Gear Review: MDT LSS Chassis

P1090568r

Despite the general degradation of quality from the companies under Freedom Group’s control, the Remington 700 is still a damn fine rifle for shooters who want to spread their wings for the first time and jump into the deep end of the rifle range. It’s solidly built and accurate enough, but there are some serious differences between the average Remington 700 and a high quality bolt action rifle. The folks at MDT wanted to design a chassis that would allow those with an existing Remington 700 to squeeze every drop of accuracy out of their rifle without breaking the bank, and what they came up with was the MDT LSS (“Light Sniper System”) chassis . . .

With an existing rifle, the only thing that an average person can do to improve the accuracy is to swap out the chassis. The garden variety Remington 700 stock doesn’t free float the barrel, and the plastic mounting area doesn’t provide enough rigidity to keep the gun from shifting around under recoil. Previously, if you wanted to solve those issues you needed to either modify your existing stock using bedding blocks and mucking around with fiberglass, or buy a brand new stock for a significant chunk of change. But the LSS fixes all of those issues easily for under $400.

Last year I reviewed the first offering from MDT: their TAC21 chassis. The swap from a rubber stock to a rigid metal chassis turned my mediocre 700-AAC-SD into a lean mean one-hole-punchin’ machine, and I was over the moon. There were, however, some issues — namely the complexity of assembling the firearm in the stock, the weight of the thing, and the reported propensity of the action to wobble in the chassis (the scope was bolted to the chassis, not the action). It also cost a pretty penny, coming in around $700. MDT wanted to come up with something that fixed those issues in a way that was truly novel, and their LSS hits the nail on the head.

P1090606

The very first thing you notice about the LSS is that it’s a standard drop-in replacement stock. With the TAC21 you needed to remove the trigger assembly to get the rifle in the chassis, but with the LSS, all that’s required is to bolt it in place using the action screws. No drifting pins out, no losing springs from the trigger, and no more than 30 seconds spent making it all happen.

The second major improvement is that there’s no longer a need to mount the scope to the chassis. The action is available for direct mounting, greatly reducing the ability for things to get off-kilter and wobble about under recoil. It does mean you’ll need to purchase mounting accessories to put some glass on your gun, but it’s one less thing to worry about when you are trying to put holes in something 700 yards away.

P1090578

In terms of features, the LSS has the field beat. The chassis accepts Accuracy International magazines, the gold standard in reliability for bolt action guns and widely available (although not exactly cheap). The detachable mags extend the ammunition capacity of the gun and also make it easy to quickly replenish the firearm when 10 rounds just isn’t enough. There’s also a sling swivel stud to attach a bipod. Or I guess you could use it for a sling. But who does that anyway?

While the gun doesn’t have the full length top rail which makes the TAC21 attractive, there’s still hope for low light shooters. The chassis comes drilled for a bridge section which goes over the barrel and provides a small section of rail for night vision optics and other accessories.

P1090501

At the rear, MDT has implemented the same features that made their TAC-21 such a hit. Instead of having a proprietary stock design, they put an AR-15 receiver extension adapter into the stock and let the shooter choose their favorite stock. I’ve kitted this version out with a mil-spec buffer tube and Magpul MOE stock, but you can use whatever stock you want so long as it fits the AR-15 platform. They’ve also designed the chassis to take a standard AR-15 grip as well.

There’s one complaint I have about this system: there’s no cutout for the locking plate. M4 style AR-15 rifles have a locking plate on the rear of the rifle to keep the buffer tube from spinning around. The LSS doesn’t have a hole available to make that happen, so the rifle relies on the friction of the castle nut to keep collapsible stocks in place. There’s an adapter plate available from MDT for A1/A2 style stocks and the locking plate, but that doesn’t come with the standard stock.

Honestly though, I don’t mind.

