Evolve’s M.O. is promoting safe, responsible gun ownership while employing a more arch sensibility than, say, the NSSF’s Project Childsafe or the NRA’s Eddie Eagle programs. Not that there’s anything wrong with those more staid, traditional approaches. As Evolve’s Rebecca Bond says, there’s room in the safety advocacy universe for all kinds of strategies. Each one has the potential to reach a different constituency. You may remember their inaugural Don’t Be a Dumbass effort that garnered attention and some comment. This time out, Evolve’s coming at the topic of safe gun storage in a way that might appeal to people like Amanda Marcotte. Press release after the jump . . .

NEW YORK, NY – June 26, 2014 – Whose responsibility is it to keep inappropriate objects out of children’s hands? It’s the adult’s responsibility, says a new PSA campaign from maverick non-profit Evolve.

In the spot, two young mothers are discussing their sons’ play date when it goes seriously wrong and leaves them horrified. The scenario is a set-up for the tag line, “If they find it, they’ll play with it… so always lock up your guns.” The spot is being released to TV stations, broadcast and cable networks and online.

See the PSA here (Note: Don’t click if easily offended)

“Adults keep all kinds of things around the house they wouldn’t want kids playing with. We’re saying responsible adults store these things so kids can’t get their hands on them,” says Jon Bond, Co-founder of Evolve.

The tongue-in-cheek spot, titled ‘Playthings,’ is the latest message from Evolve, a non-profit dedicated to encouraging the responsible storage of firearms, and using humor to get the message across.

According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 1.4 million homes have firearms stored in a way that makes them accessible to the wrong hands – children, at-risk youth, potential thieves, and those who intend to harm themselves or others.

“Our PSA is humorous, but the message is serious. Parents need to take ownership of safety in the house. If you don’t want kids to play with it, put it away – it’s up to you to keep your stuff locked up. We’re using humor to cut through political correctness and deliver a simple message. Americans can have a serious conversation about firearm safety that doesn’t devolve into a political abyss,” says Rebecca Bond, Co-founder of Evolve.

The spot was created pro-bono by McCann Erickson New York. “The idea is designed to make people laugh, and then think. Thoughtful conversations about gun safety are too rare, and we’re hoping a little humor will break through that impasse,” said Sean Bryan, Chief Creative Officer at McCann Erickson New York.

Rebecca Bond, Evolve co-founder, has worked for large Fortune 500 companies, international consultancy, agencies and start-ups with an expertise in marketing, branding, business development and strategy. She has an extensive background in sports and entertainment marketing, working for Miller Brewing, NASCAR brands and Cablevision Systems, among others.

Jon Bond, Evolve co-founder, co-founded Kirshenbaum Bond + Partners, a New York City advertising agency that pioneered guerilla marketing techniques including sidewalk advertising, popup stores, and other forms of what would eventually come to be known as viral marketing. The firm became the largest independently held agency in the United States, with clients including BMW, Target, Citi, Capital One, Tommy Hilfiger, Victoria’s Secret, Verizon, AT&T, Snapple, and Delta Airlines, among others.

Evolve is a group of gun owners and non-gun owners who are only interested in one thing: firearms safety and reduction of violence through personal behaviors and education. We believe safety messaging should be cool and aspirational, and led by owners and industry. We are not taking on laws, we are taking on behavior. ‘Playthings’ is the second safety and responsibility message from Evolve.

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115 Responses to Evolve: If They Find It, They’ll Play With It [Possibly NSFW]

    • I don’t know. I think it would be more effective if there were some 425lb shrieking harpy with thick rimmed glasses and purple & green hair telling us all we’re baby murdering shitlords for even considering owning a gun.

    • Yeah, “a coalition of gun owners and concerned citizens”…blah blah blah- Ms Bond is just another self-promoting PR legend-in-her-own-mind, trying too hard to catch up to Ms. Watts, formerly of Monsanto, now Bloombergs right hand mommy for hire.

      I wonder if the marketing manager for that little Minnesota gun-maker still has a job. Forget the name- makes a .357 1911. Pretty sad- watching the videos I saw an obviously out-of-touch old founder, who belated found out he was being taken for a ride by the Evolve concern troll/gun-grabbers.

  1. “According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 1.4 million homes have firearms stored in a way that makes them accessible to the wrong hands – children, at-risk youth, potential thieves, and those who intend to harm themselves or others.”

