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The NRA writes [via Ammoland.com]

Firearms, like any mechanical tool, are capable of malfunctioning. Whether it’s the result of user error or an unavoidable part failure, jams happen and while being a mere annoyance for plinker, they can have dire consequences for someone who owns a pistol for protection. Below we address the most common stoppages you can encounter when shooting a semi-automatic firearm and how to recognize and resolve them . . .

Keep in mind that if you notice a problem with your firearm, do not attempt to shoot it until you have assessed the issue and always follow the NRA’s fundamental rules for safe gun handling:

1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.
3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.

If you are not comfortable handling the situation on your own, there’s no shame in getting the attention of your instructor or a range officer and asking them to assist you.

Without further ado, here are the three most common types of semi-auto stoppages:

Firearm Stoppages : Failure to Feed

What happens: You pull the trigger and the gun goes click instead of boom. While it’s often a dud cartridge that just won’t fire, it could also mean the magazine failed to load a new cartridge into the chamber.

What to do: Tap the bottom of the magazine with the palm of your support hand to ensure it’s fully seated. Invert the gun and rack the slide to clear any stoppage and load a fresh round into the chamber. Finally, re-assume the shooting position and assess the target area. This is known as the Tap, Rack and Assess drill.

Firearm Stoppages : Failure to Eject

Firearm Stoppage Stovepipe : Image credit: Wikipedia.org

What happens: Also known as a stovepipe, this stoppage occurs when you pull the trigger and nothing happens, similar to a Failure to Feed. But with this stoppage you’ll notice the cartridge from your previously fired round is now stuck in the ejection port, resembling… a stovepipe. This jam will also cause your slide to not sit completely forward.

What to do: Like with a Failure to Feed, the Tap, Rack and Assess will suit you here. Tap the bottom of your magazine to make sure it’s seated, rack the slide to feed a new round into the chamber and force the jammed cartridge out, and assess downrange.

Firearm Stoppages : Failure to Go into Battery

Firearm Stoppage Double Feed : Image credit: RobarGuns.com

Firearm Stoppage Double Feed : Image credit: RobarGuns.com

What happens: A Failure to Go into Battery occurs when the cartridge is not fully seated in the chamber, forcing the slide to not fully sit forward. A variation of this stoppage, known as a Double Feed, happens when the slide picks up a fresh round before the previous cartridge can be ejected and attempts to seat them simultaneously.

What to do: A Tap, Rack and Assess should work, although you may have to rack the slide a little more vigorously than with the other two types of stoppages. Occasionally you may have difficulty clearing the chamber due to pressure applied by the magazine’s spring. In this case you should remove the magazine, which may take a little force, and rack the slide several times until the chamber has been cleared. Then reload your magazine, give it a good tap on the bottom, rack the slide to load a new cartridge, and assess the target area.

Remember that these are just the three most common types of firearm malfunctions. The basic principle behind the Tap, Rack, and Assess drill is to resolve the stoppage by unloading and reloading the gun, but firearms and bullets can fail in other ways.

If your gun ever performs in a way that seems off, do not try to fire another round until you have determined it is safe to do so.

Stoppages happen from time to time, but the risk can be mitigated through proper stance, using reliable ammunition, and regular maintenance of not just your firearm, but your magazine and any accessories you use. Get in the habit of cleaning your tools after you use them and your guns should enjoy improved reliability and a longer life.

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68 Responses to Three Most Common Firearms Stoppages And What To Do About Them: Guns for Beginners

  1. I’ve cleared stovepipes just by running the edge of my hand over the ejection port to “scrape” the spent casing out. It’s a lot faster than tap, rack. Do you guys see any problem with doing it that way?

      • Excellent video; thank you for sharing. The key point he is making about having one consistent method of clearing a malfunction (tap, rack, bang), with backup (removal of the magazine, multiple racks, tap, rack and bang) is great advice. No assessment of the malfunction is necessary.

