deportation or court hearings. I was stopped by the guard at the door and required to turn over the P-38 I had on my keychain! The P-38, for those without military background, is a military issued manual can opener for old style C-rations. It has a VERY small sharp point for the task. Hate to think what would happen if you tried to slip one of those past the TSA!

      • Ha! My dad brought a crap-ton of those home from Vietnam, and I used to carry one on my keychain. Still got a couple in a drawer somewhere. I was flirting with danger the whole time and never knew it.

    • I am usually upgraded to first class when I fly. With every meal I am given a serrated steel knife. But I can’t take my mini Swiss Army knife onboard.

  5. How dare they ask children questions about what is essentially their parent’s business and their rights? It isn’t any of their affair! This is what the Gestapo did to control the parent’s activities. Have the children turn in their parents!

    “Big Brother” is alive and well in the Doctor’s office!

  6. ‘Docs can always ask, just as parents can always choose to tell them to mind their own business.’

    I’m thinking I’d find a slightly less diplomatic way of saying it, though.

    • You might say I am even eager for one of my doctor’s to bring up the subject. I’m saving up for them. 😀

      Of course, if you’re in one of those states where random strangers can call in and have a ‘gun restraining order’ levied against you…probably not a good idea.

      But a doctor would never do that, right?…

  7. Taking a WAG, since industrial water-jet cutters can be 20,000 psi, that Do-dad appears to be a three-stage pump probably powered by a compressed air backpack…

      • “One industrial strength water gun.”
        “Its not mine, that’s not my bag, baby.”
        “One book, ‘Me and my Industrial Strength Water Gun: This is my Bag Baby.”
        “I have no idea what’s going on, love. Lets get out of here”
        *Frantically mimes put it in the bag.*

  8. I don’t know what’s worse — that someone thought that would pass or that the TSA confiscated a perfectly good MP-5

    • Airsoft, just like the goofy grenade. Honestly, if someone tried to board a plane with an MP5, let alone a grenade, it would make instant national news. That image is full of b.s.

      • The Austin TSA confiscated a grenade-shaped belt buckle at one point (spotted it in the state surplus store). Think about that for a second. A belt buckle. Maybe 1/4″ thick, at the most. There’s no way anyone would mistake it for the real thing. Which makes me wonder, what would they do if they saw a tattoo of a grenade? Cut it off?

    • Back in the 80s I worked airport security at John Wayne/Orange County airport. This was Wackenhut, before the TSA. We frequently came across obviously fake weapons from Disney’s Frontierland and to the disgust and dismay of the parents were required to confiscate them. Also many tears from the kids.

      Wasn’t a total waste of time, however, I did once find a carry-on bag with a stainless S&W .357 and $30,000 in cash.

  9. Do you know the way to San Jose-nope. Pretty healthy gun profits. Are those revenue figures accurate? Taurus claims double online…go get her guys! Make the failed Couric pay…

    • IANAL, but it looks to me like if they are actually suing Couric herself, if her employer steps in to pay the judgment or whatever, it is admitting complicity and responsibility and should be sued for 150 million more.

  10. ” but pediatricians often don’t feel comfortable discussing gun safety with parents”

    Do they talk about pools? Those kill more kids a year by far.
    How about medicine cabinets filled with lethal “candy”? That’s actually related to their profession.

    Also that’s Armored Core music in the water cannon video.

  11. How can a law requiring guns in the home to be locked up possibly stand in the face of Heller and McDonald, which rather unequivocally held that Americans have a right to armed self-defense in their homes?

    • Easy: it is based on the San Francisco ordinance upheld as constitutional by the Ninth Circuit. The ordinance avoids the heller decision by allowing guns to be loaded while in one’s possession. If you put it down you have to lock it up. This is called security theater. There is no way anyone will know unless it is stolen or a child obtains possession, the latter of which is already a crime.

      • Does the San Jose ordinance allow for unlocked firearms that are carried on the person like the San Francisco ordinance? If not, then San Jose’s ordinance is identical to the Washington D.C. ordinance that Heller struck down.

  12. Did anyone else actually read that nonsense article on TSA? They “bust” an armed traveler every 3 hours according to The Trace and that person gets up to an $11,000 fine even if they aren’t arrested.

    WTAF? Look, bringing a gun to the airport these days is kinda dumb but I’m sure it happens by accident. I know I was in a hurry at one point and had a pocket knife at the checkpoint. I just told them to keep it and rushed to my plane (fucking taxi driver but that’s another story). Using the term “busts” suggests that these folks have criminal intent, which if they did, they’d SHOOT UP THE SECURITY LINE because it’s a goddamn choke point!

    Jesus, I’m glad TSA’s employees took pity on my back in like 2005 when I had the bolt for an SKS in my carry on.

  13. When I was in Japan I saw some the most awesome “airsoft” guns. It seems they have a fascination with firearms, in part I imagine because I don’t think they are allowed to have any.

