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You’re looking at an 1848 Colt Baby Dragoon Rammerless pistol that’s been put on the block by gunauction.org. But what’s notable about this little heater isn’t what it is so much as to whom it once belonged. This wheel gun belonged at one time to James Brady. Yes, that James Brady. As the auction notes spell out, “Right after the (Reagan assassination attempt in which Brady was injured), James Brady’s wife, Sarah, was so revolted by firearms that she gathered all of the guns in the Brady household and turned to the first trusted person who would take them from her — her gardener.” And that made one of our readers recoil, so to speak . . .

I’m all in for buying unusual things. Especially firearms. But this?
At first I was kind of revolted/angry. Then I thought of where the proceeds went.
Then I was still revolted…

The current bid for the little .31 caliber Colt is $1505. Given the gun’s history and progeny, if you had the scratch, would you buy it?  [h/t Tom in Oregon]

42 Responses to Question of the Day: Would You Buy James Brady’s Gun?

  1. Perhaps Sarah should have been more disgusted with her whackjob husband than the inanimate tools he used. I guess crazy is attracted to crazy.

    But no, I wouldn’t have any interest in that gun.

  2. I would buy the pistol, his piss stained wheelchair, the thousands of pens usama has used for his countless executive orders/actions, pelosi’s personal AR-15, ted kennedys pickled liver , bill and monicas cigar and any other libtard/commie trinkets I could and start a new museum of evil.

  3. yes, I have the scratch, but would buy it only it I could let Ted Nugent shove it up Sarah’s cold dead As$

  4. If I had the money, sure I would be interested. While not very exciting, or even interesting, by itself, there is a story attached to it. The story makes it interesting.

    Having said that…. I would have to have the kind of money where I wouldn’t care about dropping that kind of coin on something interesting. The kind of money where two or three grand is pocket change.

  5. I would buy it as a collectable firearm ONLY if the price was good for that particular type and vintage of firearm. It’s prior history doesn’t matter to me nor would it increase or decrease its value to me.

    It’s an object.

    • I agree. If I was in the market for one of those, and found the price reasonable, I would buy it. Both Sarah and Jim Brady are deceased, and they haven’t owned this gun for more than 30 years. I mean, there are lots of us who own surplus guns that were once issued to or owned by worse people, like SS men, or Stalin era Soviet death squads, without even knowing it. They’re just tools, they don’t have souls.

  6. I would buy it under the following conditions (if I even wanted it);

    1. Is the money the gun will bring going to the “cause” or going to the current owner (since it appears to have been through several owners since being sold). If the former, I would buy it, if the latter I wouldn’t.

    2. Is the value they are selling it for considered reasonable for the gun itself or because of who owned it? I would not care about who owned it, only the gun.

    • The Second Amendment Foundation gets a portion of the the proceeds. Click on the link in the article.

      “A portion of The Brady Gun’s final auctioned price will be donated by its current owner Jim Copley and GunAuction.com to the Second Amendment Foundation, which constantly strives to undo that which this gun’s previous owner has done to limit our freedoms.”

  7. No. But only because I have no interest in collecting museum pieces. I love history and historic firearms. But books and the web are much cheaper and don’t require me to buy any more safes.

  8. “I’d flatten it with a sledgehammer” –whatsisname regarding OJs Heisman during the civil suit

  9. What a b*tch. If that happened to me I’d divorce her ass and sue her for the money she owed me.

  10. I would if could get an affidavit on the provenance. If for nothing else but to prove what hypocrites they are for wanting every person backgrounded on every transfer. Also to prove her gardener was more trustworthy than his lawyer or even Al Haig both better choices than the gardener

  11. No interest. I’m also an antique dealer and don’t see any real value. I hope the gardener makes some $-glad it’s not going to the evil be-otch’s estate

  12. What progeny?

    It has a history, but so far as I kmow it hasn’t done anything of note.

    Perhaps the author meant provenance?

    Perhaps; interesting conversation piece, anyway.

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