"A" marks San Gabriel Chilac, Puebla Mexico ‎(courtesy Google Maps)

Mexico’s armed “self-defense” movement continues to grow in the country’s southern regions. The collusion between the drug cartels and the local, state and federal government – funneling a reported $100m per month from criminals to government employees – has led locals to take up arms in their own defense. It’s only a matter of time before the movement works its way north and south – despite official denials that the revolutionaries are thriving in the chaos. Will the groups morph into equally repressive paramilitary groups like El Salvador’s Black Shadow death squads or do they portend a return to the rule of law? Watch this space. Meanwhile, make the jump for an article on the armed self-defenders of San Gabriel Chilac, republished with permission from borderlandbeat.com . . .

Inhabitants of the town of San Gabriel Chilac, southeast of the poblano (inhabitant of Puebla) territory, announced the formation of a [armed] self-defense group to be mentored and trained by their counterparts from Michoacán and will also be funded by poblanos living abroad. Francisco Alfaro Rodríguez, spokesperson for the citizens group that make up the Common Front For Peaceful Civil Resistance (Frente Común de Resistencia Civil Pacífica (FCRCP)), said that they have been determined in creating this group in order to defend themselves from organized crime that plagues the region and that are in collusion with municipal and state security authorities . . .

(courtesy borderlandbeat.com)

Even though the spokesperson announced that a group of people will be traveling to Michoacán to receive training, the state government issued a report denying the existence of this self-defense group and announced that he’ll be sending elements in order to strengthen the security in San Gabriel Chilac.

(courtesy borderlandbeat.com)

The General Secretariat of Government, Luis Maldonado Venegas [above], stated that in Puebla “there isn’t nor will there ever be a self-defense group”, and described the announcement as merely media.

“The institutional fabric in Puebla is there and is enough for the public security forces to continue, as before, fully guaranteeing the rule of law and stabilizing the atmosphere that represents Puebla” he said.

He also said that, on instructions from Governor Rafael Moreno Valle, elements will be sent to the municipality of San Gabriel Chilac, “to warn the local population, privilege is given to institutions by consensus and dialogue, so there can be no such organizations”.

Whereas in San Gabriel Chilac, Alfaro Rodríguez told reporters that the group has been intimidated by the state police and the army, but nevertheless still continues its activities because they have the support of the population, who are tired of being victims of organized crime while the authorities do nothing to punish those responsible.

The FCRCP emerged out of protests from past local elections, held in July, in which armed individuals who were favoring the success of Rigoberto David Martínez Rosas, nominated by the PT (Labor Party in Mexico), as mayor of San Gabriel Chilac.

In addition to announcing that they’ll be monitoring the entrances and exits of the municipality, Alfaro also said that they’ll also be preventing the swearing in of Martínez Rosas as mayor on February 14.

61 Responses to Mexican Revolution Spreading

    • The Mexican border has always been a source of friction. Columbus, NM anyone? Cattle rustling, drug smuggling, people smuggling, gun running, violent gangs. Nothing new for that area.

      Why anyone would live withing 50 miles of the border and not be armed is a mystery to me. Is there anyone unarmed there?

      Time to bring our troops home from all our committments to defend war torn places like Europe and Japan and deploy them along the border.

      If you want to stop the flow of illegals. Simple. Make it a felony with a mandatory prison sentence to hire an undocumented worker. Watch how fast the jobs dry up.

      • First of all unarmed people are everywhere; second of all I think the gun running from north too south will increase.

        • What, the shipping of $200 AK-47s from northern Africa to southern Mexico? Yeah, that probably will increase.

        • Uh, what gun-running from North to South?

          Unless you’re talking about Operation Fast & Furious, and other illegal programs like it. THAT is literally the only sort of gun-running from the U.S. to Mexico that is occurring.

      • Being a Ret Vet. and having seen the Berlin Wall, Check Point(s- A,B,) Charlie, Fulda Gap, and sooo many others . I say (with some restraint) build the S. border fence (wall) 3x higher and lower w/claymores etc, 20 mi no mans land, and lethal force etc.

