“I would rather go to the Seahawks game compared to watching this thing sit in my gun cabinet.” – Seahawks fan Josh Blodgett referring to a lightly used Benelli shotgun he owns, Seahawks fans willing to barter guns, pot, pinball for tickets [at komonews.com]

61 Responses to Quote of the Day: Shotty Swap Edition

    • He should try taking it out of his cabinet every once in a while…

      Apparently, he does. From the story:

      “As of Monday night, Blodgett had a handful of inquiries on the shotgun – which he’s used for shooting clay pigeons and estimates cost about $500. “

      • At least he’s selling it to a private individual, and not handing it over to the Gov. That being said, when the game is over, he won;t have anything to show for that shotgun except for an empty space in his gun cabinet.

        • That being said, when the game is over, he won;t have anything to show for that shotgun except for an empty space in his gun cabinet.

          That could be said of virtually any transitory experience such as going to a ball game, the theatre, a vacation, etc.

  1. Come on guys, if his Benelli is just ‘sitting in his gun cabinet’, you know he has more guns than that.

    Hell, I’ve got two shotguns I’ve never even fired. I just bought them because the price was right.

    • True. I’ve got guns I’ve fired just once, to make sure they were functional. Now if he had said it was his only gun……

      • I don’t begrudge those of you who apparently have vast sums of money for extra firearms, but I just don’t get it. I basically have 3 of the best firearms money can buy and am intimately familiar with them. I couldn’t imagine having a firearm I wouldn’t use regularly. It seems like a waste.

        • I don’t begrudge those of you who apparently have vast sums of money for extra stamps, but I just don’t get it. I basically buy stamps to mail things. I couldn’t imagine collecting stamps just for the sake of collecting stamps. It seems like a waste.

        • I couldn’t imagine having a firearm I wouldn’t use regularly. It seems like a waste.

          I suppose it’s the difference between being a collector and a shooter (although some are both). I’ve been collecting military firearms for 30 years, now, and while I occasionally shoot, the vast majority of my guns are simply stored in a safe (and taken out occasionally to be looked at).

          Oddly, I feel the need to get ammo (no matter how obscure the calibre) & accessories (typically the correct holster & extra magazines) for virtually every one of my guns, even though I almost never shoot them…

          As for the need for vast sums: not really. I estimate that I’ve spent $2K to $3K a year (on average) over the last few decades on guns. Over the course of 30 years, that does add up.

          Mind you, when it comes to my gun collecting bug it helps that I’m single.

        • I couldn’t imagine collecting stamps just for the sake of collecting stamps. It seems like a waste.

          Hell, people collect barbed wire. I doubt many of them need it to control their herd of cattle…

        • 0351,

          Enjoy the gear you have. I’m guessing one is a quality AR. Once you get more than 10-20 guns, it becomes difficult to shoot each one regularly. I know that I haven’t shot my .460 Smith revolver in a year or two. It’s a great gun, I just don’t need it.

          As far as the Seahawks, I hope they get their arrogant a$$es spanked by the 49ers. Besides, it makes no sense to sell any guns unless your doing it for a Packer game.

        • Different strokes I guess. First, I’m not a high end collector. Second, I’m at a point in my life that I’m financialy doing okay. Why shouldn’t I buy a gun I don’t need just because I want it?

          Honestly, most of my shooting is done with a Mosin, a Mak and a .38. Once I get my hunting license I expect my shotgun usage to increase and I’ll need a new rifle that’s good for pig and deer. I have a .30-30 that would do for that need but it’s a reason, as if I needed one, to get a new rifle with glass.

    • Wow. So that’s really a thing? Buying and never firing, or at least not firing more than once? I see ads on, say, armslist, all the time that read “only has a few rounds through it” or “bought new, never fired” and I think “B.S., who would ever buy a regular gun and never really use it?” I just tend to assume such guns have major problems and the owner is trying to unload them on someone else.

      Now, I could see maybe a very high end hunting rifle or shotgun, because you may not have much opportunity to fire those, given the space required and hunting seasons. But a Glock 17, for example?

