TTAG Daily Digest 4.13.16

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Maybe you caught our quote of the day yesterday. It featured New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton reacting to one of his players being shot to death after a New Orleans traffic mishap. The coach displayed some, shall we say, incomplete knowledge of firearms and the laws that regulate them in this country. In response, bizpacreview.com details that he got more than a little pushback in Social media schools NFL coach for lashing out against guns rightsIn other news of the uninformed and just plain false . . .

Hillary Clinton’s offensively false claim about Bernie Sanders and gun-industry ‘immunity’ – Hillary will never be the politician her husband is. But if she’s learned anything from him, it’s how to shamelessly lie and rely on (most of) the media to look the other way in support of their chosen candidate.

California school district votes to allow teachers to carry guns in the classroom – You read that right…California. As you might expect, Salon is aghast. So good news all the way around.

Five Tips That Might Save Your Life In a Knife Attack – Tip number 6: carry a gun and be familiar with the Tueller drill.

Officials Arrest Man Suspected of Supplying Guns to Paris Supermarket Shooter – Clearly what France needs is tough, common sense gun control laws to keep these weapons of war out of civilian hands. Oh. Wait.

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New Mil-Spect Pistol Case Hits the Goldilocks Zone – Just right?

Taxing $1,000 per Gun Became a Reality in One U.S. Territory — and Some Worry It Could Spread – Coming soon to California? Maryland? Connecticut?

Families sue Wal-Mart, others for selling guns used in Jewish facility murders – Good luck with that. No, not really.

comments

  1. avatar peirsonb says:

    First, you can’t have two top priorities. Law enforcement or the community. Pick one.

    Second, poll tax, plain and simple.

    1. avatar VaqueroJustice says:

      Yea, they can try to tax guns out of existence, as the nfa tried to do,
      but think about this: To enforce this tax, the government would have to
      have some mechanism to know what guns were owned by whom.
      Default registration of firearms by the IRS, in whos system you are considered
      guilty until proven innocent.
      Of course, this power would never be directed toward political ends. No administration
      has ever used the IRS to attack their political enemies, so we can all relax.

      1. >_> I see the sarcasm… but I still don’t like it… because it’s what will happen if left unchecked…

    2. avatar Rusty Chains says:

      I do seem to recall some stamp act tax collectors around the time of the American Revolution. They had some sort of trouble collecting stamps, or was it a tax collection issue? I seem to have forgotten, could someone remind me what that was?

      1. avatar Brentonadams says:

        I think the Indians threw all their stamps into Boston harbor. Something like that

    3. avatar Felix says:

      More to the legal point, the Supreme Court has already ruled you can’t single out a fundamental right for taxation. You can collect sales tax on newspapers, but only the same tax as applies generally. This is another slam-dunk loss.

    4. avatar Bmworld says:

      Poll tax. That’s the first thing that popped into my mind as well

  2. avatar Geoff PR says:

    “New Mil-Spect Pistol Case Hits the Goldilocks Zone – Just right?”

    Meh.

    It’s about the same price as a Pelican, and Pelicans are a ‘known-good’ gun case…

  3. avatar scooter says:

    To be fair on the knife attack article, it said ATTACK, so #6 should be SHOOT THEM.

  4. avatar Dean Carpenter says:

    About those knife fight pointers. Somewhere past my 64th year the first 5 no longer were viable options. I am now carrying a 44 magnum and am trying to memorize those lines from “Dirty Harry”. I am also working on an assault walker with a few surprises in case Hillery gets her way.

    1. avatar Mudshark says:

      Assault walker, thats funny. Carpenters Assault Walker. Patent pending

  5. avatar 16V says:

    Ugh. The NFL player “victim” of the shooting had committed a hit and run on his “aggressor” a few blocks earlier. The guy in the Hummer was actually on the phone with 911 shortly thereafter, trying to get a plate to report the actual offender. You know, the football ‘hero’.

    Oh yeah, witnesses claim to have seen a gun produced by the “victim”, which was actually found and acknowledged by NOPD. The use thereof still remains to be proven.

