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The CZ Scorpion for this review was provided by Kentucky Gun Company

My favorite SMG of all time is the Škorpion vz. 61. It’s not the prettiest or the most powerful, but it’s an absolute joy to shoot and (much like the AR-15) is a bare-essentials kind of gun. Nothing was added that didn’t need to be there. When I heard that CZ was coming out with a new version of the Scorpion updated for 2015 I was extremely interested, and the instant one of our regular suppliers mentioned they had one in stock I was all over that like a fat kid on a Twinkie. Pistol caliber carbines are so hot right now, and if the Scorpion EVO 3 S1 lives up to the hype it could be a top contender for those looking for something to SBR . . .

The new Scorpion EVO 3 is very nearly a completely different beast from that original 1960s invention. The two firearms share a common operating system (direct gas blowback) and a common manufacturer…and that’s where the common features end. This new gun has been modernized in every way imaginable.

The predominant manufacturing material here is plastic, not metal. OK, the technical term is “fiber reinforced polymer,” but “plastic fantastic” just sounds better. The outer shell, trigger/magazine assembly, and grip are all made from high grade polymer instead of the stamped sheet metal and bakelite of yesteryear.

The barrel and trigger pack are still metal (cold hammer forged in the case of the barrel, which is actually impressive), as is the massive bolt that keeps this thing running, but every part that could be molded or cast in plastic has been. Normally I bemoan the presence of plastic in a firearm, but in this case it looks like they’ve done a remarkably good job with the design ensuring that the frame is strong enough for regular use, but light enough to be carried around.

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Another major change is the addition of Picatinny rails over every inch of available space. There’s a full length top rail for mounting optics or sling accessories, and while the handguard is a separate molding from the receiver, the top rail flows seamlessly from one to the next. At the front and back of that rail are some custom low-profile rail mounted sights, which are actually pretty nice and easy to use.

The adjustments on the rear are simple and firm, and the front sight works like any other AR-15 or AK-47 in the world. The gun also ships with a hand stop at the end of the bottom rail to keep shooters from putting their hand too close to the business end of the firearm, which is definitely an appreciated addition.

Speaking of appreciated additions, there’s an MP5-style charging handle setup on the gun. As on the MP5, the charging handle is not permanently attached to the bolt, allowing the gun to cycle without the charging handle moving at all. There’s also a similar cutout at the rear of the charging handle’s travel allowing the shooter to park the charging handle for unloading the gun or malfunction drills. Slapping it downwards releases the bolt in a satisfying 80’s action movie kind of way.

Since the “charging handle” on the old Scorpion was little more than a pair of ridged nubs on either side of the gun, the updated version definitely improves the operation. I’d complain that the charging handle is only on one side, but at the push of a pin you can easily swap it from one side to the other.

Out front, the barrel comes threaded from the factory. In states that still fully observe civil liberties and individual freedoms you’ll be able to remove the muzzle device on the front of the gun and substitute whatever muzzle device you choose, from an obnoxious brake to a polite and effective suppressor. Well, you could, if anything in the United States was threaded 18x1mm RH. The more common thread pitch for 9mm stuff is 1/2×28 inches (as on an AR-15) or even 5/8×24 (like the AR-10) but alas the Scropion’s is neither.

That means you’ll need a custom adapter to mount your can of choice. Liberty Suppressors has apparently already worked one up for this gun. The barrel length on the gun is a touch over 7 inches, meaning that the 9mm bullet will be traveling a little quicker than from your GLOCK 19 and the gas pressure at the muzzle should be slightly reduced due to the longer dwell time. Whether this will actually make the gun quieter is yet to be seen, especially with that chunky metal operating system.