        Then let the Crock Pot cook down there stew. It is in it’s self literally a self inflicted still festering open wound of THEIR own creation that may never heal.

        Sorry It’s come to US of A for herself.

        • I’m with you up to the 20 mile no man’s land part. That’s going to eat up a terrible amount of private ranch property. Rather, give benefit of self-defense consideration under the law for anyone living within 20 miles of the border.

        • I’m not sure you understand the multiple agenda being run. Your own government has armed the cartels against the Mexican people, who you somehow want to blame for all this. I stand with the Mexican people. It’s time for them to throw off the oligarchy which has been their ruination for so long.

          Same thing on this side of the border. Oligarchical Rule must go.

        • “William Burke says: “I’m not sure you understand the multiple agenda being run. Your own government has armed the cartels against the Mexican people, who you somehow want to blame for all this. I stand with the Mexican people. It’s time for them to throw off the oligarchy which has been their ruination for so long.

          Same thing on this side of the border. Oligarchical Rule must go.””

          I understand Sir but – aka We got our own freeking ever evolving troubles and turmoil !

          National laundry needs to be done at one own Local Laundromat. If ya can’t take care of your (like feed et al) self how can ya help others?

        • Here’s the gouge:

          In Mexico:
          DHS components arm the cartels to mutually improve “business”
          DoD arms the Mexican military (and probably the police) to improve “security”
          CIA arms whoever they can to continue and improve “business” (and security)
          Citizens arm themselves for self defense

          In the US:
          DHS arms the police to improve “security”
          DoD arms the police to improve “security”
          “Three-letter agencies” and the police spy on the people to improve “security”
          Citizens try to arm themselves for self defense

        • Um, look guys. I understand your concerns, but as someone who has lived and worked literally within a stone’s throw of the border and crossed it hundreds of times, most people simply don’t know anything about it. People that live on the border know it is a joke, a charade, but a real institution with real effects. Don’t smile the right way or answer an asinine question when you’re tired to a cranky border patrol agent, let alone forget to declare something and you never know what is going to happen since they have a wide degree of descretion of federal laws are notoriously ambiguous.

          Look, Conservatives should be mindful that the War on Crime and a federal police force were a part and parcel of the New Deal and the federal masters we have now. If you want to militarize the border you should reflect on the fact that the border patrol is corrupt right now and is only getting worse. The number of agents has increased 3x just since 2001 and are every bit as much a threat to our fundamental liberties and our gun rights as the ATF. And you know what? It has made little difference. Because most “border security” happens not at the border, but 30-50 miles inside. In border areas families and business freely and legally traffic the border. It is the highest trafficked border in the world (both legal and illegal), and you’ll kill the economy the southerns states if you managed to invoke these fantasies of “sealing it”. It ain’t going to happen.

          But what can happen, and is, is the increase in size of a massive armed federal police force that cares not a bit about your rights. So no offense so anyone, and understand we’re on the same page here, but every increase in federal power has occurred by a sense of crisis. War on Crime in the 30s, War on Poverty in the 60s, War on Drugs in the 80s, and then the domestic side of the War on Terror in the 00s. All of these were false crises, but didn’t seem so at the time. 60 kidnappings nationwide was a crisis and justified the omnibus crime bill of the 30’s by FDR. If you listen to sensational and manipulatory media reports it is a crisis. Same as it ever was. And by the latter, realize that I’m a neocon and have no trouble with vigourous violence against foreign foes. But the domestic side of it has been a disaster with massive increases and draconian policies of the TSA, Homeland Security, and a host of armed federal forces that now menace us. So let’s just get familiar with what we’re talking about before we start advocating for a massive increases in armed federal police forces on the one hand, and then complaining about what they inevitably to on the other. Soon there will be such a total monopoly of the state on violence that the 2nd amendment won’t matter.