        At the range, I would take the time to assess the malfunction, but the clearing process would be the same. In a fire fight, just go for it. BTW, I call this technique the “whack it and rack it,” which I think is a catchy phrase and emphasizes that some force needs to be applied to the bottom of the mag to be sure it is seated.

        • True, except for for cases like in ARs where the “one failure drill to rule them all” could actually make the problem worse or completely take the weapon out of the fight. Like doing a tap rack on a failure to eject that causes a double feed, or smacking the forward assist on a failure to go into battery on a cartridge that is slightly out of spec and completely locking the gun up. Otherwise yes, streamlining your processing of failures is a good thing.

        • I agree that clearing jams on an AR is a different problem from a semi auto pistol. My comment was directed toward pistols only.

      • Excellent video!!! He did that well and you could see his hands were freezing.
        I have had a couple of fail to feeds and ejects in something over 1000 rounds in my C9. This video made it simple.
        I appreciate that no one one here has made any snarky remarks about the Hi Point and it was good to see others might experience a problem once in a while with a more expensive firearm.
        A credit to this site and the folks on here.

    • I think of malfunctions differently:

      Failure to fire (round does not ignite)

      Failure to feed (round fails to enter chamber)

      Failure to eject (case fails to be removed from ejection port)

      But that’s just my take.

    • No, your way is the correct way.

      If the stovepipe is removable by the hand, by all means remove it. But be careful there may or may not be a round fed. And in the case of an AR, or guns with similar extractor/ejector setup, the extractor may or may not be over the rim if there IS a round picked up before the bolt closes on the stovepipe.

      Best way: click – see stovepipe – remove it – tap forward assist or back of the slide – rack. This way it will get rid of the stovepipe, get rid of the round in the chamber that is not under the extractor, and get a new round in correctly.

  2. Get an AK and a CZ pistol and you don’t have to worry so much about these type of failures. Glocks and AR’s are prone to do this.

      • To be fair, that is largely because the shooter did not intend to fire, so the slide was obstructed by his pocket or something, but these are not too important since he just shot himself, so doesn’t really want to fire again. Zing!

        All in fun, but we should recall that some people may come here for the truth about guns, and this ain’t it.

        These methods seem to assume a tactical response, which I have honestly not attempted to train myself in. With any such malfunction, my first response is normally to lock the slide back and drop the mag, in order to assess the status of the gun and the ammo.

        • I practice tap and rack drills at home with snap caps. At the range, I do as you do. If I had the line to myself I’d tap-rack-bang, but as I’m responsible for other lives, I take the extra time to assess, in case of a 1 in a million hang fire.

    • As much as I like CZs my dad had an SP 01 Phantom that jammed a lot. We were pretty sure it was one of the mags but he ended up selling it for an XDm.

        • Because we weren’t 100% sure, mags are not terribly easy to get for an uncommon gun like that, and if we were wrong we would have a lemon gun we had just put another $50 bucks into. So he sold it for more than he bought it for and I traded him my XDm compact.

      • Did you try searching for mec gar SP 01 mags? I find many stores selling them for under $30 dollars. They are the OEM manufacturers also for CZ mags.

        • That’s what I was thinking, Mec Gars for $25 all day long, online. I love my 15 round mec gars for my hi-power clone, so much so that I bought 3 for my cz clone I will be shooting for the first time tomorrow.

    • I guess it’s time to sell my Glock and AR. They haven’t failed me once in thousands of rounds but now that I know this I can never trust them again. Thanks for the heads up Charlie!

    • I’m an AK and CZ guy and while I obviously made the perfect choices, those other choices are good, just not perfect.

      What’s the line? AKs are far more accurate than you’d think and ARs are far more reliable than you’d think.

      While a Glock is obviously uglier, generally more expensive, has poorer fit and finish than a CZ or anything Fischer Price is knocking out. I don’t doubt they are very reliable.

      To be fair the Fischer Price toys probably contain more lead than either the Glock or CZ fully loaded so a tie for deadliness there.