P1090487

Out on the range, things get really awesome. The LSS chassis makes the Remington 700 feel like it’s supposed to feel, and shoot as accurately as the barrel will allow. I saw the same improvement in accuracy that I saw from the TAC21 chassis, and the more svelte profile combined with the weight savings makes the gun much easier to tote around.

I’m completely satisfied with the MDT LSS chassis. For just a hair under $400 they have produced an exceptional chassis which improves the accuracy of the Remington 700 and provides many new options for shooters to kit out their firearm. Not only that, it looks amazing. The only thing that would make it better is if it accepted AR-10 magazines, but as-is I’m happy as a clam.

Specifications:

MDT LSS Rifle Chassis for Remington 700 Rifles
Price: $399 (short action) / $449 (long action)
Also Available: Savage SA, Tikka T3, Mossberg MVP, Model 7
Weight: 1.6 lbs.
Manufacturer’s Website

Ratings (out of five):

Feel & Function * * * * *
The use of AR-15 parts allows the end user to configure their rifle to their own preferences.

Ease of Use * * * * *
Drop straight in, strap on a stock, and you are good to go. Five minute job, tops.

Overall * * * * *
I think I might have to drop the rating on the TAC21 chassis based on how well they executed this new LSS. And there’s no way that they are getting it back from me.

comments

  1. avatar Lars says:

    Quit trying to make your bolt rifle look like an ar! Get a McMillan stock and badger bottom and call it a rifle.

    1. The looks are personal preference. And there is more to the chassis than just looks!

      1. avatar Tex300BLK says:

        Yeah unfortunately a floppy telescoping carbine stock isn’t really a preference among anyone who wants to be taken seriously shooting beyond 100 yds.

        You could spend less money and get a real stock… McMillan’s are cool for sure, but 375-400 gets you into pretyt much any of the aluminum bedded composite stocks from HS Precision or B&C

        1. avatar Rusty Shackleford says:

          You don’t HAVE to use a floppy collapsible stock since there are a few options for rock solid collapsible stocks like Larue RAT, B5 SOPMOD, MST Minimalist, Magpul CTR and UBR, etc. Plus, it allows you to use a PRS stock or the like for more of a DMR.

        2. avatar Brandon Koehler says:

          Nobody who is in the know so to say would ever choose a hs or b&c over a properly bedded McMillan or manners. That’s an apples to oranges comparison.

    2. avatar RT says:

      Agree with Lars on this one

      1. avatar lolinski says:

        Much cheaper than buying an operator McMillian stock, so if it works I am for it.

        Though I just stick to the Sauer 200, or the 3000 SSG version.

        1. Sure, if you have a preference for stocks, go for it. This is not about whether a stock is better to use than a chassis. If you prefer an aluminum chassis system, this is a great choice.

  2. avatar paulWTAMU says:

    how does the weight compare to the standard stock the r 700s come with, do you know?

    1. avatar Nick Leghorn says:

      It is heavier than the stock stock, but its lighter than most metal chassis systems.

    2. avatar Mike says:

      As I am reading some trigger pullers are loosing track, LSS (light sniper stock) she is light but you can go as far as you want but if I am carrying my long range weapon it’s like just carrying a extra barrel.
      Oh the LSS does increase your MOA know we are talking upradeing a $700 weapon not purchasing a $1,500 to $2000 and downgrade.
      As far as the AR feel that’s what those boys want, they like the similarity between weapons (controls, grips, stocks etc)

  3. avatar dave says:

    So for the super duper low price roughly $500 I can take my straight shooting, never failed, good looking deer rifle, aka a 700 in 7mm mag that I paid ~$500 (rifle, rings, glass, and a leather sling (that I do use!) And a set of RCBS dies) for 15 years ago and make it look like that?

    No thanks.

    1. avatar S_J says:

      Not to go too off topic but I feel the same way about the Archangel aftermarket stock for Mosin-Nagants. Definitely functional, but overpriced and tacticool at its ugliest.

