MD School Suspends 11-Year for Saying the Word “Gun”

 Go Bobcats!

“Bruce Henkelman of Huntingtown says his son, a sixth grader at Northern Middle School in Owings (MD), was talking with friends about the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre when the bus driver hauled him back to school to be questioned by the principal, Darrel Prioleau.” Uh-oh. “‘The principal told me that with what happened at Sandy Hook if you say the word ‘gun’ in my school you are going to get suspended for 10 days,’ Henkelman said in an interview with WMAL.com.” GTFO. Surely the youngster said something threatening. Not according to his old man . . .

According to his father, he neither threatened nor bullied anyone.

“He said, I wish I had a gun to protect everyone. He wanted to defeat the bad guys. That’s the context of what he said,” Henkelman said. “He wanted to be the hero.”

So . . . “I wish I’d been there with an MP7. I had would have shot that motherfucker right between the fucking eyes.” Something along those lines perhaps? Anyway, the principal and the sheriff swung into action.

The boy was questioned by the principal and a sheriff’s deputy, who also wanted to search the family home without a warrant, Henkelman said. “He started asking me questions about if I have firearms, and [the deputy said] he’s going to have to search my house. Search my house?  I just wanted to know what happened.”

No search was performed, and the deputy left Henkelman’s home after the father answered questions in a four-page questionnaire issued by the Sheriff’s Office.

So some committee’s developed a four-page (double-spaced?) questionnaire that can identify potential spree killers? About how many hours a day does your son play Call of Duty? Does he experiment with explosives? Does he put news clippings about mass murders on the basement walls?

[As always, TTAG recommends a strict ask for a lawyer and STFU policy when dealing with police enquiries.]

The incident went down last December. Mr. Henkelman says he’s come forward now after a five-year-old Calvert County boy was suspended for bringing a cap gun on a school bus.” I guess the Bobcats got his tongue.

comments

  1. avatar Scott says:

    Maybe you meant “There’s nothing they can ask you that should be answered without a lawyer present” ??

    I’d LOVE to see this questionaire…

    1. avatar Robert Farago says:

      I confused myself there. Text amended.

      1. avatar Pascal says:

        You should reach out and FOIA that questionnaire

        1. avatar Matt in FL says:

          If someone tells me how to do it, I’ll do it.

        2. avatar William says:

          And wait 2.5 years.

    2. avatar Totenglocke says:

      I’m sure question #1 is something like “Are you a loyal follower of our Lord and Savior, Barack Obama?”

  2. avatar Eric says:

    It’s no longer time to STFU. It’s time to tell them to FOAD.

  3. avatar jp says:

    Sounds like a clear cut case of criminal stupidity on the part of the principal. And the sheriff. Unbelievable.

  4. avatar Rokurota says:

    It sounds idiotic, but I’m willing to give the bus driver the benefit of the doubt. He or she may have heard “I wish I had a gun… so I could shoot…them all,” or something ambiguous like that amidst the noise. Like the saying goes, nothing good happens on a school bus.

    1. avatar Bill says:

      You are probably right. In that context, it does warrant possible further investigation, but not the son AND father being treated like criminals and an attempt at a warrantless search of the house and the question of “do you have any firearms at home?” which nobody’s business but the family’s.

      After a quick sorting out, the polie should no longer be involved and the child NOT BE SUSPENDED!

      1. avatar Rokurota says:

        Oh, I in no way excuse the principal’s reaction. He should own up to what’s right.

        If I was a betting man, I’d bet the dad went ballistic upon being visited by the law and badmouthed everyone. Then the principal, his pride wounded, decided to punish the family with the token suspension, which somehow grants him some degree of righteousness.

  5. avatar Shire-man says:

    Ten days for saying a word?
    Back when I was in middle school I got two days for selling my peers individual NoDoz tablets. Something that would likely find me in handcuffs today.

    1. avatar CyborgCowboy says:

      When I was in Middle School all of 14 years ago, I once got suspended for three days for getting in a fight. Well, actually I got beaten up. And was suspended for it. This is the next logical step down that road.

      1. avatar Crashbbear says:

        Same here. (The 14 years part) our school system adopted a “zero tolerance policy” for fighting and the like. I got in a fight in 6th grade and lost my recess privalege for 3 day. Got in a fight the next year, and got suspended for 180 days, and I wasn’t even the aggressor, I just did more damage to my assailant than he did to me. Ah, how neutralizing the threat has its consequences.