    • Getting a CZ and an AK is a weird choice.
      In terms of pairings, I’d say the modern 1911 pairs better with the AR: beautiful, technologically sophisticated (perhaps too much?), precise, requires very regular maintenance to be reliable.
      And the AK pairs better with the Glock: butt-ugly, terrible ergonomics, no precision, but can use mud as a cleaning agent and still work.
      The CZ pairs best with its fellow Czech weapon: the vz. 58 (from CSA, not the VZ-2000): beautiful, breakthrough design, excellent ergonomics, great precision, very reliable.

  3. This is where revolvers have a big advantage over gas operated pistols. If a round fails to fire just pull the trigger and go on to the next. However, your capacity is already limited so a dud round means you already lost anywhere from 1/5 to 1/8 of your ammo.

    • What happens to that revolver if the malfunction was a hangfire? I would imagine a round going off in the cylinder could be a very bad thing.

      • Good point. I guess you hope that you are able to get-off enough shots from the remaining cylinders before the hang-fire disables your revolver.

      • With modern primers and powders is a hang fire still a thing? What would realistic odds of a hang fire be?

        • The modern incidence of hang-fire is low – very low.

          In my bullseye shooting this winter, I’ve been burning through the last bricks of a couple of cases of Remington .22LR target ammo I bought years and years ago. About every 75 rounds, one fails to ignite. In thousands of rounds, the duds pile up.

          Not one of them has been a hangfire. Not one of them would ignite with a fresh strike on the rim in a different position. They’ve all be dead-as-a-wedge duds.

        • Yep. Sept 2014. Friend had one in my PF9 with WWB. She started to move pistol to see what went wrong. Two of us start yelling to keep it downrange. Went off what felt like about four seconds after trigger pulled (she looked, brought pistol in, we yelled and hangfire while we were yelling). She limpwristed it. FTF next round, she put it on thr ground and said “F**k that POS” despite it being ammo’s fault.

          PF9 is still a POS, IMO.

      • At the range you have the luxury of taking a minute before clearing the round. In a self defense situation you’ll have more pressiy issues to worry about. Besides, having your fingers an inch away from the ejection port when the round goes off out of battery won’t be much fun either.

    • Exactly so. For beginners and people with little time to invest in training & drills, double action revolvers cure most of these issues – along with the issues of limp-wristing a recoil semi-auto, unintentionally dropping the magazine when unfamiliar with the controls, and forgetting to take off the safety.

      • “For beginners and people with little time to invest in training & drills, double action revolvers cure most of these issues – along with the issues of limp-wristing a recoil semi-auto, unintentionally dropping the magazine when unfamiliar with the controls, and forgetting to take off the safety.”

        And replace those issues with a whole new different set of potential problems, such as: failing to even BEGIN to master the long/heavy DA trigger stroke (meaning they will completely miss the target at all but the very closest of distances), having accidental discharges when trying to cock and fire a revolver rapidly in SA mode while under time/stress pressures (because it’s easier to hit the target SA, and that makes them want to shoot it that way all the time), experiencing painful recoil when firing even marginally powerful/effective ammunition from lightweight/concealable revolvers (which reduces the amount of practice they desperately need to be effective), and the reduced capacity of most defensive revolvers, which means they have very few rounds to stop the attack/attacker(s) before the revolver’s problematic reloading becomes a serious issue.

        For beginners and less-trained folks, these are all serious issues. If they are willing to take the time to get good training to overcome these issues, then the same amount effort/training could be used to overcome the autoloader issues listed above, leaving the shooter better trained and better armed with a more effective fighting tool.

        • ‘And replace those issues with a whole new different set of potential problems, such as: failing to even BEGIN to master the long/heavy DA trigger stroke (meaning they will completely miss the target at all but the very closest of distances),’

          – DA trigger pulls are not an issue inside of 7 yards. Even for beginners. If you intend to shoot at longer ranges you’re going to need to practice whether you’re shooting a revolver or a pistol.