      The Boyd walnut stocks look pretty nice, but I can’t justify spending nearly the same price as a new M-N when I can fix most of the quirks on my existing M-N for a fraction of that with a little elbow grease.

    2. avatar Barstow Cowboy says:

      WHat he said,

    3. avatar Rusty Shackleford says:

      This seems like it was custom designed for the Mossberg MVP .308 rifle.

  4. avatar Defens says:

    I always figured a “chassis” should at least have the shock absorbers and other suspension components. Oh wait, that’s automobiles, where “chassis” is an appropriate term.

    When did gun stocks become “chassis”? Or is that the new “tactical”?

    1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

      The chassis is CNC milled from billet tactical aluminum.

      1. avatar lolinski says:

        Gotta use tactical aluminum or else it won’t hold up. Right?

        1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

          Absolutely.

  5. avatar Joe R. says:

    Thank you MDT for still innovating. It’s a comfort to know people are still out there doing that.

  6. avatar Tom says:

    “under $400” Not quite. You have to add the cost of the stock, pistol grip and magazines.

  7. avatar VF77 says:

    Holy smokes I think I am in hog heaven. I was eye-ing up the TAC 21 like Tiger Woods in a brothel with a fistful of hundreds (only I don’t have the fistful of hundreds!). This update seems to address every complaint/concern I had with the TAC21. I can’t order one soon enough. I have the 700 already (sitting in a crappy SPS rubber Hogue stock), I might as well make some use of it. This gets me exactly what I was looking for: a true free float, AR furniture, AI Mags (woo!), same barrel scope mount – and all in a lightweight package that I can swap out quickly without messing with the trigger or trying to torque it on so it won’t come loose, etc. Thank you Thank you Thank you! SOLD.

  8. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

    One issue I have here: The reliability (or lack thereof) of a magazine in any given gun has mostly to do with the manner in which the rounds are presented at the top of the magazine to the feed path into the chamber.

    The quality of the magazine plays a secondary issue, but if a high-quality box magazine presents the rounds improperly for the feed path, the rifle won’t feed properly.

    1. The magazine, whether using one from Accuracy International or Accurate Mag (or MDT’s magazines that are being released) does not have any feeding issues whatsoever in this chassis.

    2. avatar VF77 says:

      Is that a concern, DG? or an actual issue that you are aware of… (thanks)

      1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

        Apparently not with this system, per the above comment from MDT.

        My comment is a general one, is directed at the idea that one can solve or prevent feeding issues by simply buying more expensive magazines. When you’ve seen enough guns brought to you for feeding issues (regardless of whether they’re fed from box magazines, tube magazines, blind magazines, etc), the issue arises that it doesn’t matter which type of magazine you’re using, how much it cost or whether it was brand new: If the angle of presentation or the feed constrictions are wrong, then you get mis-feeding, and in some guns, this can end up taking a fair bit of time to rectify.

        This comes about because of a whole host of reasons, anything from:

        a) you dropped your mags, feed lips down, and dented them, to

        b) you decided to try using mags created for a parent cartridge for your new necked-down, blow-out wildcat round, and the rails into which the mag contacts need to be reworked for the new case dimensions

        and everything in-between. Remington 700’s fed with DBM’s have been known to have issues – whether with Remington mags, M14/M1A mags (which are of excellent quality and work just fine in a M1A) and with feed lips, followers, springs etc all being issues at one point or another.

        In rifles, the Rem700 style breech is less tolerant of feed angle issues than a coned breech (eg, a Win70). This is another reason for my preference for the pre-64 M70 as a bolt rifle.

        1. avatar VF77 says:

          All good info. Respect your opinion and appreciate your response, DG. Man, I’d love a pre-64 M70 too. You’d think Hathcock and those guys had to know what they were doing… Anyway, hopefully it will work well with AI Mags. I’ll report back if otherwise (going to be a while though). Just trying to finally make this Remmie right…. But not really expecting it to magically turn into a DT SRS or a Chey-Tac or anything… (and certainly not a sniper. This is for recreation/sport only so no real fear of anything shooting back at me if I get a bad feed)

  9. avatar RT says:

    So the accuracy improved with a wobbly ass carbine tele-stock? Come on, the least you could have done was put a PRS on it…………..