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Moving a little further back on the gun we arrive that the fire controls. There’s definitely some more MP5 influence here, specifically in the shape of the safety selector switch. The magazine release is a very European design, too, as it’s integrated into the trigger guard. The inclusion of some ergonomic shaping around the release as well as some ridges make it relatively easy to use and easy to hit. Coming from the more traditional button-based release on other guns there is a learning curve to using the device properly, but it works pretty well as engineered. As with all magazine releases of this type I always worry a bit about a finger slipping onto the trigger accidentally, though.

The bolt release may be secondary (the charging handle works perfectly well in this role), but it’s massive. Compared to an AR-15 paddle this is about three times the size. The difference is that with an AR-15 you push the button to release the bolt, and here you are pulling down on the tab instead. This keeps the profile of the gun slimmer (since there’s nothing sticking out from the side), but might be hard to use in an emergency as that pulling motion is more complex than a simple paddle press. Then again, that’s what the charging handle is for.

The grip is a little on the small side for me, but admittedly I have massive hands. At the moment there’s only one grip available for the gun, but given that it’s extremely easy to swap out (there’s one readily accessible bolt holding it in place) I’m betting that replacement grips will be available sometime in the future.

Installed from the factory on the left side of the gun is a sling loop. There are a couple alternate locations on the gun to mount this loop if that location doesn’t meet standards, or there’s an entire top rail to use if you want to go that route. Either way, weapons retention is definitely something that CZ thought about and included in their design from the beginning.

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The last major change is the magazine. The EVO 3 uses its own proprietary mags. This is both a blessing and a curse. The magazines seem to reliably feed into the gun and are definitely pretty to look at, but since there’s currently so little demand for them I wouldn’t hold my breath for replacement magazines being easy to find (or reasonably priced) for quite some time.

As a small aside about the magazines, they’re the reason that there are no stock kits currently available from CZ. Jeremy S. appears to have gotten his hands on something similar, but CZ is holding off on providing any to the market. The problem is that pesky 922(r) compliance issue — since the pistol is made overseas by the CZ mothership and imported, adding a stock to the gun might make it illegal to own as an “imported evil assault rifle.”

Word is that CZ is waiting on an American manufacturer to start putting out American-made magazines so that the gun can be 922(r) compliant before they release any stocks, which is a pretty responsible thing to do actually. It would be better if they made a couple parts in the USA to begin with, but this is only the first production run after all. MSRP on supplemental factory 30 round magazines is rumored to be $19.95, BTW.

Taking the gun apart is actually not too bad. As Jeremy shows, there’s not much to it. As a note, Jeremy’s gun came with a stock adapter in the box as well as a buffer tube, but I got no such present in my box (Jeremy got his directly from CZ, I got ours from our friends at Kentucky Gun Co.). Apparently the plan is for CZ to sell the buffer tube and adapter separately in the future, but Jeremy got the added special sauce in the box for asking nicely.

What’s particularly notable from this video is how simple the disassembly process is — no non-captured bolts or springs to worry about, and very few parts to lose on the kitchen counter. High marks for ease of use, but with the grip still attached it might be tough to get into all the nooks and crannies of the gun for cleaning.

Speaking of stock kits, the rear plate is laughably easy to remove. The design is similar to a SCAR stock, but there’s a button in the center of the plate that needs to be depressed for it to slide free of the gun. It looks like a hex screw when you shine a light on it, but trust me it’s just a detent you need to push down to slide the plate off.

Out on the range, the gun feels pretty good. The plastic shell is somewhat slick, but there’s enough grip to make me happy that it isn’t going to fly out of my hand. The forward hand stop is definitely a helpful addition. It not only makes holding the gun with two hands easier and more comfortable, but also makes it easy to hook onto barricades and such for stability. Even holding it with one hand, the gun balances well and doesn’t feel uncomfortable to hold.

Until you flip off the safety.

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The safety selector switch on this gun is ambidextrous, meaning that the large paddle that allows your thumb to depress it on one side is also present on the other. The design is basically identical to the old MP5 safety, except that on the MP5 the selector is mounted far above the shooter’s hand. With the safety position on the EVO 3, when the safety is flipped to the “off” position, the paddle digs into the trigger finger of your shooting hand. And when you fire the gun, that paddle is hammered into your flesh and beats on your bone.