          ‘…having accidental discharges when trying to cock and fire a revolver rapidly in SA mode while under time/stress pressures (because it’s easier to hit the target SA, and that makes them want to shoot it that way all the time),’

          – Huh? How are you going to have an ‘accidental’ discharge when you’re intentionally pointing the firearm at either a target at the range or at a bad guy in a defensive gun use while trying to shoot as fast as possible?

          ‘…experiencing painful recoil when firing even marginally powerful/effective ammunition from lightweight/concealable revolvers (which reduces the amount of practice they desperately need to be effective),’

          – .38 special is ‘painful’? Besides, I thought we were talking about people who wouldn’t practice much anyway.

          ‘..and the reduced capacity of most defensive revolvers, which means they have very few rounds to stop the attack/attacker(s) before the revolver’s problematic reloading becomes a serious issue.’

          – Ever heard of .357 magnum? Even if you miss completely the bad guy’s going to know better than to wait around for you to shoot 5 more times.

          ‘For beginners and less-trained folks, these are all serious issues. If they are willing to take the time to get good training to overcome these issues, then the same amount effort/training could be used to overcome the autoloader issues listed above, leaving the shooter better trained and better armed with a more effective fighting tool.’

          You can’t develop skills without practice regardless of what type of weapon you’re choosing. That’s like saying a banjo is better than a guitar because you can’t get good at playing the guitar without practicing.

        • “DA trigger pulls are not an issue inside of 7 yards. Even for beginners.”

          My experience training over 1000 “beginner” revolver shooters for the USAF in the 80s, and several hundred more civilians in the 90s-20teens differs from yours — significantly. Can they hit a full-size B-27 silhouette? Yes. Somewhere. Can they hit it in a vital zone, regularly? No, they cannot, until they get some decent training and quality practice.

          “Huh? How are you going to have an ‘accidental’ discharge when you’re intentionally pointing the firearm at either a target at the range or at a bad guy in a defensive gun use while trying to shoot as fast as possible?”

          What I’ve seen repeatedly, is the shooter attempting to thumb-cock the revolver at high speed, while failing to remove their finger from the trigger/triggerguard area. As soon as the hammer is cocked, the trigger finger “touches” the trigger, firing the weapon before it is anywhere near the target (often, into the ground/range-floor in front of them, as it is angled downward during cocking).

          “.38 special is ‘painful’? Besides, I thought we were talking about people who wouldn’t practice much anyway.”

          To use your caliber example, in (as I said) lightweight/concealable revolvers? Yes, .38 Special +P defensive loads are painful in something like a S&W alloy-frame-J-frame, or at least not very pleasant to shoot, especially for new shooters. If you doubt this, you simply haven’t spent very much (or any?) time training new shooters with defensive revolvers. And while most new shooters know enough to at least shoot a cylinder or two of loads through their new revolver (to make sure it works), if this test-fire is painful/not-pleasant, they often won’t ever do it again, by choice. I’ve bought many lightly-used J-frame snubbies with a partial box of the only ammo the previous owner ever purchased, and it was bought on the same day as the gun, decades earlier.

          “Ever heard of .357 magnum? Even if you miss completely the bad guy’s going to know better than to wait around for you to shoot 5 more times.”

          Once again, you are clearly demonstrating that you have never trained a new shooter with a light, short-barreled revolver, let alone a light, short-barreled MAGNUM revolver. Until you hear the words “I didn’t shoot at the person who was threatening my life, because I was afraid the gun might hurt me…” come out of the mouth of a new gun owner, you can’t understand the type of fear that some new/untrained people are dealing with when they first buy a defensive handgun.

          Take your bravado and stick it. People like you have probably done more to turn non-gun-owning people away from guns and gun ownership than anti-gun activists.

        • Guess I missed that. USAF issuing revolvers.

          So how is a J frame any different than Ruger LCP? Your argument is that semi-autos are better than revolvers because the smallest lightest revolvers are challenging to shoot. But the smallest lightest pistols are just as hard to shoot. So what’s your point? You like autos and hate revolvers. Got it.