    1. avatar Tex300BLK says:

      cant use rifle stocks on these… no room for anti-rotation pin. Well some people take a hacksaw to the brand new $240 PRS but then it is useless if you ever want to put it on an AR ever again.

      1. Yes you can use a fixed stock, but you will need to use the MDT Fixed Stock Adapter.

  10. avatar GovernmentIsADisease says:

    It’s a nice stock, yes. But, I will never buy another Remington, so until they make one for Savage rifles I’ll pass

    1. The LSS is also available for Savage

    2. avatar VF77 says:

      Me either. But I have to make the one I that I already have a bit more capable. And this does it. Exactly what I was looking for. I think I am their target buyer on this. (Now all I have to do is get my darn 700 back from Big Green!).

      1. avatar Tex300BLK says:

        I strongly suggest you do more research before you buy this. $399 gets you the metal block you bolt the action to. Still have to buy a pistol grip, buffer tube and castle nut, and an AR carbine stock.

        Do you honestly want to drop close to $600 on a stock that at the end of the day still uses a wobbly (yes even the friction locked AR stocks wobble) carbine stock? The cheek weld has to be abismal with this thing. You can get an aluminum and composite HS precision stock for $375-400 or a much nicer chassis for ~$100-150 more than this chassis once you add all the required hardware.

        Seriously Nick, very disappointed you gave this a 5 star without even mentioning all the extra crap then end user has to buy, or more imprtantly how much that stuff costs, to get it running. That is borderline deliberately misleading.

        1. avatar VF77 says:

          I appreciate your advice, Tex. Being new to the ‘precision’ world, I have a lot to learn – just as I did with AK, AR, etc. But learned the expensive way with those unfortunately. I do get my Magpul ACS stocks to lock up pretty nice, but again, on an AR… not precision. Will definitely research more, but still really like this option (I already have the stock, grip, etc). This thing blows away the TAC21 for my purpose too..

  11. avatar Rob says:

    How does this compare to an Accuracy International stock?

    The AI 1.5 stock is about $750. The PRS stock is $250 and the adapter you need from MDT for the fixed stock is $50. So 400+250+50=$700 add to that your grip of choice and a buffer tube and you are basically to the price of an AI 1.5 stock if not more.

    1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

      You could, if you wish to use a Rem700 action or style action, go with the Tube Gun style stock for another option.

      The Eliseo tube stocks are very well proven in the accuracy game.

  12. avatar Ben Dynan says:

    You say it is more accurate, but where is the proof? Lets see some targets.

  13. avatar Lolinski says:

    How much is a Remington 700? Here in Norway they cost 11000 NOK while the Sauer SSG 3000 costs 12000 NOK. Don’t have to tell you that this is useless to me.

    1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

      I think I’d rather have a Sauer STR in 6.5×55 than any 700. But that’s me.

      1. avatar lolinski says:

        Yup, that is what I was saying.

        It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

        Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

      2. avatar lolinski says:

        Yup, that is what I was saying.

        It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

        Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

      3. avatar lolinski says:

        Yup, that is what I was saying.

        It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

        Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

      4. avatar lolinski says:

        Yup, that is what I was saying.

        It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

        Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

      5. avatar lolinski says:

        Yup, that is what I was saying.

        It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

        Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

        Note: comments are not working properly.

    2. avatar lolinski says:

      Yup, that is what I was saying.

      It is one thousand NOK more (167 dollars) and I make 250 nok an hour mowing lawns for some nice old people. Will rather work those four hours extra and get the Sauer. Also you can change out the barrel and mag to convert it to/from .308, 5.56, 6.5 and .22 LR. At least you can do that on the STR version (Wooden target style stock).