I have to be honest here, this design feature made the gun physically painful to fire. I thought I might be doing something wrong so I consulted the manual, but there was nothing in there regarding my situation. I get the feeling that this is a result of actually using the gun as a pistol when it was designed as an SBR/SMG with the expectation that it would have a stock.

Without the stock all the weight from the back of the pistol is supported by your firing hand. Consequently all of that recoil is transmitted to that hand (and directly into your finger). With a stock, this shouldn’t be an issue, but as a pistol this is a huge problem. It made me stop shooting after two magazines because it hurt so much. I asked a couple other people at the range to try the gun and they all reported the same thing.

My recommendation for those who want to buy this gun: judicious application of a Dremel tool. There aren’t any replacement safety selectors available yet, and you’ll want to shave yours down until an alternate is available.

On the bright side, recoil is pretty tame and controllable, but I confess I was focusing more on the sharp pain in my trigger finger at the time.

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Accuracy is acceptable. Shooting this gun as a pistol is decidedly harder than it looks, but once you get a stock on this puppy it should be accurate enough for a PDW.

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The problem with this version of the Scorpion is that it’s being sold as a pistol. The gun was designed to use a stock, and while it can legally be sold as a pistol it should probably only ever be sold as a do-it-yourself SBR kit. The ergonomics make a lot more sense as a rifle or SBR, and certain painful design features can be avoided when using it as the original designers intended.

I applaud CZ for shipping it as a pistol so that we can enjoy it while waiting for our Form 1 to come back, but that’s not the definitive form of this gun. This Scorpion needs a stock to work properly, and with a stock this would be a rocking awesome PDW or pistol caliber carbine. Without a stock, it desperately needs a different safety lever.

Specifications: CZ Scorpion EVO 3 S1 Pistol

Caliber: 9mm Parabellum
Action: Semi-auto
Barrel: 7.72 inches, 18x1mm RH thread
Weight: 5.0 lbs
Length: 16.1 Inches
Magazine: Proprietary 20 round
MSRP: $849
Websitehttp://cz-usa.com/product/cz-scorpion-evo-3-s1-pistol/

Ratings (out of five stars):

Accuracy: * * * *
The pain keeps small groups from appearing. Plus, as a pistol the thing is a bit awkward and chunky to hold.

Ergonomics: * 
I can’t remember another firearm I’ve tested that has inflicted physical pain on me as I was shooting it. Even the Armalite AR-50 was a pleasure to shoot as long as you were behind it and not to the side. That can all be fixed on the Scorpion with a stock, though.

Reliability: * * * * *
No issues. Hundreds of painful rounds later with no cleaning in the Texas dust and she still works like a Swiss clock. Or Czech. Or whatever.

Customization: * * * *
Swapping the butt plate for a stock adapter is dead simple. The rails all over the gun make it easy to attach whatever you want, from a red dot to a Mr. Coffee. The only issue is the thread pitch on the barrel, which means no commercially available silencer will fit on it.

Overall: * * *
Let me put this in perspective. For $50 more than MSRP, you can buy an Uzi pistol that has none of the ergonomic problems and comes in a smaller package. If you’re looking for a high capacity direct blowback 9mm, that’s your ticket. But if you’re looking to SBR this gun, then you’ve chosen wisely — the POF MP5 clones are massively more expensive. The SIG SAUER MPX still hasn’t hit store shelves, but will apparently be priced about twice as much. And while MasterPiece Arms is getting on the right track, their MAC-10 like pistols just aren’t my speed. Keep in mind that we review guns based on how they come from the factory, not based on how they could possibly be configured.

