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The official word came a few weeks back: AAC as we know it is closing shop. Remington fired just about all of the employees, and is moving production to their new factory in Alabama. Now we’re starting to see the first trickles of AAC refugees making their way into other companies, and Brent Taylor seems to be leading the way. A former sales guy for AAC, he’s taking charge of sales for the smaller silencer shop Liberty Suppressors. Presser after the jump . . .

TRENTON, GA- Liberty Sound Suppressors is pleased to announce the addition of Brent Taylor as National Sales Manager. “Liberty is undergoing a period of unprecedented growth and the addition of Brent to the Liberty family as National Sales Manager will go a long way toward helping us expand, both now and in the future” says David Saylors, company president. Brent comes to Liberty with experience in the US Marine Corps, retail firearms and silencer sales, military sales and distribution and most recently as customer service/inside sales, social media and product demonstrator for Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC).

Brent will be the primary point of contact for Liberty dealers and distributors and will have a regular presence at industry trade shows, dealer events and demonstrations.

Liberty Suppressors was founded in 2006 by Dave and Teresa Saylors. Liberty is committed to crafting high quality firearms sound suppressors with a combination of old world craftsmanship and cutting edge design, technologies and materials. Liberty is a growing, family owned company who’s customers and employees are their primary concern. Liberty Suppressors, when you own one, you are family.


[UPDATE] A previous version of this article used the word “rats” in the title. The intention was never to call Brent a “rat” — he’s a cool guy — that’s just the common phrase.

32 Responses to Fleeing from a Sinking Ship: AAC Exodus Begins

  1. So is this going to be a discontinuation of the AAC product line or just moving production to a different facility?

    • If you read the posting… sounds like production is moving to their new facility in AL. It says most of the employees are fired but I think that’s tainted info with bias. There is a lot of hate for Remington. When companies consolidate, it is normal for some positions to be terminated or relocated. It is more likely that some employees and their positions are deemed redundant and eliminated (laid-off), some (the troubled ones) fired, while the rest are asked to relocate if they’d like to keep their jobs.

      It doesn’t look like the brand and products are being discontinued, which is what you’re asking.

  2. Title makes it sound like it was the fault of the original AAC employees. “Rats from a sinking ship” should be the title when the CEO or other similar titled jerk offs from the executive ranks start exiting Remington/Freedom Group with their golden parachutes and a trail of destruction and failure in their wake.

    • I think you missed the reference, its an old maritime saying, similar to “Canary in the coal mine”. Rats from a sinking ship is just another way of saying, the first signs of impending disaster.

      • Yeah, I believe “canary in the coal mine” refers to the first signs. “Rats from a sinking ship” means things have progressed further, so that the rats know to ditch, but not necessarily the humans, yet.

        In other words, the “rats” think is supposed to be picked up on by the people aboard, but it may not be recognized.

        • I understand and are aware of the reference. It’s just that the word “rat” has connotations probably more fitting of the execs. Maybe “canary in the coal mine” would have been a better title.

        • I don’t think rats have ever sunk a ship. I doubt the word ‘rats’ in this colloquialism has any relation to treacherous people being called ‘rats.’

    • I don’t think you read it correctly and added a bit that isn’t said or meant. If you do not have a death wish and are on a sinking ship, would you not flee the ship before you go down with it? It’s self-preservation.

      What the title does suggest, if you read the rest of the posting, is that Remington is the big bad sinking ship that has tainted a brand its taken over (AAC) and is dragging it down with it. So, the employees are leaving in droves in order to preserve themselves.

      I’m no fan of Remington or the all-too-common American corporate practice of: slash and burn jobs in order to benefit the few in the board room. But, the tone of the article is pretty clear that the author is not an impartial observer reporting the news.

  3. Robert Silvers said he is staying with Remington and relocating and that the 300 blackout line of products will not be affected.

    http://www.300blktalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=128&t=89362

    “AAC is moving from GA to AL by 2015.

    There are a few new 300 BLK loads coming out this year.

    No, there is no effect on 300 BLK.”