  1. Whereas in San Gabriel Chilac, Alfaro Rodríguez told reporters that the group has been intimidated by the state police and the army, but nevertheless still continues its activities because they have the support of the population, who are tired of being victims of organized crime while the authorities do nothing to punish those responsible.

    Corrupt government in a nutshell.

  2. If Mexico could just pass more “common sense” gun “safety” legislation that 90% of Mexicans want and fight the political influence of the MRA (Mexican Rifle Association) and the gun lobby, they could easily beat this. When they finally pass these important steps to save the children, the cartels will just either register their guns, surrender their weapons to the police or render them inoperable. After all, the cartels will not want to be in non-compliance with the new law and risk being arrested for breaking them.

    #sarcasm

    • You HAD me, dammit! Nice one. I failed to read ahead. But then, everyone around me has the flu. I don’t want to get it….

  3. Soon in a town and city near YOU “Red Dawn 1”.

    While Kim Jong-Un Productions says the filming of their new movie “Red Dawn 2” begins in the US right after “Red Dawn 1” completes it one year premiere showing (aka fire fight).

    Time to start screening ALL immigrants better. BTW “keep the powder dry”.

  4. The bullied can only stand so much before the bully gets his nose bloodied. Hopefully these people can take back their rights as well as stand up to the corruption.

  5. “The General Secretariat of Government, Luis Maldonado Venegas, stated that in Puebla ‘there isn’t nor will there ever be a self-defense group,’ and described the announcement as merely media.”

    Get ready for Cinco de Mayo II, amigos and amigettes!

  6. Let it happen, it is only way the crises in Mexico will get the visibility it deserves. The US MSM will only report it when it is in full blown crises and people will finally ask why has there been such little reporting on the issue. Obama will once again have to answer for his crappy policies.

    • How far advanced will this get before our government steps in to assist? I mean choose a side, government or mexican civilians?

      • I would really, really like to see us sit thus one out. Realistically, though, I have to say the government. There’s a lot of money that stands tobe lost if Mexico booted the cartels…

        • ” I would really, really like to see us sit thus one out. ”

          Me too slam the border shut, guard it to the tooth and nail. Let them fix their own crap hole gov alone as we need to.

        • I would like for U.S.A to sit this one out too, but remember America had French help during the revolution.

  7. “The General Secretariat of Government, Luis Maldonado Venegas, stated that in Puebla ‘there isn’t nor will there ever be a self-defense group,’ and described the announcement as merely media.”

    Every time I read this quote all I can think of is Baghdad Bob (Iraqi Minister of Information during the 2003 invasion for those unaware of him) insisting there were no American’s anywhere close to Baghdad. I think perhaps these two went to the same PR school…

  8. As long as the militias and the cartels are fighting in a limited area, this won’t affect the border states much. However, if this fighting spreads to several more Mexican states, the federal army will have to get more involved and it is not clear on which side they would fight. We have already seen that in some places the army fights the cartels more effectively and peace may begin to return. The bad option – and unfortunately the most likely – is that the army starts fighting the militias wholesale – and the larger that fighting gets – this could turn into an all out revolution.

    The immediate impact on the US would be enormous. The border would be inundated not with illegal immigrants, but by refugees fleeing the violence. It would be a huge humanitarian crisis as well as a diplomatic one. Either way, the path to freedom for the downtrodden citizens in Mexico would be painful and long. The people in Mexico have been cursed by corrupt government since their founding. My heart goes out to them, but I hope their local success results in the return of the rule of law, rather than perpetuating the rule of a corrupt few.

  9. do they portend a return to the rule of law?

    How can they “return” to someplace that they’ve never been? Mexico has had plenty of rule, but never rule of law.

    • Yeah, and it is a depressing thought. Even a wide-spread revolt against corruption would be more than likely to go the way of Venezuela. It’s like watching people strive for freedom and then watching it all devolve into the same old shit. the special problem of Mexico is that they are our neighbor; we share a very long border. No problem there would stay on their side of the border for long, no matter how tall a wall we built.