The CZ Scorpion for this review was provided by Kentucky Gun Company

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63 Responses to Gun Review: CZ Scorpion EVO 3 S1 Pistol

  1. Looks like a fun range toy.

    However, speaking only for myself (and specifically not my wife), if I’m going to drop a kilobuck on a range toy it will likely be a Roger Rabbit gun, aka a 460 S&W as reviewed a few days back.

    OTOH if the Skorpion came chambered in 45ACP said wife might get one for herself…

    • I know a lot of folks shy away from NFA items for home defense purposes, but with a stock and a suppressor I think this is a great choice for HD. 30 rounds (when the $19.95, 30-round mags become available… 20 rnds now) of 147 grn HST in a stable, easy-to-shoot, maneuverable platform that allows for the mounting of an optic and other gadgets and is hearing safe to shoot inside…

      But it ain’t so bad as a range toy and 9mm is still one of the least expensive centerfire cartridges to enjoy in a range toy.

      • Yeah, but then you have the legal issues to contend with. Unfortunately, HD firearm choice needs to be at least partially influenced by the fact that you WILL be charged with murder (unless you live in Colorado, where out Castle Doctrine specifically states that we are completely IMMUNE from prosecution if we use deadly force in our own homes). If you shot the scumbag with a simple 12 gauge pump, well, that’s a very politically correct option. On the other hand, use a suppressed SBR (and I agree, that is probably the best option for HD), and the prosecution will bring in “experts” to testify that it is a “military special operations weapon” and use that to paint you as a crazy vigilante who wanted nothing more than to kill someone.

        • I understand that a lot of folks feel this way, I just disagree entirely. Especially with your assertion right off the bat that you “WILL be charged with murder.” That is just patently not the case at all. Not in any state, let alone the vast majority of them with versions of castle doctrines.

        • I don’t understand all the assassin/operator **** that gunners fret about, when NFA items are brought up for HD use. Seems kinda FUDDish to me.

        • Do we have any documented cases where this happened? Even here in Illinois, castle doctrine still applies.

        • Uhhhh no. Please provide a documented case that a DGU with a suppressor prompted the DA to apply a harsher charge. I could see the defense lawyer demanding that the jury be subjected to a test firing (without ear protection) of the un-supressed and suppressed rifle in an enclosed 10×10 room and then asking the jury which they preferred.

        • What makes you believe that Colorado is unique in that regard? Here’s what we have in Washington, for example:

          RCW 9A.16.110

          Defending against violent crime — Reimbursement.
          (1) No person in the state shall be placed in legal jeopardy of any kind whatsoever for protecting by any reasonable means necessary, himself or herself, his or her family, or his or her real or personal property, or for coming to the aid of another who is in imminent danger of or the victim of assault, robbery, kidnapping, arson, burglary, rape, murder, or any other violent crime as defined in RCW 9.94A.030.

          (2) When a person charged with a crime listed in subsection (1) of this section is found not guilty by reason of self-defense, the state of Washington shall reimburse the defendant for all reasonable costs, including loss of time, legal fees incurred, and other expenses involved in his or her defense. This reimbursement is not an independent cause of action. To award these reasonable costs the trier of fact must find that the defendant’s claim of self-defense was sustained by a preponderance of the evidence. If the trier of fact makes a determination of self-defense, the judge shall determine the amount of the award.

      • “I think this is a great choice for HD”

        I agree; I do feel an AR is better, but that’s if you don’t have a hard time using an AR because of the extra weight (2-3 pounds more and spread out over a wide area instead of in a tight little package) or location of the controls (particularly the charging handle) like a lot of women and older people might.

        • I have a small house with narrow hallways. A full-size AR is entirely too large to maneuver around in such tight spaces. I’m not alone in this, either. It’s why I use a pistol for home defense–it might not be the most effective weapon, but it’s the least unwieldy choice available to me. Better to have a less effective weapon I can point and aim than a better one that I can’t.