        1. avatar Ralph says:

          I had a fight in 6th grade during recess and kicked the schoolyard bully’s @ss. I got patted on the back by two gym teachers who congratulated me on teaching the kid a lesson.

          Times have changed.

        2. avatar Taurus609 says:

          Ralph, you must be older than I thought, my mom would be 96 if still alive. She was small but she would have kicked your a$$! Good answer though.

      2. avatar Taurus609 says:

        Ralph, what was the girls name?

        1. avatar Ralph says:

          Ask your mom.

  6. avatar Rokurota says:

    “…once the school official concluded that all the young man wanted to do was to be safe at school and that he posed no risk to anyone, the suspension was really inappropriate,” said Sonya Kumar, an ACLU staff attorney.

    So the ACLU now acknowledges that guns: 1) keep you safe; 2) don’t make you a risk. Love it.

    1. avatar CyborgCowboy says:

      Someone make a photocopy, that might be useful if they try to contradict it in the future.

      1. avatar int19h says:

        ACLU have never said that guns “make you a risk” or “make you less safe”. They have said that they, as an organization, don’t consider 2A to be an individual right, and do not agree to the standing judicial interpretation of it (per Heller). There is a big difference there. They purposely ignore 2A, but they do not attack it.

        Seriously, what’s with all the ACLU demonization? They are the only organization that focuses on the rest of the Bill of Rights. You know, all the other things it lists, aside from 2A – and it’s not like there’s a shortage of organizations who are willing and able to stand for the latter.

        1. avatar Jim Bullock says:

          Seriously, what’s with all the ACLU demonization? They are the only organization that focuses on the rest of the Bill of Rights.

          Not exactly. First, the Bill of Rights records, but does not create, some intrinsic human rights. So, the Bill of Rights, while important, isn’t important because it creates rights. It’s important as a reminder to people who should know better. There are several organizations that focus on individual rights in the West, especially the US. Take the EFF for one, which is way more aggressive and effective than the ACLU in freedom of communication, association, sharing information, and so on.

          Second, the ACLU has drifted pretty far afield from advocating individual, autonomous rights, to some broader ideas of “rights.” The terms of art are “negative rights” meaning more or less “stuff about which you get left alone” vs. “positive rights” meaning more or less “stuff you are entitled to.” Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech… is a negative right. You have the right to be left alone about what you say & don’t need anyone’s permission. Everyone has the human right to adequate food, housing, health care, and meaningful work… asserts positive rights. The challenge with these is always how to satisfy them – who provides them? It’s *stuff* that’s gotta come from somewhere, meaning some*one*.

          Finally, as touched on above in the article and comments the ACLU is willing to advocate for its own interpretation of what the portfolio of human rights should be. So, it doesn’t matter that it’s settled law in the US that the 2A is an individual right. The ACLU has its interpretation, and will continue to work energetically to get that view enacted in legislation and policy and most likely without seeking a broad referendum on what “the people” seek, say by proposing a new amendment.

          They’ll pick their idea of what “civil liberties” should be over black letter law or established precedent – they’re about bringing the rest of us around to their right way of thinking. The do not have the humility to defer to any other understanding, or to a list in the constitution, or etc.

          If you’re curious, there are a couple books out by insiders chronicling their experience with the mission-drift of the ACLU. There’s similar chronicles from insiders of mission-drift in other organizations. Was it the Sierra Club that was advocating population control & closed borders as an environmental imperative a few years back? The ACLU is no longer about ensuring laws and public behavior in the US follow the Bill of Rights. It’s about advocating an expanded set of “rights” by any means necessary, and they’ve chosen the law and the courts. As such, it’s in part a false flag operation. That’s what pisses people off.

          FWIW a couple months back, I congratulated the ACLU by email on weighing in on some free speech issues (in partnership with the EFF), and noted that I’d support them financially if they did only this sort of thing vs. The other. They wrote me back twice to explain to me first about all the other good work they do, the stuff I object to, then to tell me why I am wrong.

          I was just pointing out that as a donor-supported organization they might want to be aware of at least one donor they won’t get because of their mission-drift. There’s a cost to their choices. Thought they’d want to know. They couldn’t say “Thanks for the kudos on the one issue. Sorry we don’t have your support on other parts of our agenda, but we understand.” They had to try to fix me.