    Why is the CDC looking at guns in the home? Is gun ownership a disease? Maybe that’s the stigma that anti gun politicians and bureaucrats want to attach to gun ownership. Just another example of faceless bureaucrats being used to strip citizens of their rights.

    • A classic example of government overreach. Have the CDC ordered any guns yet? I’m sure they will need to be tooled up when the next Typhoid Mary comes along.

      • What was the movie? “Quarantine” the original and sequel? I’m positive the CDC have guns already?

    • Because the current leftist administration views gun ownership as a “public health issue”. So, yes.

    • I hate government overreach as much as anyone here, but in all fairness the CDC does track causes of death and guns do take lives every year.

      I do question where they get that 1.4 million figure. Knowing how these statistics are extrapolated, there really is no way to know for sure how accurate that is. Also the phrase “stored in a way that makes them accessible to the wrong hands” could mean many things.

    • EVERYTHING and ANYTHING the CDC is invoved in is political BS.

      To my recollection the CDC was forbidden by statute from gun related activities/discussion/”research” Perhaps a dog ate their email or the hard drive crashed.

      • That’s mostly correct. While the CDC is not banned from conducting research related to firearms they are not granted any funds to do so. The CDC goes where the money goes, shows how much they are to be trusted. The funding was cut by Congress with the added instruction that the CDC cannot conduct “research” that is clearly biased toward any particular political policy (gun control). If you look into the details more closely you can find their conclusions were the complete opposite of what the researchers stated in their research in one case in order to show gun control measures would work and in other cases material information was withheld or removed and other obvious methods to misrepresent the data were used. The official language is as follows: “none of the funds made available for injury prevention and control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may be used to advocate or promote gun control.”

        As a medical exercise we fully understand HOW firearms kill people. There is no mystery in that topic. The WHY of the matter is none of the CDC’s business, that has to do with social, economic, and crime factors. Those factors were routinely manipulated and omitted in CDC research to make firearms appear as a random risk evenly distributed across the US. In fact, the actual “risk of death by firearm” is extremely low in the vast majority of the US and high in certain small, densely packed areas for certain groups of people. This was illustrated in the 2012 CDC report. In the initial release of the CDC report at the end of Q3 there was a breakdown of “gun violence” that showed that 80% of homicides were attributed to “gang-related activities”. When the final report was released in January the term “gang” did not even appear in the report and the initial report was removed. The CDC has not lost their bias, just their funding to push it.

    • Why are you turning on the CDC? Don’t pro gun groups quote a lot of their data and statistics to counter the anti’s? They’ve shown that the problems with firearms are miniscule compared to the deaths from car accidents and medical malpractice and where the problem areas in our country are. Instead of treating the CDC like another overreaching branch of government we should bring their studies to light considering some of them were tasked by the current administration and then ignored when they didn’t show the right answer.

      • In the past the CDC incorrectly (and strongly) asserted the risk of death by firearm was evenly distributed across all areas of the US across all demographics when the data showed the vast majority of incidents occur in very small urban areas within a very specific demographic, namely inner-city gangs. Their “research” called for more gun control on the basis that 30,000 people die each year randomly from guns in the same way people die from illnesses like pneumonia. Thus there must be something we can do to fight this “illness” and the answer was gun control. Once you take out gang violence, justifiable shootings (including police shooting said gang members), and suicides you’re left with a very low “random death” number. The CDC was found to deliberately misrepresent information, omit material information, and outright lie by Congress. Quite frankly the CDC started with the assertion more gun control is good and tried, and in some cases didn’t even try, to make the numbers match.

        Today we use their information because Congress required them to sanitize their message and because it’s a source the anti-gun side won’t balk at immediately. As I pointed out above the CDC is still biased but doesn’t have enough resources to push it too much. Then you have the issue of statistics, that being given any set of data you can infer pretty much anything with the right pick of logic and variables.

    • The CDC’s purview isn’t just disease. It’s public safety. They also collect car crash data and swimming pool drownings, for example.

      Improperly stored guns are considered to be a public safety issue, and with 600 or so average accidental deaths and 240k guns reported stolen each year, it sort of is.

      Since responsible gun owners properly store their weapons, generally aren’t very tolerant of those who are unsafe, and nothing in this campaign is advocating legislation…I don’t really see an issue with it.

    • That’s the next phase of HRH Barry and Bloomberg’s campaign to disarm America. Haven’t you heard? Shootings are a disease. Never mind that it’s a disease that’s decreasing and becoming even more concentrated in inner-city ERs.