        • Fire a 5.56 inside without ear pro, suppressed or not, and you’ll wish you hadn’t. Well, suppressed you’ll wish you hadn’t and not suppressed you’ll be deaf. A suppressed AR in subsonic .300 BLK would be different. But I’d still want it short (whether that meant SBR or integrally-suppressed barrel that hit 16″ in length). And .300 BLK subsonic can be a great round with the proper projectiles but I think I actually lean towards 9mm or .45 ACP for indoor use instead, if for no other reason than I think a simple blowback action like the Scorpion’s is quieter and more reliable than a direct gas impingement .300 BLK AR…

          Give me ear protection and a short rifle (e.g. the Tavor or an SBR) and, sure, I’d rather have a 5.56 in my hand were it needed to save my life than a pistol caliber. And my Tavor has lived in the HD firearm spot (with suppressor) sometimes.

      • Jeremy,

        Good points but our HD needs are already filled, so this would for us be a range toy.

        Re avoiding NFA items in general, you can’t deny it is a hassle. And for suppressors at least, it feels like I’d be a generation or two behind by the time my tax stamp comes through. Maybe I’ve been too iPhoned for my own good, though.

      • As a home defense gun, this doesn’t do anything a KelTec Sub2000 doesn’t do. For 1/4 the price, once you SBR it.

        I’m not saying Its not worth the premium. But for a HD gun, I tend towards effective and cheap. The KelTec I used to own was 100% reliable, and with a 30 round Glock mag, carried a lot of firepower. I sold my $275 KelTec on GB in 2013 auction prices crept over $800. Now I’m waiting for the Gen 2 version I saw at SHOT. It fixes most of the problems with the gun.

        With that said, I fully intend to purchase a Scorpion and a Sig MPx sometime soon, compare them and keep whichever I like more. I see these guns more as a competitor to a SBR AR15 in 9mm.

        The KelTec will remain just about the best truck and HD carbine out there.

        Don

  2. Nick,

    You mentioned you filled a Form 1 for the Scorpion.
    What would the OAL be? And since CZ/ATF has yet to decide on their actual stock would you be using the aforementioned stock adapter and buffer tube from CZ and just slapping on a AR style buttstock on it?

    • Oh hey sorry to jump in here, but as I was just taking a bit of a breakfast break and saw your comment I figured I’d reply RE what I did on my Form 1 for the Scorpion Evo 3 S1…

      I decided on what AR-15 buttstock I want on it (U.S.-made, just in case) and calculated the overall length of the Scorpion with the stock adapter seen here and that AR stock on it, and that’s what went on my Form 1. If, down the road, CZ is able to sell the actual Scorpion Evo stock, either due to making it in the U.S. or getting approval from the ATF or whatever, I may consider switching to it. It definitely looks good on the Evo. Or, I’m guessing the aftermarket will come out with a slick folding stock adapter for the Evo and I may stick with the AR buttstock I chose (and love) and swap the mount so it can fold.

      I think the Evo has 12 key parts that are foreign-made when the ATF requires a maximum of 10 for 922r compliance. IF full compliance of turning this pistol into an SBR is necessary. I’m just going to assume it is to be safe. Swapping the magazine baseplate and follower would get you to the 10 maximum. Swapping the pistol grip to something U.S.-made would take you to 9 so you’ve got a little fudge factor. If a U.S. company makes complete magazines then you’re down even further on the number. So here’s to hoping we’ll be able to purchase U.S.-made magazines and a U.S. made pistol grip. Magpul, you out there??? 🙂

      • A US made trigger pack would work as well. We will probably see that before US made mags.

        I wouldn’t be surprised though if in the next few years, CZ-USA starts making some of the parts here in the US so they can sell a carbine version.