    AAC is moving to a much larger facility.

    http://www.300blktalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=128&t=89332&start=10

    “AAC is not closing as a brand, but manufacturing is moving to a much larger facility.

    This is Remington’s statement:

    http://www.gunsandammo.com/2014/05/15/g … g-alabama/ ”

    “Earlier today we announced the consolidation of multiple company plants into our Huntsville, Alabama, facility,” said Remington Spokesman Teddy Novin. “This was a strategic business decision to concentrate our resources into fewer locations and improve manufacturing efficiency and quality. We are working hard to retain as many people from the affected facilities as possible.”

    AAC product quality will not be affected like Henry rifles.

    http://www.300blktalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=128&t=89332&start=20

    “I am staying with Remington, and I don’t have any concerns with the future quality because these are not lever action rifles that were once made on manual machines and were being transitioned to CNC machines. AAC parts were always made to AAC drawings on CNC machines. They are assembled and painted in GA, and by 2015, they will be assembled and painted in AL.”

    The benefit of being a member of a forum that is owned and ran by Robert Silvers is enjoying questions and comments being answered from a no nonsense reliable source.

    RS is a mover and a shaker and influencial with 300 blackout. With a lager facility at their disposal AAC products will be produced at a greater rate than now.
    John and Robert both had been involved inssembly of pdw uppers at AAC in several years ago.

    Like it or not. Sometimes a company has to relocate in order to expand. Couple that with the benefit of consolidating into a large facility it is a win/win for Remington.
    It also provides opportunity for people to work for other companies and bring the great parts and experience from AAC to those entities. The firearms industry benefits as a whole if they can recruit those indviduals.

    That is capitalism and the economy at work in the practical world.

    • Sucks to be North Carolina right now. Everything Freedom Group owned in NC is being relocated to Alabama. It’s almost funny since the leaders of NC *could* have tried to get some of the companies making an exodus from the north-eastern states in 2013 but decided freedom group was enough.

  4. Yay!

    One more company that added flavor to the market snapped up by the Corporate Monster who puts profits ahead of producing quality items. If you ever wanted to get something from AAC, better find something already sitting on the shelf because Remington is going to cut corners on anything resembling a former AAC brand product.

      • Under Remington management, but using the same machines, designs, processes and even employees from the era of Kevin.

        Like Marlin before them, AAC is now being completely up-rooted and moved to a brand new place. It took Marlin years to make an acceptable rifle again after that move. I hope AAC doesn’t have the same issues, but the record is pretty clear…

        • Marlin was originally made on analog machines by people who knew how to run those old machines. AAC products were always made on CNC machines at machine shops.

  5. I’m sure AAC will be just fine. They have quite a few mil contracts, but their civilian market is huge. I have a few AAC cans, and they were post Remington purchase. Quality is outstanding, and I’ll be purchasing a few more in the near future.

    I’m betting Sig will be Nick’s new AAC now………………

  6. I still blame Kevin for all this. Sure hope Dave Saylors doesn’t make the same mistake as Liberty grows.

  7. The truth is nothing is wrong with the Remington Business but everything is wrong with the Libs in New York. If you check into the gun builders they are all moving out of the areas where gun rights are being taken away! I say good on them, but I do hate the fact that families are being effected by this and people’s income are being taken away. But you can thank many of your politicians for that and not blame the companies for moving where they are welcomed. I live in Huntsville Alabama and look forward to them coming to our area,and I surly welcome the workers that are willing to move.

  8. When I read the title and article I took it as Remington was starting to get their shit together by first getting rid of the vermin from ACC. These fired rats or vermin now have found other companies to nest in. I had to reread the article and comments to figure out what you really meant. You obvious do not know what “rats leaving a sinking ship means” much like Justin Bieber throwing “nigger” around.

  9. Thanks for the note that the word rat was taken out of the title, but the common phrase STILL doesn’t apply here. No one is “fleeing”, as that implies voluntarily. This is a case of being forcibly ejected. A better analogy would have been; “Victims flee the burning building that is AAC”, or similar.
    Or, if a negative slant was wanted, perhaps; “Remington exterminates former AAC employees”.

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