      More of the Mighty Midget’s cash at work.

  2. This is my rifle
    This is my gun
    One is for killing
    The others for fun
    So until this war is over
    Or until your time is done
    This is your rifle and this one is your gun

  3. How many children are killed or injured by finding firearms and playing with them? I can’t find the number but if I remember correctly, it was fairly low.

    • The CDC studied unintentional firearms deaths for children ages 1 to 14 for the period 1999 – 2010. In 1999, there were 88 unintentional firearms deaths in the demographic population of 56.15 million (0.2. per 100,000). In 2010, there were 62 unintentional firearms deaths in the demographic population of 57.28 million (0.1 per 100,000). So, the number of deaths decreased, even while the population increased and the number of guns in households increased for those 11 years.

      As a comparison, about 2 children ages 1-14 die from drowning every day.

      Overall, this shows gun owners as far more responsible than the general public.

      • Given it is summer, here is a fun one.

        There are is a lot of agit-pop about asking if the family that your child will go over to see has a gun and how parents should ask. How many of those parents ask if the house has a pool and if everyone in the house knows CPR or can handle someone who may be drowning?

        Recently made this argument with some parents and all I got was crickets

    • The closest number you’re likely to find is the number killed in gun accidents of any kind. For 0-14 it’s about 75 annually, for 14-18 it’s probably another 75-100.

      If you want to understand the statistical relevance of gun accidents in overall accidental deaths, it’s about 750 gun deaths in an overall group of 130,000 or so deaths.

      That said, if you’re a parent your firearms should be secured. There’s a ton of fear mongering on the other side about this, but if a child in your care dies in a gun accident that’s criminal negligence in my book. There’s no way around it.

      • I agree and I keep my guns in a safe and my home defense gun locked in a biometric box, but I still think it’s important to do like it was done when I was in school, teach a child at a young age about Gun safety and impress upon them that Gun is a tool, not a toy.

    • I may be wrong, but I think the number was around 15 last year, but understand that some government agencies may list a higher number because they view anyone 26 and under to be a child.

  4. I am not even watching this. Evolve is a gun control organization built upon duplicitousness. Do not support them or fall for their tricks. They are the f*cking Sith.

  5. “1.4 million homes have improperly stored guns….” this figure was created by what sort of voodoo magic? Goes with the 40 % of guns sold without background checks, or the 30,000 plus lost every year to gun violence…..or the 70 plus gun attacks in schools. The “common sense” folk seem to have at very least no numerical or mathematic sense.

    • I agree.

      I have no problem with their PSA. Telling folks to properly secure their firearms is not a bad message. And yes, kids are curious creatures who attempt to get into many things that they shouldn’t.

      I certainly don’t favor additional laws regarding this, but the message itself is good.

      • @Dan Z, it ain’t about the message of safety, it’s about who is saying it. In this case, Leftists. It might as well by Chucky Schumer saying. Leftist/statism is as Leftist/statism does. No sense in supporting them. Period. And they aren’t saying anything different than what any other Pro-Second Amendment organization is saying. So why give ’em airtime?

        • so, what you are saying is a good message is a bad message when the source of delivery is bad. Ummmm K!

        • “Do not stop him, for no one who does a mighty work in my name will be able soon afterward to speak evil of me.”

          It doesn’t matter which side of the religious fence you stand, there is wisdom in these words to be applied to a great many aspects of life.

      • Absolutely – so when the overreaching USDA and Forest Service tell children that “Smokey’s Kids Don’t Play with Matches”, obviously the message is false, freedom-smothering, and should be disobeyed. Burning down forests is my right, so I say give every kid a box of matches and turn ’em loose.

        Just because you’re suspicious of the intent behind a message or don’t like the way it’s delivered doesn’t mean the message itself isn’t a good one. Personally, every time I hear or read that “Keep your b****r hook off the bang switch” statement, I want to kick the cretin who utters it in the nads; but that doesn’t mean the message is false.

        It’ll be interesting to see how Evolve evolves.

        • @Defens, you are using a strawman argument. Fail.

          The message may be fine, but the messenger and the agenda behind the message is all wrong and solidly based in the anti-liberty camp.

  6. This is funny, and there’s no reason not to support their efforts. There’s also no reason to not point out that “safety” is often a Trojan Horse for the gun control movement. Comparing this legitimate common sense to the punitive, vindictive and ultimately ineffective laws states like Massachusetts continues to pass could actually help fence sitters understand why we tend to oppose stuff like this.