        • It’s my understanding that CZ-USA doesn’t have production/manufacturing capabilities other than Dan Wesson’s. Unless the volume of Scorpions, Brens, and other rifles CZ wants to start selling in the U.S. looks like it’s going to be high enough to justify the massive expense of tooling up a manufacturing facility, my guess is they’ll contract other companies to make these sorts of parts in the U.S. to CZ’s specs and with CZ’s name on them. Lots of the companies we know and love will white label in this way. As an example of the actual manufacturing way to do it, I *believe* IWI US ramped up its own production facilities to manufacture the necessary number of items in the U.S. to make the Tavor 922r compliant.

          With CZ-USA manufacturing and branding its own firearm for the first time ever, though, (the 1911 A1) it has certainly taken a step in the direction of making its own products.

          …and yeah, a U.S.-made trigger group would go a long way towards compliance since trigger housing, trigger, hammer, sear, and disconnector are all listed separately as 922r items and each one counts towards your 10…

          27 C.F.R. 478.39 lists 20 parts and you can have a maximum of 10:

          (1) Frames, receivers, receiver castings, forgings or stampings
          (2) Barrels
          (3) Barrel extensions
          (4) Mounting blocks (trunions)
          (5) Muzzle attachments
          (6) Bolts
          (7) Bolt carriers
          (8) Operating rods
          (9) Gas pistons
          (10) Trigger housings
          (11) Triggers
          (12) Hammers
          (13) Sears
          (14) Disconnectors
          (15) Butt stocks
          (16) Pistol grips
          (17) Forearms, hand guards
          (18) Magazine bodies
          (19) Followers
          (20) Floorplates

        • I contacted Timney yesterday, and the rep said there are no current plans to make an EVO 3 trigger, but they’re always looking for new platforms for their designs.

          @Jeremy, what length did you put for the OAL on your form 1? My Scorpion got on a UPS truck this morning, so I’ll be e-filing my form 1 next Monday night. I have an AR-15 carbine length tube and MOE+ on the way as well.

        • I’d say just don’t buy the buffer tube adapter from CZ until your Form 1 comes in. Just in case, RE constructive possession.

          Honestly, I’d rather not share the OAL I put in. I’m not using the stock that you’re planning on using and my “measurement” is only an educated guess based on measuring the mount adapter and knowing the actual dimensions of the stock I’m using (which includes its own buffer tube), etc. I don’t want to risk anybody plugging in the same OAL that I used and it being incorrect. I’d be happy to take measurements for you, though, and I’ll go ahead and put measurements for the buffer tube adapter in my review. CZ lists OAL for the S1 and I’ll do what I can to confirm or “update” that measurement with the rear plate adapter and the flash hider off of the pistol (since removable muzzle devices don’t count on the NFA stuff and the rear mount will be replaced with a different one when it’s SBR’d).

        • If you send the trigger pack to a company and they do work on it to improve the action does it change the classification to US made. I’d assume that the answer is NO.

          I hear some common complaints for the handgrip angle…seems like an easy place to rack up a US made part count.

          In the end, if you can get there with an improved made-from-scratch US trigger upgrade that would seem to solve the heavy trigger issue as well as the 922R business.

          You know someone is going to make a trigger upgrade because the potential sales will probably be a lot higher for this than a Tavor especially if it clears up the 922R issue.

  3. Do you think your hand size might be a factor in the gun being painful? Did sliding the grip help? I saw that it can be moved backward.

    For the price, even as a pistol, this looks like a pretty nice option for home defense and fun at the range. Shame about the finger biting.

  4. BTW can I just say this is what got me reading TTAG in the first place. I have now watched a handful of YouTube reviews and read a few internet reviews on the Scorpion Evo and so far none of them mentioned the right side safety lever issue. There’s no freaking way they didn’t experience what Nick did.

    It’s nearly impossible to have your finger on the trigger without the safety jabbing into it. I experimented on mine with the grip moved through its entire range of front-rear travel as well as during a horrifying and illegal dream in which I shouldered the SB15 brace to see if that made a difference, and it actually did help but only a tiny bit. Mine will be receiving the Dremel treatment after I do the “before” photos. No way around it.

