Tannerite’s biggest claim to fame – besides having a Kleenex-like brand name used to describe pretty much everything in the explosive target category – is that it won’t start a fire when it goes bang. Even if you use 200 lbs. of the stuff as FPSRussia claims to have done above. Meanwhile, Tannerite just got some good news from the US Patent Office which you can read all about after the jump . . .

Tannerite® Claims Victory

US Patent and Trademark Office Publishes Iron-Fisted Reissue of Tannerite® Sports, LLC Exploding Binary Target Patent

Pleasant Hills, OR (July 28, 2013) – Tannerite® Sports, LLC is proud to announce that its reissue patent has been approved by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The reissue patent provides a much broader scope of coverage and protection of their intellectual property. The reissue patent was published on July 23, 2013.

“This is a landmark patent reissue for Tannerite® Sports, LLC as well as the entire binary exploding target category. Tannerite® Sports developed and marketed the first binary exploding target,” said Dan Tanner, president of Tannerite Sports, LLC.  “Other brands of exploding targets that have come out since Tannerite® was first developed are outright imitations. Now, the Tannerite® brand is being recognized as truly unique and innovative and so says the United States Patent and Trademark Office.”

Tannerite® technical consultant Bruce Broline elaborates: “One driving force behind Tannerite® pursuing a patent reissue is that Tannerite®, the brand, has been generically referred to as the chemical composition in all binary targets – this is certainly not the case. That’s akin to Band-Aid®, Xerox®, and Coke® being used to describe entire product categories. The reason we need to make this separation between the Tannerite® brand and other copycats is that we can’t ensure nor do we trust the performance of their products. Ours are entirely safe when used as instructed and as a shot indicator.

“Tannerite® brand targets are formulated from the highest quality raw materials to ensure that they are safe to handle and do not start fires. This cannot be said of many competitors who may use inferior quality raw materials, other incendiary materials, or improper formulations,” continued Broline.

“My ultimate goal was to develop a long range shot indicator that was absolutely safe and could not cause a fire. Tannerite® brand targets do just that,” said Tanner.

“If I were that recreational shooter, practicing hunter or military firearms instructor I’d want to know with certainty my targets could not start a fire.

Why would anyone take a risk with one of the other brands?”

23 Responses to Ka-Boom! Tannerite’s Patent Re-Issued

  1. Good for them. I’ve played with true-brand Tannerite personally a couple times, and I’ve always kinda wondered when I saw the no-name binary explosive at gun shows and the like, especially when they were 30-50% cheaper.

    • +1. While at some level it’s a real compliment to the first-to-market, genericification gwnerally helps the imitators more than the original.

  2. Ahh so that’s why they’re so expensive. I learned a long time ago not to shoot at expensive things.

  3. 200lbs of tannerite? Big deal. One of my friends was an Army tester who build a 600 ton fertilizer bomb (reputed to be the largest bomb of its type ever made) for a test out at White Sands. The crater was about 50 yards deep and 1/4 of mile in diameter. He showed me a picture from the crater party. Awesome.

    • I remember that, was living in Las Cruces at the time, working on WSMR as an EMT, 1980’s. Sadly, too far away to enjoy it. A number of allies brought toys to test. It was advertised as the biggest non nuke explosion in history. The other guy always seems to have better toys!

    • Yes it was and friend got interviewed by the networks. It’s primary purpose was to test the MX mobile shelter concept.

    • Impossible BS about 600 tons of ammonium nitrate bomb – you would be lucky to get 2 feet deep in loam soil from a pile of that very low power explosive. You might get 5 feet deep in powdery sand.

      The first atomic explosion at the Trinity site was equivalent to 18 to 20 kilotons of TNT, thats 18 to 20 thousand TONS of TNT (trinitrotoluene) high explosives. Which is 36 to 40 MILLION POUNDS of TNT. When that lovely little baby was detonated it only made a very shallow crater only 5 feet deep and 330 yards wide, barely noticeable in the local landscape.

      Prior to the atomic bomb the did a pile test of 100 tons of TNT high explosives, 200,000 pounds worth. All they got was a crater 5 feet deep and 30 feet wide. Not much to show for all the effort of stacking it up.

  4. I’m glad it got renewed – its just a challenge to find places nearby that will let me shoot it. Tannerite definitely will kick up rocks and debris, and everyone is concerned about liability these days.

  5. If that was indeed 200lbs of Tannerite…would he really need any special permit to use it? My understanding is no…

    • You need to have a federal explosives license to own/use/possess more than 50lbs of mixed tannerite(which is just ammonium nitrate, found at any farm store as commercial fertilizer, and aluminum ground into a powder and coated on the nitrate, easy and legal to diy) but less than 50 lbs does not require anything, can’t have more than that in black powder and other regular civilian legal explosives either. If you manage to get that FEL you can play with any amount of anything If you find a place to use it.

      • forgive me if I’m wrong, but isn’t Ammonium Nitrate one of the ingredients used to cook meth? I remember at a farm supply store they had big signs warning meth cookers about buying it. If so, wouldn’t the cookers be all about Tannerite if they found out about it? I doubt they’re writing down driver’s license info for purchasing it.

  6. “In Russia Tannerite Bomb You!”

    Please, if you’ve banned super models at least ban this guy as well, please, maybe,?

  7. Never have understood the fascination of Tannerite for some folks. To each their own, as long as no one gets hurt.

      • Well, yea, I get that.

        But it also makes a mess, and someone has to clean that up. Whenever I go to the range, the Range Gnomes never seem to clean up my mess, so I have to do it.

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