  7. Really? Dildo sword fight for gun safety? Talk about desperate to hook someone, somewhere with this angle they are pushing.

    I don’t think gun safes are always practical. Certainly if you own several guns it makes a lot of sense and if you have children in your home, you must make sure your guns and ammunition are secure… but how is this relevant to the rest of us? A gun in the safe is a gun you are not using on short notice.

    • Dude, where do you live where you need multiple guns available on short notice? One or two I could see but more than that? Sure folks without kids can be a little looser on the storage bit but then that just makes them easier to steal if you’re not home.

      • “One or two I could see but more than that?”

        So, the conversation is now how many guns “you could see” is valid for someone to own / have readily available at short notice? What he has is subject to your approval?

        And people wonder why so many of us worry about the Statist | Nannyist | “It’s really not YOUR choice what you do in your home, it’s MINE” mindset.

  8. So far, this time nobody mentions the very serious need to teach/train children, from the earliest age possible, the truth about guns and how to behave when they find/see one.

    My sons were raised with guns in our home, several easily available. They knew from the time they could walk that they could not touch the stove, the electric outlets, the knives on the counter, the fireplace… countless other things. The guns were included in this, of course, and they never touched them without our permission and supervision until they were ready to own guns themselves.

    This mania to lock up everything serves no purpose unless children are so unruly or retarded they can’t be trained. The “one size fits all” approach is not good for anything.

    • The people at Evolve would probably be deeply offended by your use of the word “retarded.”

      There is actually a campaign to stop the use of that word because it hurts the feelings of people who are diagnosed with MR (Mental Retardation). I once had a job at a facility where if I said that word, I would be fired on the spot. Yet the people I worked with had no problem making lewd and inappropriate jokes constantly, both men and women. At times it bordered on sexual harassment. This hypocritical, “politically correct” audience is what Evolve is after.

      • Your gross misunderstanding about the deep and lasting “scars” left on people who suffer with mental disability by using that word, the fact that you so lightly mock those “hypocritical” “politically correct” people who are pushing to end the use of the word, belies a general ignorance that is just shameful. The fact that the poster above you used that word is equally shameful and born out of ignorance.

        I worked for the better part of 4 years with organizations who worked with people with disabilities (we use what is called “people first” language as opposed to labeling someone solely by the disability they have). The campaign to end the use of that word has nothing to do with being politically correct and has everything to do with treating someone with respect regardless of mental or physical capacity.

    • This, exactly. Nothing wrong with encouraging people to be careful with their firearms. And nothing wrong with the message “don’t be stupid.” In fact, don’t be stupid, or think before you act, is perhaps the best general advice any parent can give their children.

      That said, any group that leaves off the education of children aspect isn’t really serious about gun safety. This approach again emphasizes the object rather than the person interacting with the object. They may steer away from that to appear neutral, since gun grabbers oppose any measure that would normalize gun ownership. Even if ignorance costs lives.

    • Remember when we used to advocate TEACHING children things, like not to play with things that don’t belong to them, like not to steal?

      As opposed to today when adults are expected by society to run around in a constant panic locking things up and putting plastic covers on everything because their kids might get hurt?

      If one of the children in that video had been me, my Mother would have beat me twice. Once for going threw her stuff in her room. And Once for taking something that was hers. I’m sorry, I AM all for responsibly locking up your guns so that CRIMINALS don’t break in and take them. But, at some point, we have to start teaching children to be responsible for THEMSELVES. Lock up your guns, its good for the gun, and teach you kids not to touch other peoples stuff. It IS an IMPORTANT life lesson.

      • This assumes that there is a caring, responsible parent or two around consistently to teach things to their own and visiting children. NOT a “baby momma” or an overworked teacher.

    • Any person can be taught, “THIS IS NOT A TOY” unless they’re so profoundly retarded that they need an attendant.

      Control your children, not my guns!

  9. “Rebecca Bond, Evolve co-founder, has worked for large Fortune 500 companies, international consultancy, agencies and start-ups with an expertise in marketing, branding, business development and strategy. She has an extensive background in sports and entertainment marketing, working for Miller Brewing, NASCAR brands and Cablevision Systems, among others.

    Jon Bond, Evolve co-founder, co-founded Kirshenbaum Bond + Partners, a New York City advertising agency that pioneered guerilla marketing techniques”

    I read that and my first thought is “shills.”