    I won’t get into why people — those who write/film firearms reviews — hold their tongues, but I see this as an obvious instance of that happening. Except, of course, for TTAG, which is why so many of us come here first for gun & gear reviews…

    • I think Colion Noir mentioned it in his initial review (which is where I think the Evo 3 bandwagon started), but yes, I agree with you on TTAG’s overall integrity with respect to gun reviews. I only started getting into shooting a couple years ago, and it took me a while to realize the “respectable” dead tree gun mags were basically press releases from gun manufacturers. Even when I disagree with a writer here (which happens often enough), at least I can be certain it’s an honest disagreement.

  5. “Accuracy is acceptable. Shooting this gun as a pistol is decidedly harder than it looks”

    Does this include shooting it with one hand forward at the hand stop and another holding the grip, as well as shooting it with both hands on the grip like you would a handgun?

    Also, regarding the safety, I think I read that soon you’ll be able to remove one of them if you like with a kit or something.

    • It’s very easy to remove the one on the right side. But, it is needed to hold the safety bar in the frame so it would have to be replaced with something else for sure. Including a Dremeled-down version of itself 😉

    • I’ve decided that $200 to the man is cheaper than the tiny risk of $50k to a lawyer and 20(?) years at club fed, so I’m ditching my Sig Brace plans, and e-filing my Scorpion SBR as soon as I have a serial number.

        • Huh?

          I’m paying $200 so if a cop sees me shooting a pistol from the shoulder, he can’t arrest me for having an unregistered SBR. Here in WA, it’s a state felony (as well as a federal one) to possess an unregistered SBR, so if a local cop at a gun range sees me using it in a way the ATF now considers an SBR, he can arrest me. And a cop observing me doing something potentially illegal would be enough probable cause for a court to uphold checking my serial number with the ATF, so the 4th Amendment doesn’t apply.

          And no, I have no desire to be a test case.

        • What he’s referring to is that, if you are in possession of an NFA item, ATF can demand entrance to the place where you store it (i.e. your home) at any time, without a warrant, to ensure that you’re compliant with everything.

        • Not true.
          The ATF can show up to my home and demand to inspect an NFA item, and, legally, I must comply.
          The ATF cannot go inside and search my home without a warrant.

          I made sure of that before getting my first suppressor years ago.

        • That’s precisely the point. They cannot search it without you, but if you’re there they can demand entry without any warrant, and you have no recourse. So you do lose a large chunk of your constitutional protections.

        • This is completely false! These are totally unfounded rumors. The ATF can randomly inspect FFLs during stated business hours at the FFL’s premises. They cannot and will not show up at your home to inspect your NFA items. Ever. I suppose legally they could call you and ask if you wouldn’t mind letting them swing by and inspect your stuff and buy your wife dinner, but they cannot enter your home without a warrant. End of story. You give up ZERO rights by owning NFA-regulated items.

  6. This is the first review I have seen to confirm that the grip can be replaced. Hopefully an adapter will allow use of any AR grip, or at least something with a less extreme grip angle.

  7. One of my favorite firearm configurations is the camp carbine. I missed my chance to get an HK-94A3, but I did pick up an Uzi rifle (I hate the stock!). I also have an old Inland M1 Carbine with a Federal Ordnance under-folder on it that’s about perfect except for the oddball caliber.

    I like CZ, and if they were to offer the EVO 3 as a 16″ folding carbine I’d pick one up in a heartbeat.

  8. As far as a muzzle device goes, Witt machine does everything to customer spec. It’s not hard to program a CNC lathe to cut a metric thread, I can do that all day long.