      Maybe I am biased since I shoot competitions with it? I know I can shoot 5 rounds touching each other (almost through one another) using only a sling and diopter sights, and I am definately the weak link. Haven’t shoot as much as I would like tough. Only thing that would make it better for me would be if it could use G3 or M1A mags. I heard about a firm in Canada which does that kinda thing, can’t recall the name.

  14. avatar John says:

    Looks like a great drop in utilitarian stock with excellent ability to build up with just enough features rather then pricing it out of the market MDT was shooting for. Good review.

    1. avatar VF77 says:

      excellent summary. that’s exactly what it is for me

  15. avatar Accur81 says:

    Damnit, Nick! Here I am at work, not doing work, and I gotta read this on TTAG. Oi.

    How are you liking the Bushnell ERS 3.5-21 scope? And what kind of groups are you shooting with Gold Metal Match type ammo?

  16. avatar PeterK says:

    “I think I might have to drop the rating on the TAC21 chassis based on how well they executed this new LSS. And there’s no way that they are getting it back from me.”

    That made me laugh. 🙂

  17. avatar Tex300BLK says:

    Just for the sake of being devils advocate, you can buy an HS precision tactical/ varmint/ sendero stock for less than this and have a real rifle buttstock with a comb and bottom edge to ride bags on instead of an AR style collapsible stock/buffer tube, and with this,if I understand correctly, you still have to buy a CTR or similar carbine stock correct? Does it at least come with a buffer tube installed or is that another purchase required? I cant help but notice there is nowhere for for the anti rotation pin so a nicer rifle stock like a PRS is out of the question unless you are the type that doesn’t cringe when taking a hacksaw to a $250 dollar part. I mean it looks cool I guess… yeah not really. There are better chassis systems available for similar price when you include the butt-stock and miscellaneous items that are required for this.

    Probably the first time I would say I dont agree with your review Nick, not even a little bit.

    EDIT, I just went to their website to confirm I wasnt crazy and Im not, a chassis for my savage costs $399, have to add a pistol grip ~$20, buffer ~20-50 depnding on where you buy, and a stock ~$70-100 That just became a $600 proposition real quick. I can go HS precision for $375 or XLR evolution Chassis for $750 but a a way better investment from first hand experience

    1. avatar VF77 says:

      Some valid points. Is the price point your only issue, or actual quality? I already have a stock, buffer tube, grip, etc… so that added cost isn’t an issue for me personally. XLR evolution looks nice too, but more $$ out of the gate. Do like the folding stock option though.

      1. avatar Tex300BLK says:

        It partially the price point, thats true, I should have prefaced I didnt have all those parts sitting around so I was including them in my calculations… although I will still point out you can get an HS Precision tactical stock for even a hair cheaper than this chassis and you dont have to use an AR Carbine stock. Again, the cheek weld with this thing has to be utter crap, and I will struggle to take anyone seriously tries to argue that a carbine stock is a viable long range stock. Having shot a fair number of precision rifles I dont think I couldnt ever get over that detail if I’m being honest. The design (and I will note all chassis systems that use an AR style buffer tube have this issue) precludes you from using the nicer AR Rifle stocks like a PRS or UBR or even just a humble A2. So for me, its DOA. Others may disagree.

        1. avatar VF77 says:

          Thanks for the response, Tex. You do make a great point about the stock. My area is really more AK, AR, etc… so don’t have a ton of time in the precision rifle arena yet. I know I learned a lot AFTER I bought my first AK, AR, etc… and wished I had learned before… So am just soaking it all up right now. But, this build isn’t really intended to be a high end precision rifle per say. I would have went with something other than the 700 honestly. I just need to build out the one I have – which SUCKS right now in it’s hogue rubber stock, fixed mag, etc.

        2. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

          Then there’s the lack of a sling attachment points and handstop up front, the issue of how do you cant the buttplate in the rear, no bag rider, etc.