    I don’t mean this as ad hominem, but as a legitimate question.

    Why are we allowing ourselves to be taken over by advertisers and marketing types? “Branding” and all that jazz is just….ephemeral fluff to sell products. And ideas.

    I’m not saying these folks don’t have an honest desire to improve “safety” and are simply working within their own field to accomplish that, but…given the nature of advertising, why would we listen to them?

    The entire premise of the field is manipulation, and it routinely uses lies and fallacies to accomplish that goal.

    Here’s an honest question for the anti-gun crowd. If the message is ‘right,’ why do you need all the PR shills, advertising and branding experts, phony think-tanks AND be in bed with a willing Main Stream Media to get your message “out there?”

    The truth will find a way. It does not have to be “sold” like this. As the map in this article shows:

    http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2014/06/dean-weingarten/moscow-restaurant-encourages-open-carry/#more-326231

    (Not meaning to discount the incredibly hard work of the people who got those laws changed, but their effort was just….different).

    • Just FYI, those ads and commercials you see from the NRA, Taurus, Daniel Defense and others weren’t cooked up in someone’s basement. People and corporations who want to produce and distribute media typically hire people in that industry. It’s what they do. Would you hire an auto mechanic to fix your plumbing?

      • I don’t watch those ads, either. “Advertising” is not “information;” or, it rarely is.

        How about instead of cutesy bull squeeze, trendy, edgy, catchy “hooks” to advocate gun safety, they just advocate gun safety? Has where we “evolved” into as species really become the need to use dildos to get people to exercise safe practices with potentially dangerous tools?

        “Would you hire an auto mechanic to fix your plumbing?”

        What utter nonsense. You are saying that like I NEED an “advertising expert” to do something in my life.

        These people sell image and try to convince people that image is all that matters.

        Like I said the first time: fluff. No substance; just fluff.

  10. Hilarious… I hope I’m not the only one who got a good laugh out of the “playthings” the kids found…. but then again I’m married with two kids.

    That being said, I hope people aren’t seriously coming in here to argue that you don’t need to have guns locked up when you have kids in the house. That’s just plain common sense. I don’t care if you say your kid knows the 4 rules etc etc etc… you are posting an invite for bad things to happen if you dont take that simple step. You home defense gun should be on you or in a bedside lock box… especially if you have kids. This PSA isn’t propaganda, and people getting all defensive and claiming that telling people to store their weapons safely is an “infringement” of your rights just makes you look crazy and unreasonable to any normal person.

    • Asking me to store my weapons properly is just a good suggestion. Advocating a law, which they thankfully did not do in this video, which would make me a felon if I do not spend thousands of dollars on proper gun storage? That is what irks me and many others. Alternatively, advocating a tax write off for gun safes, gun locks, and gun training? I’m all for that.

    • I’ve seen the same double standard around here from time to time:

      I carry a gun because I’m a realist. I wish bad things don’t happen, but I know they do, so I must be prepared.

      Next day….

      OMG, why do I need to lock my guns up?!?! This is dumb, I tell my kids to never touch them with out me, why should I have to have a safe or lock box or anything else?

      Then again, I don’t have kids, nor do I plan on any, so I’m not the target audience.

      • Yeah, children are imperfect, I always have my son sit with me when I clean the guns after a range trip, and I am teaching him safety rules and what to do etc etc… but Im still going to keep my guns locked in a safe, and keep the HD pistol on my hip or in a lockbox under the bed, because its prudent. Not because I dont trust him or because I am not involved.

        Its like people who argue against using seatbelts, or carseats, or people who willfully smoke. You just sound crazy when you come out and are like “Oh yeah I let my kid keep his AR15 in his closet because he knows the 4 rules. Ok good… I hope you never have an accident. You know, hope for the best, plan for the worst.

        Kids are too unique and different to just assume, oh yeah my boy knows the four rules so he will never ever ever in a million years pull the trigger without press checking and ensuring the gun is pointed in a safe direction… until he does, then what? You cant call that shot back.