  9. I would love to have one of these if I was able to install a folding/collapsible stock absent having to file more paperwork than an “illegal alien” must when entering Country (actually that’s not a good comparison as one of the aforementioned requires NO PAPERWORK and just a hint it ain’t the SBR/NFA stuff ;)…

    Now concerning what type of weapon is used in a HD deployment situation, I too hear all of the countless “warnings” about using that “scary” looking firearm be it a Vepr-12 instead of a traditional Pump etc. I and also have yet to see a single documented case where the homeowner were found to be guilty of that dreaded “RamboIsm” and, therefore, scheduled to Extra time…

  10. I got one.
    I hate it.
    I shoot a pistol right handed.
    I shoot a rifle left handed, cause I lost my right eye.
    I can’t have “either or” safety on this gun, without killing my hand.

  11. back to hating it….
    I would love this little gun if not for the safety.
    Let’s say I only shot it like a rifle; left handed, so now none of my tight handed friends could enjoy shooting my gun.
    Plus I hold this thing both right and left handed, cause of my right eye being blind.
    I feel screwed out of a chunk of change. I’ve owned it 2 days and feel I have to get rid of it.
    Unacceptable CZ !!!

  12. Not hating as much today.
    I find all kinds of upgrades, including other safety types, for example an AK type safety is another option.
    I think I may just get past the hate, move on to love.
    Problem is, it cost money for what CZ should do included in the price of the gun.
    I’ll work with it for a period of time.

  13. I just came back from shooting all day.
    I wore a glove.
    OMG !!!
    I love this Scorpion!!!!
    Not For Sale!!!!
    I can’t wait to get a red dot on it.
    I’ve never had such a 180 degree opinion, after just one good day at the range.

  14. Harold,
    I just shot my son’s CZ and he put a new safety on it that easily flicks up and completely out of the way with your trigger finger. You’d love it.

  15. The shittyness of the trigger ruins this gun. Its one of the worst triggers ive ever shot. And overall the gun has to many flaws. Horrible as a pistol. Uncomfortable to shoot. Way more recoil than ita peers. And picatiny rails really very uncomfortable on hands without gloves. Grip angle just too agressive also. Even in sbr. Sure, it looks cool. But that doesnt always transfer over to it actuallu being a great design. Im glad i passed on this. Even at 800 bucks.

  16. I’m very disappointed in this gun and CZ. The top rail broke off a 2 teeth section on the right side (serial number side), called CZ and they said sorry, we can’t help you. This gun was purchased 6/3/2016, so it’s just over a month old. I’m not sure how it broke but in my opinion, a month old gun should not be breaking anywhere and a manufacturer should definitely be standing behind their product. This is marketed as a rugged firearm, obviously not! I own several CZ products and this experience is making me rethink ownership. I have had 2 other issues with firearms, Sig Sauer and FN. Both of those companies were great and took care of my issue right away. Beware of CZ products, CZ will not stand behind it! There are several other posts just like mine from bad customer service experiences. Oh yeah, the trigger is horrible

  17. I have owned the Scorpion for almost 2 years and over 2000 rds down the barrel and the firearm is definitely in my top 3 in my vault. Only complaint I have are these damn mags, out of 20 30-rd mags 9 of them have broken feed lips. The funny part is they don’t break while in use and they don’t break when you mag drop them on the ground at the range they break loaded in the damn vault. The simple fact that the feed lips crack under pressure of being loaded, when I discovered this I loaded one 30-rd mag with 28 rds in it and it took 3 months until a stress crack appeared. Mind you CZ took care of the mags but really where is the quality? If I didn’t spend the extra money and time to SBR it I would’ve tossed it to the waste side but I love this platform so much I can’t let her go. It’s sorta like trying to get rid of a cheating wife that you love…P.S. I can’t wait to suppress this beast!!

  18. I just bought one . I replaced the safety with one from HD industries took 5 minutes works great.
    Also bought a folding arm brace with plastic blade .
    Gun shoots very accurately and no
    Malfunctions with over 1000 rounds now .
    I bought some nice rail covers on amazon .
    I also bought a new trigger spring haven’t installed it yet to reduce trigger pull. I love the gun and glad I can buy 9mm at .17 cents a round .

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