        3. You can also use a fixed stock for the LSS chassis, using the MDT fixed stock adapter. And knowing that there are limits using the AR-15 buttstocks, MDT is also releasing a Skeleton Rifle Stock for this reason.

        4. avatar Tex300BLK says:

          @Maarten… just saw that adaptor. The video on the adaptor page showing the rifle with a PRS makes me happy. That skeleton stock also looks way better than most of the stocks available for chassis out there now.

          Two things though, first, with the adaptor and PRS/ Skeleton stock we are now well in the $700 price range. Which is actually not bad because most other chassis like my personal favorite the XLR Evolution start at that price, and even more for something like an AICS, but its annoying given how Nick raves about it being a $399 chassis, which is just not true even if you use carbine hardware. Also for that coin you could buy a McMillan A series and have it fully bedded to your action by a gunsmith, so you have to weigh your options.
          Second, that adaptor means a huge increase in length of pull, not a big problem for me (6’2″) but something to be considered.

          So to summarize, looks like a good chassis, equal in price to the other chassis systems if you want something that is comparable and far more expensive than some of the other very high quality traditional rifle stocks like HS Precision.

          Again not my cup of tea.

        5. Agreed in the LOP. That is why the MDT Skeleton Rifle Stock was made 2″ shorter. (Butt pad can still be extended). That fixed stock adapter is getting a change to get it shortened up.

          And on the price range, yes that is certainly correct, it will cost a total of $500 – $700 depending on which accessories you use, which definitely is not everyone’s cup of tea. But at the other hand many people love the fact that they can customize how they want.

  18. avatar Joe says:

    Most serious shooters have at least one extra pistol grip, and AR-15 stock floating around, so your only out a buffer tube and castle nut. With a CTR theres is almost zero wobble, also I’d like to see how little that small amount of play makes whilst shooting at ranges out to 1,000 Meters. I’d wager that the play present in every bipod I’ve ever shot off of or handled will effect you more but thats just a guess. This chassis just gives me an exscuse to go get a Savage SA.

  19. avatar TJ says:

    Things for the review. Since I wouldn’t give HS Precision a penny upon pain of death, it’s not even in the cards for me, and consider any shooter endorsing their product to be a traitor to liberty–at best. Because of that, I need options. This, with a fixed stock, may be just that option.

    1. avatar Tex300BLK says:

      Care to elaborate on that statement? Just personal preference? Bad experience?

      Also this chassis outfitted with a nice rifle stock and all the other accessories you need to get it shoting costs as much as a professionally bedded McMillan or Manners composite… so take that how you want. It looks like a good option as far as Chassis go, but properly outfitted is only barely cheaper than an XLR Evolution and is actually more expensive when outfitted than the XLR Element. (basically the exact same chassis).

  20. avatar Mike says:

    I will be trying one for my AAC 300BLK Model 7. There are very few options for the model 7, this gives me free float AND detachable mags? Pure win. Plus a $200 stock…will this madness please end soon???

  21. avatar Lucas M says:

    I was thinking about getting the tac21 but what do you mean by “reported propensity of the action to wobble in the chassis” is the caused by loose screws that just need some loctite? Would I be better off with the LSS I like the design of the tac21 better but would choose the LSS if it preforms better. thanks

    1. avatar Maarten says:

      The screws do not come loose. The TAC21 and LSS mount the exact same way. Some people do prefer loktite. It does not hurt to use this. The TAC21 does perform better than the LSS. Mostly due to the straightline design.

  22. avatar D says:

    What scope, scope rings and mount are used here??

  23. avatar Lo Kruth says:

    One thing i cant really find any information on regarding the LSS chassi for the mossberg mvp 308w is,does it release the magazine just like an ar15 with a easy to reach button on the right side or is it an ak style paddle?

    Looks like a really great chassi for the mvp anyhow

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

button to share on facebook
button to tweet
button to share via email