        My son never put anything in his mouth that wasn’t food, stayed in a crib until he was over 3 years old without ever climbing out once, never tried to stick something in an outlet, etc etc, or if he ever tried to do one of those things all I had to say was “no” and he would stop… my daughter is barely one and has already almost escaped from her crib, proactively walks around and tries to pull the plastic caps out of the outlets, and will put anything that is within arms reach in her mouth like a vacuum cleaner. So I guess I must be one of those ultra progressive modern parents or something because I clearly am a negligent parent because I rely on common sense and practical safety devices to prevent tragic accidents… mmmhmmm

        • All good points. You can’t assume the lessons stick just because you give them. You also have to observe their behavior over the course of time to see that they can be trusted. At some point, you will probably want to give your son the access code to the handgun lock box in case bad things happen when you are not at home. There is no magic age at which the benefits suddenly outweigh the risks of making your kid an authorized user of the home defense gun. Depends on the individual kid.

    • You dare to suggest that Evolve is condescending? I’m shocked you could come to such a conclusion, they clearly have their finger on the collective pulse of the American heartland!

    • I think we can all agree that keeping guns away from children who are too young to know better is an excellent idea. When my daughters were very little, we chose not to have guns in the house at all (not saying that is the only way to go, just what we decided to do). However, by the time each of them were 12, they knew how to safely operate a gun, understood the dangers involved, and knew that (away from the range) you don’t handle a firearm unless you genuinely need to. I’ve met other kids I wouldn’t trust with the access code to a pointy stick. So, like everything else, it comes down to the individuals.

    • > …we can all agree…

      Ha ha, oh Paul, you do know how to get the giggles going.

      This is TTAG, son, this is TTAG.

  11. Evolve is just another anti-gun group put together by rich marketing and advertising industry people who think they can use their social manipulation skills get their foot in our door with a less extreme overt message. They act like they are innocently addressing a “big problem” but they are really disseminating the propaganda that the “problem” is much larger than it is, and that if not for them there isn’t any other more qualified group working on it, or that the existing groups are too “old fashioned” to be effective. Their existence is a statement that the NSSF and NRA and gun owners aren’t doing a good enough job and need to be told how to do their job by some self-appointed elite. This organization just “woke up one day” and had the audacity to claim gun safety expertise and knowledge of “gun culture”. The people in this group have no experience or history to back up that claim of expertise. None of them put any time or effort in with any of the other established and credible gun safety programs run by credible organizations.

    They are also spreading negative propaganda about gun owners. “Don’t be a Dumbass” is a demand targeting gun owners, suggesting that if only gun owners weren’t dumbasses there’d be no problem. How about “Don’t be a dumbass by fighting to keep Eddie Eagle out of schools, reducing funding for the ChildSafe program, and blithely allowing the entertainment industry teach your kids how to think about guns”?

    -D

    • Their existence is a statement that the NSSF and NRA and gun owners aren’t doing a good enough job and need to be told how to do their job by some self-appointed elite.

      Maybe they’re just trolling for a contract from the NSSF and NRA. What did their electrons cost them? A little time is all. I’m sorry, maybe I just a cynic, but I don’t see flowers, bows and unicorns behind the scenes of that PSA.

  12. I do agree with this: “Adults keep all kinds of things around the house they wouldn’t want kids playing with. We’re saying responsible adults store these things so kids can’t get their hands on them.”

    However, truly, there are what, 125 accidents involving children and guns. Maybe 700 involving adults (dumbass passively constructed negligent discharges?). There are 20x as many with bicycles and pools. Each one a tragedy, but this does not even amount to rounding error in the intentional use of guns (aka homicide).

    • Yeah unfortunately a lot of people in here and in our camp probably think there should be safe storage laws for dildos.

      • Safe storage laws for dildos? How about explaining what they are for and mentioning that they don’t always get cleaned before being put away? That ought to take care of it.

        • I think you missed my point… on both sides of the poltical/social spectrum. People want to legislate and or ban things they dont believe in but want the government to stay the hell out of things they do believe in.

          For instance my mother almost certainly thinks deviant evil things such as “marital aides” should be banned or at least stigmatized and relegated to the dark cellar of social taboo… same goes for abortion, gay marriage, boyfriend and girlfriend living together outside of marriage. But come to her and tell her my dad needs to register his handgun, or that taxes will be raised to pay for s new social program, health insurance mandated to pay for birth control for teens etc etc and you will get both barrels about how “its not the government’s job to regulate peoples’ private lives!!!!!!”

        • I get where you are coming from. But my comment wasn’t political. It was a joke.