        • I don’t hate revolvers; I’m a former PPC shooter and current (albeit only occasional) IDPA SSR shooter. I have a S&W model 617 .22 that I’m really trying to wear-out, and a Ruger Redhawk that I fear I’ll never be able to wear out (owned it for 30 years, shoot it DA 99% of the time).

          Revolvers have a place in this current world ruled by autoloaders, but that place isn’t in the hands of untrained beginners, just because the initial loading and manual of arms is simple (Fill the chambers and close it, and you’re ready to go! Just pull the trigger if you need it!). To be equally effective, a revolver shooter needs AT LEAST as much training and practice as a semi-auto shooter, and many folks need MORE TRAINING to get even with the slide-cyclers. Nobody thinks that owning a guitar makes you a musician, but an awful lot of people seem to think you’re ready for most any defensive scenario if you own a revolver and a box of ammo.

      • In better than 50 years of doing this every time I go to the range I see folks tapping and racking and banging on their semi auto’s. Every damn time. Fumbled and dropped mags out of the gun. Often enough that it gets noticed by me.

        Add to that how many 1 shot fights for their lives because a semi auto went out of battery in a struggle with a bad guy?

        How accurate do you have to be when the bad guy is sitting on top of you banging your head on the sidewalk.

        We’re talking real, down and dirty life and death. Not some hollywood nakatomi towers fantasy.

        In that 50 years you know how many non ammo related malfunctions I’ve seen on the range with a revolver? On anything better than an RG? 1. A mod. 19 S&W that broke mid string.

        And I’m not going into my military experience. Other than to say I would not trust my life to an m16.

        A dgu is going to be at arms length. Grappling will likely be going on.

        Remember the gun fighting jeweler in LA. His own blood caused his Sig to jam. He dropped it and finished with a S&W revolver.

        Want foolproof. Carry 2 revolvers.

        • “A dgu is going to be at arms length. Grappling will likely be going on.”

          Ditto, amen, and what he said.

          I would add “for a civilian”. For cops and military (or even some home defense situations) a full sized semi-auto has more and better pros vs. cons. The key is distance and (potential) number of enemies. I don’t want a sub nosed .38 as my primary handgun in western Iraq and I would rather have a .38 snubby against 1 guy in a stairwell. They are 2 different fights. And where grappling goes on – manually powered firearms (usually revolvers here) are inherently more reliable. And I state that as a guy who does not own a revolver.

          “Want foolproof. Carry 2 revolvers.”

          . . . and a blade 🙂

        • When I’m at home I carry a j frame in my pocket for immediate accrss to a gun. But i also have two 12 ga. pump guns presighted. One upstairs and one downstairs.

          I very much agree that different guns serve different purposes. If I was soldiering again or had become a cop I would want the latest and greatest semi auto holster gun on my hip.

  4. The claim that “Tap, Rack. . . should usually work” to clear double-feeds and other failure to extracts is dubious, particularly on the AR which was the example used in the article. In my experience, just racking the slide only causes another round to get caught up in the jam-up, and often makes the jam much worse, to the point where you can’t clear it with your fingers and need some kind of pry tool. Even for a pistol, the main reason you get a double feed (as in the first picture in the article) is because of a failure to extract, so there’s a shell in the chamber, and another trying to go in. Racking without first removing the magazine in this instance would never extract the brass in the chamber, and would just keep replicating the double feed. You have to remove the magazine, then rack-rack-rack to eject the problematic round, then reinsert the magazine, rack and go.

    So you need to have two different malfunction-clearing solutions that you practice often enough that they are second nature: The Tap-Rack AND the Double-Feed / Mag Rip-Rack-Rack. And you have to practice enough with dummy rounds AND manufactured double feeds so that you learn to quickly assess what your problem actually is. Generally, if you pull the trigger and the hammer falls–you get a click, no bang–then you can tap rack because that means the gun was actually back in battery. You’ve either got a dud or empty chamber. But if the trigger is just dead when you try and fire, then you’re not in battery and you’re in slide lock (out of ammo), or you’ve got a double feed or stovepipe or some other failure to feed. With a pistol you can clear the stove pipe by just brushing it off as noted by other commentors, but on a rifle you’re gonna need to treat it same as a double feed and Mag Rip-Rack.