  10. “The bad option – and unfortunately the most likely – is that the army starts fighting the militias wholesale – and the larger that fighting gets – this could turn into an all out revolution.”

    They already have the support of U.S. grabbers. They will not blame the government of mexico for focusing on armed citizens since in their minds it will be that revelation that is the most disconcerting, not the roving bands of ATF armed narco-terrorists. That will enable our politicians to offer misguided support to the wrong side again, as everyone here repeatedly points out.

    • Sadly, I think you are right. The “little people” in Mexico have been getting the shaft for a very, very long time. it is a shame because the country has enormous wealth, most of which flows directly offshore. Even the people who vote can’t be faulted (unlike the people in CA) because no matter who they vote for, they still get shafted. And when it comes to US foreign policy, we have never gotten it right with Mexico.

      I have wondered what people like the MDA Moms would say faced with the kind of self-deterministic move to citizen-based militias that are actually making a serious inroad against being victimized. I am sure they are horrified and disapproving. God, but so many people in the US are spoiled rotten!

  11. There’s been an exodus from Ciudad Juarez to El Paso for several years due to the crime. Murders averaged 8/day when the Army was there, dropped to 1/day after the Army left (El Paso has less than 8 murders per year!). My personal theory with Mexico and all other countries is that if the citizens unite as a country they can do well. When it goes to tribal type allegiances, then it fails. Best example, when 9-11 occurred, we were all Americans first, despite inevitable conspiracy theories. Opposite, look at Iraq and Afghanistan. Bribery is so deep in Mexican culture I doubt there can be much improvement. Sad, huh?

  12. Here’s what we in the USA can do to help the situation: Drive into town tonight and ask around, “Hey man can you sell me some drugs?” When you find someone who says, “Sure, whatcha need bro?”, pull out your pistol and shoot them.

    • Works no complaints here.

      Lets see mexican/el salvadorian bakery,mexican/el salvadorian car repair, mexican/el salvadorian restaurant, mexican/el salvadorian meatpacking plant workers x 4. Endless or priceless was it.

      Time to end:TPS – Temporay Protected Status too!

      If my car is at a Mex repair shop it’s stolen

    • Better print that in mex spanish slang because they can’t read REAL Euro. Spanish so well so I’ve been told and seen.

      • “Better print that in mex spanish slang because they can’t read REAL Euro. Spanish so well so I’ve been told and seen.”

        Aha! So “Mexican” is a separate language! Howcome we don’t get to have our own language, and call it “American?” The Aussies have their own, and it’s almost indistinguishable from English. 😉

        • You didn’t get the memo. I’ve had a French woman refer to “American language” and “speaking American”. It’s been about a decade since I heard someone correct another with “we speak *English* in America”. It’s kind of acknowledged as it’s own dialect now.

        • Listen to somebody from Britain speak, then convince yourself we all speak English. Come to think of it, listen to Duck Dynasty for the same reason.

  13. This was my favorite line: “He also said that, on instructions from Governor Rafael Moreno Valle, elements will be sent to the municipality of San Gabriel Chilac, “to warn the local population, privilege is given to institutions by consensus and dialogue, so there can be no such organizations”.” Now if the people rise up and say that he government, the police and the army is in collusion with the drug cartels, there certainly seems to “be a consensus.” So what he is really saying is that the public can do nothing unless the government agrees to it–which of course it won’t; therefore there is no consensus, and the militia is illegal. Nice double speak.

    • I caught that also! I wonder if the fool later realized how ridiculous his statement must sound given the corruption within his own government, not to mention that his duty is to serve the very citizens he’s threatening.

  14. Good for the Mexican people, the essence of 2A. But they will be slaughtered by the government/cartel/ police. Just like they have always been. And if they rise up, they’ll be called commies, thus we’ll gladly provide our own soldiers and drones to slaughter them. Good times.

  15. Sounds like a job for the magnificent 7. Which is what i would call my trucking company if i was puting ar parts in lead ingots to take south and be assembled into rifles and bullets

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