      • Wow. So that’s really a thing? Buying and never firing, or at least not firing more than once?

        For collectable guns, sure. How often are you going to plink with an 11mm French model 1873 revolver or a $2,000 Nazi-marked Walther PPK?

        Now, I could see maybe a very high end hunting rifle or shotgun, because you may not have much opportunity to fire those, given the space required and hunting seasons. But a Glock 17, for example?

        I have shot my Glock 22 enough to become proficient, but then again it is my home defense gun.

        • I specifically said “regular gun” and I referred to new guns. The collectibles you mention are neither regular nor new, so I’m not sure why you would even mention them. I wouldn’t fire a collectible firearm, even if ammunition were available, for fear of danger to myself and its value.

          I’m talking about any given off-the-shelf firearm typical of any big box retailer’s inventory. A few guys here say they’ve done it, and I’m in no position to dispute them. Still, as a general rule, I’m not believing any ad on the Internet where someone selling a regular firearm claims they bought it new, have put nearly or actually no ammo through it, but that it works fine.

          I can dream up a few scenarios where it could be true, but there’s no way for me to verify that with a stranger. Buying a buddy’s gun, it’s possible, and there’s the ongoing friendship to back it up. But a one and done stranger? Nope.

        • I specifically said “regular gun” and I referred to new guns. The collectibles you mention are neither regular nor new, so I’m not sure why you would even mention them.

          I guess to me, a Nazi-marked PPK is a “regular gun”!

          And that’s one of my few guns that I have fired…

          As for off the shelf modern guns, I do have a few that I’ve purchased but never taken to the range. A Bushmaster in 6.8 SPC and a VEPR 12, just to name a couple.

    • And avoid the traffic, filth, noise, morons in the stands, being felt up by security, standing in line to piss, bumping shoulders with thousands of people, $12 drinks and $20 burgers…

      But I guess some people enjoy all that crap.

  2. Buy a piece of junk shotgun.

    Swap it.

    Then scalp the tickets.

    Use the money to get a good shotgun.

    (That having been said, I’d have to say the dumbshit isn’t following this strategy, he could have sold the Benelli for far more than the tickets would have cost.)

    • But you’re forgetting the convenience factor. If you sell something – a gun, car, whatever – yourself, you have to deal with people, questions, non-serious inquiries, serious inquiries from highly irritating people, etc.

      This is much easier, especially if like many people these days you’re a bit afraid of actually having to talk to other people.

      • I realized later that this was in reference to THIS WEEKEND’s game. Fair enough.

        Still I could easily imagine someone deliberately buying a junker and using my (facetious) strategy to trade up to something good.

        As for being afraid to talk to other people… gee I think that’s a societal effect of rampant gun control and it no longer being customary to go about armed.

      • You’re absolutely correct. In fact, Carmax built their entire business model on that principle. Quick and easy, no hassle, no haggle pricing on their cars or your trade-in, for people who want the convenience and loathe contact and/or conflict.

        The problem is that philosophy becomes pervasive and spreads (more like metastasizes) to other spheres of life, like politics and citizenship. People become lulled into an easy, breezy existence where they’re content to trade liberty for security; ending up having and deserving neither.

    • You might be incorrect; playoff tickets are incredibly expensive in Seattle, particularly *good* seats.

      Different people have different priorities. I somehow doubt an o/u Benelli is his home defense gun…

    • Granted, I haven’t gone to the original story and am only going on the quote but…

      What’s stupid about selling or trading one legal possession for another legal possession? There are lots of people that have bought a gun and decided it wasn’t for them and rather than let sit around collecting dust, sell it or trade it for something. I’m not one of them, yet. I don’t expect to be, but never say never. Priorities change. It may be more stupid for some folks to not cash out a gun than to keep it.

      • Well said. I’m set to retire in a few years, and I plan to sell off the vast majority of my collection of military firearms over the course of the following 10 to 20 years and use the proceeds to take multiple vacations around the world.

        They’re just guns, not family heirlooms. I’ve enjoyed collecting them, but I can’t take them with me.