    • Yeah, I was 14 in 1960, living on the beach in Japan with a .22 semiauto with a scope. Japanese, especially the kids, were all over me every time I took it out. Doesn’t sound like that attitude has abated at all.

  14. Re: “How Can Parents, Pediatricians Discuss Guns In The House?”

    This article is meant to gin up support in the yet-unresolved Wollschlaeger case (in the litigation of which DRGO has been a party on numerous occasions).

    The libertarian viewpoint may be that “Docs can always ask, just as parents can always choose to tell them to mind their own business.”

    In that case, I would appeal to your libertarian ideals by pointing out that there are real and persistent efforts (by several medical specialty groups wont to meddle in politics) to 1) systematically implement the gun question in a *routine* history and evaluation, and 2) insinuate their anti-gun agenda into the patient-doctor relationship by directing physicians to counsel their patients AGAINST keeping guns. In other words, it is an overtly stated agenda of these specialty organizations to urge Americans to give up their natural, fundamental and constitutionally protected human rights to keep and bear arms.

    Arthur Z Przebinda, MD
    Social Media Director, DRGO

  15. When I got frozen shoulder, I asked my ortho doc if shooting would be an issue. He said it would actually help loosen it and called in the physical therapist, who I also discussed the issue with. Don’t know if he was an anti or just unfamiliar with guns, but the therapist said to the doc “Do you know what this guy does for a living (gun instructor)?” Doc says “Yes, isn’t it cool?”

  16. Hmm. Isn’t defacing or destroying US Currency outside of lawfully authorized banks illegal? Maybe someone should go after the guy there who’s ruined money with (probably) fake blood…

    Also, editors, where’s my EDC that I submitted? 😛 People asked to see more women’s kits. Or is it too manly so it doesn’t count? ;3

  17. If my kids’ pediatrician wants to talk to me (not them) about gun safety, I’m game. If she can recite the 4 basic rules of gun safety, and then explain to me how to properly unload and clear an AR-15, a SAW and a 1911A1, then I will happily listen to what she has to say on the subject. Fair, no?

    • The M249 might be a bit much for your average pediatrician.

      I’d replace that with something like care and handling of another gun. The others are fair questions though.

  18. I would note I was happy to discuss shooting with my ophthalmologist – he was able to order me some shooting glasses with poly-carbonate safety lenses, great anti-glare coating and a mild prescription to combat my problem with red dot sights “flaring” due to astigmatism.

    • I mentioned prescription shooting glasses to my wife last time I was getting new glasses, and the Dr. overheard — he beelined over to me and enthusiastically told me all about them. It was a pleasant surprise. Unpleasant, but not a surprise: the fact that I can’t afford them.

  19. Wow, the BlackRock protester had, what, 4 people? Five? I’m impressed and cowed.

    Re ‘there is no recorded incident in which a victim — or spectator — of a violent crime on a campus has prevented that crime by brandishing a weapon.’ Well, of course not. If there were, and a student reported it, the student would most likely have been expelled. A student thoughtful enough to carry would hopefully be able to figure out the consequences if things stopped at “OMG my victim has a gun!” and reported it.

    • Google is your friend… Keltec is listed as 10-20 million annual revenue.Not bad but dwarfed by the others on this list. They are a private company with no wish to go into debt. Which is fine except a whole helluva’ lot of people want to buy their stuff…like a PMR/CMR.

  20. I forget exactly which is which in San Hosed but the Mayor and the Chief of Police are involved with BLM and La Raza. They don’t want their constituents hurt by some mean home owner defending their home.

    StopNewsom.com

  21. If forced to comply just keep a pair of tin snips next to your “locked” gun. Cable locks are anything but secure. Clipping them is like pruning flowers. I’ve personally popped three of them with nothing but my bare hands and my hulk strength.

  22. “pediatricians often don’t feel comfortable discussing gun safety with parents — even though most parents say they would welcome that conversation”

    Have to raise the bullshit flag. I’d like to see documentation for the claim that “most parents” want to discuss firearms “safety” with a freaking pediatrician. Following that, I’d like to see the syllabus for becoming a pediatrician, particularly the units of study which cover “gun safety”. Finally, I would like to see the amount billed to your unsuspecting insurance carrier (or to *YOU*!) for the time your extremely gun-savvy pediatrician spends with you “discussing gun safety”. If you wish to discuss gun safety, you’ll be better off going to Cabella’s, where they actually know something about the subject, and will not charge you $250/hour for the discussion. Or any one of dozens of equivalent sources, none of which is likely to be your pediatrician. If such had ever been suggested to me, I’d hope I would have thought to say “sure, let’s meet up at the range and discuss it over a contest of skill, run what you brung.”, just to watch him squirm.

  23. ‘there is no recorded incident in which a victim — or spectator — of a violent crime on a campus has prevented that crime by brandishing a weapon.’

    Just plain wrong on the facts. Incidents at Appalachian State U. and University of Texas come to mind, just off the top of my head. I’m sure there are more.

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