  13. Take a look at all the superficially folksy american BS on their website, and compare that to who these folks are when they’re talking to their buddy Piers Morgan:
    http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2013/03/06/exp-pmt-evolve-rebecca-and-john-bond-guns.cnn.html

    And on their “tales of dumbassery” section is just a selection of anecdotes supporting the thesis that people are too dumb to own guns responsibly:
    http://www.takeonthecode.com/tales_of_dubmassery.html

    No mention of the torrents of anti-gun and gun control dumbassery in this debate.

    There’s nothing more dumbass then thinking these people are anything other than a false flag operation. Don’t let them dupe you with a red-white-and-blue website with eagles and snakes on it and a bit of humor. You are the joke to them and gun control is the punchline. They want to divide and conquer the pro-gun community.

    -D

    • I’m sorry. But when I hear the words “False Flag” I switch off and ignore you. Is it utterly inconceivable to you that there are two sides to an issue, AND a great deal of standpoints sandwiched in the middle?

      The notion, that anything not farthest left or right of an issue is merely a hidden agenda, undermines debate. “With us or against us” basically, and an identical attitude to MDA.

  14. The other day my three-year-old daughter was playing in my bedroom and I heard her yell “Daddy, I found a gun!” Terrified, I ran in there to see her pointing into the closet where my old paintball gun lay. I was relieved but also very proud of her. She did exactly what I’ve taught her to do if she were ever to find a gun. Of course I keep all my real firearms locked up but you can’t ignore the training aspect. What if your kid finds a gun while playing at a friend’s house? Or happens to find one at the park? Stranger things have happened. Teach your kids what to do if they find a gun. Tell them over and over until they get it.

    • Most big city kids’ first instinct if they find a gun in the park is to stash it and sell it later.

  15. Hmmm…as I was reading this I glanced up & was somewhat startled to see a PSA on TV to ALWAYS lock up your gun. It was a fairly graphic ad too. Nothing about teaching your kid or defending your home. God forbid you should actually carry your weapon. Oh well-I guess they only had 10seconds to make their ANTI point…

  16. This is hilarious, well-done and very appropriate for those with kids. My ad would encourage locking up your children, though. As the primary occupant of my dwelling, I’ll store my light sabers and guns as I see fit.

  17. Well–can’t disagree with the idea of keeping some things, such as loaded guns, away from children who don’t have any business with them. Do disagree with the command to “always lock up your guns.” My bedside P-64 would be useless “locked up” with an intruder coming thru the window. When grandbaby is over, it goes up out of her reach. When she gets bigger, she will be taught about it. Oh, and I did laugh at the PSA. That was well-acted.

  18. Preventing accidents/NDs by locking up guns from kids-ok

    Teaching kids gun safety as opposed to white knuckle fear-better.

  19. Part of me really wants to like this and say that it is a humorous way of getting the message across. But then the other part of me is fed up of the constant jibe that guns are a phallic substitute

  20. just watched. ha – so maybe there is a reason they haven’t had Shannon star in any of these humorous ads, huh?

  21. YES, and when the manufactures make them LOOK like toys, with their fancy colors it makes matters worse.

  22. May I add my 39 year old son thinks most gun owners are too stupid & redneck to have any firearm. Ex military-ex MP. Also works at DOD & carried a Glock 21 in Iraq’s green zone. No guns in his house because he has 3 little girls & besides he has COPS living next door. Presto no guns-no problem.

    • If the cops are off duty, they might not interfere, he will have to check the policy of the department(s) which they may work for in his area. It’s his choice and he should have the ability to make it without being encumbered…

  23. It was a funny video and well produced.

    However, are guns as equally unmentionable as vibrators and dildos in polite company? One of those taboo things that people should be embarrassed about owning? That is the subtle message, unintended or not, that I get from the video.

  24. Irrespective of whom it came from, all of us responsible gun owners should heed and encourage the message to secure our firearms from children. One accidental death of a child is one too many. We don’t need new laws. We just need to be f-ing responsible. And shame those that aren’t.

  25. While I agree with locking up unused guns (AKA not on your person or in yoyr nightstand) I also think children should be taught about guns.

  26. I laughed. Anyone else think of this scene about Hatchet Harry from “LOCK, STOCK, AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS”?

  27. This is the first I heard of this group and I laughed my ass off at this ad. that I just found

    oh my god I laughed at the part with the girls in the bouncy-house!

  28. I like the ad. Might offend someone who’s very conservative, but I found it hysterical and it makes the point.

  29. I’m more concerned that these leftists
    Allowed children to play with sex toys.

    I suspect in some parts of the country, this would constitute a type of sex crime to a minor…

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