    • I’d also add that while it’s important to develop a proficiency with ‘tap, rack, bang’ clearing skills, while on the range a beginner (or seasoned shooter) should take their time assessing failures. For two purposes: education, and safety.

      When time is not a factor ‘tap, rack, bang” can cause MUCH more serious problems if the failure was induced by a squib. If ‘tap, rack, bang’ turns into ‘tap, rack, BOOM’ you’re really gonna have a bad day.

    • Standard IA (Immediate Action) in the Canadian Army was do assess the position of the bolt by looking in the ejection port. If the bolt is partially back, then lock it all the way back, remove the mag and clear the jam (rotate and shake), replace the mag, release the bolt, hit the forward assist and continue firing. That works pretty well for a double feed or similar malfunction, and can be done very quickly with practice.

  5. I was always under the impression that the “Assess” portion of the drill, was assessing the gun for any continued malfunction, not the assessing the target area.

    Also, Tap, Rack & Assess will NOT fix that double feed (as pictured).

    You should probably also mention that a Click and No Pop, can be followed fairly quickly with an unexpected POP!

  6. Isn’t removing the magazine always the first step in any failure assessment? Especially for beginners. That way they can fully reassess what’s going on. What’s in and what’s out, and what just got corrected. Instead of being surprised/confused by a bullet being in the chamber already after clearing.

    • For beginners, I would say putting the weapon on safe (If applicable) removing the magazine and completely clearing it would be good.

      Once you get more time on a gun, tap rack all the way.

  7. Complete BS

    The gun clicks and you just tap rack?

    If you by any means do not want to observe the ejection port, or the lighting condition is too poor, the default action is to reload, unless the gun malfs more than once per mag.

    And the gun stovepipes you still tap rack?

    Unless the action didnt pick up a round, this is the best way to get a doublefeed on guns not designed to be controlled-feed.

    Stop spreading the tap-rack BS. The only place where it’s useful is when the gun clicks, you observe and see a closed or almost closed ejection port with nothing sticking out. And btw this still doesnt work on an dirty AR. A “push on forward assist” is needed before the rack. Same applies to various pistols depending on the specifics

  8. Generally, the first thing you do is wait about ten seconds with the gun pointed safely downrange to insure you are not having a hangfire. Next, I always remove the magazine when any of these things happen. The tension of the mag spring forcing up remaining rounds tends to bind up the slide or bolt. Once the mag is removed you should be able to rack the slide or bolt once or twice and clear the jam. If you think you have chambered a live round, I would pull the slide or bolt back to the hold open position, eject the live round and put it back into the mag, then make sure the barrel is clear, reinsert the mag and cycle a round into the chamber.

    All that being said, these NRA procedures are for when you are in a stress situation and need to get the gun cleared ASAP. They are effective for stress situations and worth practicing (with dummy rounds). When at the Range for practice take a little more time and a few extra steps to insure your safety and that of others.

  9. I would be interested in a poll of how many people have experienced a hang fire outside of old military surplus rifles and ammo. I have never had one with any of my firearms, and I don’t know any fellow shooters who have.

    • Never actually had one myself.
      But yknow, one of those “duds” racked out couldve exploded and didnt get noticed with so much gunfire going on.

      If this pertains to revolvers. Methinks even there is a hangfire, keep firing at somebody actually aiming at your head is still more important. And this will not be enough of a reason for those who are factually better served with revolvers to switch to autoloaders. There are bigger problems wheelgunners need to address before this one

    • And how many hang fires are where the cartridge detonates like a second or less after being hit by the firing pin? I have heard of hang fires happening in and because of extreme cold but the round goes off milliseconds after being struck. Besides hang fires are uncommon to the point of rare.

      And I do not see where using a revolver verses a semi-auto pistol makes it that much worse. A hang fire could mess things up royally for a pistol every bit as much as a revolver. And I could see where in a revolver a hang fire would simply fire the bullet out of the chamber without the barrel. That is bad for sure but in a DG situation not that bad.