  3. Before you judge, you all know what Seattle-SF tickets are going for, right? A $500 shotgun in trade for seats would be a steal for Josh.

  4. Hey how about that. Old fashioned bartering. If he values a one time ticket to the game over his shotgun and/or his pot, more power to him. Hopefully someone who got a cheap ticket takes him to the cleaners in the swap if he is that desperate for the ticket.

  5. I disagree, I think it’s a good story. Normalizing firearms by showing that they are common items that law-abiding, ‘normal’ people have and trade for other common items is a good thing. We should all try to normalize and mainstream firearms, make them comfortable for people to think about and those people might lose their negative emotions towards them.

    • This story normalizes firearms, but as common clutter, not as everyday necessities. It overshoots the target if people come to regard firearms as mere trinkets, quaint reminders of a bygone era, and anachronistic in modern, urban America.

  6. The Seahawks are one of the few pro-teams I’ve been able to see play.

    I suppose it depends on which Benelli…

    • Wow, that’ dedication – Paying to watch the Seahawks LOSE!

      If that’s dedication, than roughly half the fans at any ball game are dedicated.

      On average, anyway.

      • Home teams win more often than not, and most of the fans are cheering for the home team. So it’s definitely not half of the fans. (Unless you’re talking about Cleveland fans.)

        And Seattle’s 16-1 at home over the last two seasons, so their fans haven’t paid for much losing.

        I wonder if Ed is a 9ers fan …

  7. A circle of shooting buddies I was once in would regularly discharge hundred dollar debts to each other by paying with Makarovs. That, of course was when $100 was the street price for them. I suspect some of those guns eventually ended up back with the original owners.

    • That’s hilarious.

      “Hey, when am I gonna get my money?”

      “Here man, have this Mak.”

      “Goddamnit, Bill, I’ve had this one twice already!”

  8. I’m really, really puzzled as to why some folks here are attacking this guy.

    He’s got a gun, he apparently doesn’t use it much, he figures it might get him some tickets to an NFC championship game (which, for those unaware, is the best possible home game ticket in the NFL). He probably has more guns, so it’s doubtful he’s leaving his wife “defenseless,” as some have suggested. It didn’t say he hated guns, or wants to melt them down to scrap, or anything of the sort.

    It’s not a crime to sell or swap a gun for something else. As Snake mentioned above, it helps to show that a gun is a normal item, not an object of worship (even though some of us treat it as such). It’s a tool with multiple uses, and to some folks, that’s all it is, and that’s fine.

    Sheesh. Lighten up.

    • I’m really, really puzzled as to why some folks here are attacking this guy.

      It is odd, isn’t it? Even if selling it were to leave him without any guns, why would someone be offended by him disposing of his property as he sees fit?

    • Because a bunch of talk about how “enlightened” and “logical” they are, there’s enough POTG that are close minded and judgemental about trivial shit, just like with every other group. It’s depressing but I don’t see it changing, ever.

    • I know it reminded me of stories about gun “buybacks” where people were given Lakers tickets in exchange for their guns. I am realizing that my reflexive reaction to this was unfounded.

    • I have noticed we POTG are quick to turn on one of our own. Nancy Lanza and Christpher Dorner are two examples. Before December 2012 Nancy Lanza would have been a gun owning woman we would have wanted as someone to stand up to Shannon Watts and the MDA crowd. Well, things turned out differently. Lots of POTG put comments on here about police abuses and corruption and MOLON LABE when the gov’ment comes knocking on the door but when one of their own takes a stand and starts shooting the corrupt Christopher Dorner is viewed as the bad guy. I know I am guilt of it too when it comes to Leonard Embody but he deserves it.

    • This is what I was getting at here.

      “I sold/traded one of my shotguns for something I wanted.”

      “O MY GOD U WANT SUM1 TO RAEP UR WIFE”

  9. When I first got the shooting bug, had to go cheap, Once I had more funds, sold the less than high quality weapons to help buy better quality, hope they went to folks just starting out with limited income. All were in good shape and goes bang

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