    An NFL player committing a crime? It’s a rare month where one doesn’t commit a violent felony, and there’s less than 1700 of them.

    http://sports.cbslocal.com/2015/10/01/nfl-month-without-arrest-first-since-2009/

    1. avatar the ruester says:

      Looking more and more like that first hit was retaliation for some earlier incident, also. It’s funny, with Zimmerman we were told he pursued, started the fight, and murdered Martin because he “started to lose.” Seems like in this case that might be exactly what happened, with witnesses, except this time the “loser” got shot before he could grab his own gun. So, will that same machismo street thug nonsense be used to vindicate Hayes? Or will BLM simply blame white people for guns even existing in the first place? Isn’t naked, seething racism fun?

      1. avatar 16V says:

        BLM will cast this anyway they can, for whatever insanity they’re selling this week.

        Pretty standard behavior for those with few brains, lots of money, and having gotten away with everything their entire lives. Cultural glorification of thug behavior is merely icing on the cake. There’s less than 1700 NFL players and IIRC there was a 6 year run where at least one was arrested per month and they do like hit and runs. A lot.

        Not sure where you’re going with the Zimmerman thing. Yes, he probably should have stayed in his car, yes the kid was a saint. You know, like Michael Brown.

  6. avatar wrightl3 says:

    OMG! COMMON SENSE IN CALIFORNIA! OMG!

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      It’s actually not the first to do so. Just after the bill (which bans CCWs on school campuses without administration permission) became law, the Anderson Union School District in Northern California (about 2 .5 hours north of Sacramento) granted blanket permission to all CCW holders to carry on their campuses. Sadly, the rest of the school districts in and around that area did not follow suit.

    2. avatar Katy says:

      The salon article, unsurprisingly, is disappointing. It links to the Sacramento Bee (which reprinted the original Fresno Bee) article, where not only does he say he’s all for staff carrying if they are willing to confront a threat, but he points out they are doing all they can to protect their students – that latter is key in establishing that the carry is not from a sense of heroism, but a desire to do all that is possible to protect the most vulnerable. Unsurprisingly, that didn’t make the salon cut.

  7. avatar MSgtB says:

    If the shooter, as the article about the Jewish facility says, did start the purchase then claimed no ID the sale should have ended there.
    Article states that the shooter offered the associate his friend to complete the sale, which he did. The associate would have violated Walmart policy as well as the law. Sue the associate. The company is unfairly included for deep pockets.

    1. avatar Katy says:

      Depends on the training and what his manager might have said.

      1) if he was trained to allow the sale to proceed, or this was common and known behavior in the department, WM is a valid target;

      2) if the manager, in his position as authority in WM, directed the sale to proceed over objection from the associate, WM is a valid target

      3) if the associate really went off on his own, violating not just policy, but an enforced policy, and WM had no indication that he would do so and took immediate steps to correct the wrong, WM might not be a valid target.

      This is all a matter of fact, though, and thus is up to a jury to decide. I’d say that their inclusion in the suit is appropriate.

  8. avatar Jim Bullock says:

    “California school district votes to allow teachers to carry guns in the classroom – You read that right…California. As you might expect, Salon is aghast. So good news all the way around.”

    So…

    The people directly impacted want one thing, while the people not impacted want to impose another, on people not them. Really, I have yet to see a civilian firearm that’ll reach from some outland school district to Sacramento, or DC. So, really who’s business is it?

    There’s an analogy that applies to presumptive nominee Clinton’s recent gun-related swipe at insurgent of convenience Sanders. (The D one. Not the one insurgenting the R party.) Granting for the sake of argument, her assertion that guns getting to NYC come from Vermont, because of Vermont’s “lax” gun regulation, who is impacted more? For every gun not permitted in Vermont for the sake of NYC, one person can’t do what they want, at all, while another person gets a little slice of what they prefer, kinda.

    Really, this comes down to “We’re more important than you.” Of course some Vermont bitter clingers can be imposed on at the whim of NYC overlords, because who matters here?

  9. avatar Tal says:

    I’m assuming the families suing the Walmart are Jewish.

    As a Jew I can’t and I mean CAN’T understand why the majority of American Jews are liberal anti-gunners. It’s honestly dumbfounding.

    When “Never Again” slowly turns into “Until Next Time” I guess.

    1. avatar SteveInCO says:

      As someone who is NOT Jewish, I share your dumbfounded frustration…and I do contribute to Zelman Partisans (the true successor to JPFO).

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