  10. Ok this malfunction thing I wanna set the record straight.

    Common and not-that-uncommon malfunctions only happen in these ways.

    First off I do not assume that i can tell between a click and a mushy trigger. Secondly i do not count on feeling the lock-back after the last round. If you can, well, you’re biologically superior and my words do not deserve your reading. The gun supposedly has last round lock open and a means to force the action into battery. (AK guys, old school HK guys i cant help you)

    In proper lighting conditions:

    1: click, observe, see a closed or almost closed ejection port. Tap mag (to correct the cartridge column or improper seating) – forward assist (slam the forward assist device or the back of the slide. Hammer fired pistols will hurt but it’s cheaper than your life. To make sure the extractor is over the rim) – rack(feed a new round).Rationale: it could be a dud; there may or may not be a round fed; the bolt couldve been slowed enough to stop just short of in battery which does not permit extraction especially on an AR.

    2: click, observe, see a stovepipe that is removable by the hand. Remove stovepipe – hit forward assist (there may or may not be a round feeding below the stovepipe, and the extractor may or may not be over the rim if there is) – rack (feed a new round).

    3: click, observe, see a wide open ejection port. It could be a failure to extract (extractor lost grip), a true doublefeed (top round slid off the feedlips into the chamber due to inertia, the second round picked up by the bolt), an inline stovepipe (stovepipe but unremovable by hand quickly). What to do: rip the mag (remove the possible defective mag, keep it if it’s the only one) – rack once (should the top round the mag just got ripped off and now hanging between the slide and chamber) – rack again (remove the case/cartridge in the chamber) – reload.

    If the lighting doesnt permit observation into the ejection port. Default to a reload as the gun malfunctions less than once per mag. If after the reload the gun wont fire, or the mag wont even go in at all, default to doublefeed drill, with the new magazine retained.

    If two malfunction drills above correctly applied in a row do not solve the problem, you have a squib or a sheared-off extractor claw / case rim. For the squib, if it’s hunting or competition, STOP. If it’s life and death, I say keep doing the drills, a possible blown barrel is safer than an aimed shot from the other side of the argument. For the latter, mortaring or cleaning rod.

  11. Had a Beretta Nano that would double feed all the time and it was a huge pain to clear because it had no slide lock to relieve the spring pressure help drop the magazine. I should add that when it double fed, the empty casing was still fully in the chamber, so not tap rack drill would work. End of rant.

    • That’s the *stereotypical* Beretta Nano jam (just like having the bullet hung up on the feed ramp is the stereotypical crap-quality 1911 jam). I’ve seen plenty of both.

      Beats me how the hell the empty case is still in the chamber yet the slide has gone back to get the next round. Even if the extractor is bunged up somehow, the case ought to have gone back with the slide.

    • This is the only type of stoppage that I have experienced in both a Ruger SR9c and a Taurua TCP. Steel case Russian ammo. Absolutely had to drop the mag and wrestle the slide back. Glad both have slide stops. These experiences have made me stop buying steel case except for the AK. The remaining couple boxes of 9mm steel will be shot out of a HiPoint carbine and then I will use brass even with it.

  12. What would happen if a delayed discharge in a revolver went off after you shot the next round? This round would be partially blocked in the cylinder when it went off. Couldn’t this possibly blow up the gun or cause serious injury? How likely is this to happen?

    • Very unlikely and unless the chamber lined up with the frame it would shoot the bullet out like a pepperbox. If it hit the frame you might be in some serious hurt but you might not. I will defer to crazy gun smart old dudes who probably have had this happen (or know someone who did).

    • lol that was educational with a funny yet realistic automatic fix to any malfunction at the end. Sure does make the case for a back up.

  13. These comments on here just solidified my belief that this is at least one of the best and probably the best sight for genuine gun information.

  14. Click no bang, trigger pull no bang, heave that sucker as far away from you as possible. Polymar pistols excell here,

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