          That’s a problem of many activist groups, really. You’d like to think of them as ad-hoc collections of people who happen to have independently come to similar ideas, who gather so they can work together. The agenda is set by the members before they join. The group is a mechanism.

          In practice, so many groups are a source of meaning, belonging and undigested ideas for their members. The members come empty, and the groups see their mission as filling them with The Truth.

          That’s backwards. That’s also the blueprint for the vast majority of “movement” and “issue” groups in the US. The empty shall be filled.

          (Incidentally, I read the NRA as much more a convenience for people with independently developed similar views than an indoctrination machine – the opposite of how it’s described by the anti-gun people. We can’t let them succeed with that reframe. If the NRA is just one more outside funded indoctrination machine it loses political legitimacy.)

        2. avatar William says:

          I’m gonna hazard a guess that it might be the ACLU’s “the Bill of Rights Consists of Nine Individual Rights and One… Well, Something-or-Another” policy!

        3. avatar jwm says:

          int19th, this particular incident wasn’t really about 2a. It was about a student being harassed and questioned for an innocent remark and about a deputy attempting to search a house with no warrant based on this flimsy reason.

          If that doesn’t bring out the ACLU then they truly don’t have the right to call themselves a civil right group. Civil liberties should include being secure from unreasonable searches and large over reactions by school admins and over reaching deputies.

    2. avatar dwb says:

      holy crap, i missed that. frame that sentence, before the ACLU attorney who said it gets suspended themselves for spouting common sense.

  7. avatar racer88 says:

    My son’s name is Gunnar. Good thing he doesn’t go to one of these schools where people reflexively wet their pants when a kid picks up “Idaho” in the United States puzzle.

    Oy veh!

    1. avatar Accur81 says:

      Cool name, sir.

      1. avatar racer88 says:

        Thanks! It’s only a happy coincidence that I’m a “gun enthusiast,” and my son’s name is Gunnar. It’s a traditional Swedish name. Neither my wife nor I are Swedish. But, my wife thought it was a cool name. And, I agreed. And, there wouldn’t be 4 of them in his class all with the same trendy name.

        He’s a big hockey player (age 12 now). A good name for an NHL player… or a race car driver! 😀

    2. avatar Will says:

      Good thing. A while back there was a kid who couldn’t hear. His name was Hunter. In S.E.E, the sign for his name is two hands held like pistols, shaken up and down. He signed his name one day at school and promptly got in trouble.

      http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2012/08/daniel-zimmerman/omg-omg-a-deaf-kid-signing-his-name-omg/

  8. avatar Frank Williams says:

    Let’s just hope no one in gym class says he’s working on getting huge guns.

  9. avatar JT says:

    The way this is going, I foresee kids getting in trouble for even more stupid things. I envision something along the lines of “POSSIBLE MASS SHOOTING THWARTED BY POLICE AND SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. A student was overheard ‘calling shotgun’ as he and his friends were leaving the school at the end of the day. The exchange was overheard by the principal who quickly notified a school resource officer who detained the students in the parking lot while waiting for the SWAT team to arrive. Police believe the students were possibly choosing between themselves which weapons to use to assault the school. The vehicle the students were attempting to flee in as well as all of there homes were searched by police for weapons but none were found. Due to lack of further evidence, the students were released from police custody. The school however expelled the group for violating the ‘zero tolerance’ policy regarding weapons.”

    1. avatar Robert M says:

      That sounds almost possible I fear it might be a true store at some point.

      Thanks
      Robert

  10. avatar ThomasR says:

    This not insanity; this is one of many very effective methods to “brainwash” as per AG Holder and to continue to “fundamentally change” as per Obama; our culture from a people that believe in limited government, individual freedom and personal responsibility; to a bunch of powerless, helpless, mindlessly rule obeying drones.

    The Progressive/ Socialist ideal to create their “utopia” on earth.

  11. avatar GS650G says:

    I enrolled my kid in private school for next year, I’m done with gubment schools.

    1. avatar tdiinva says:

      I would check out the school policies if I were you. Private schools often set policies to match that of the local public shools. Sometimes it’s required for insurance purposes but you will find privates schools to be as politically correct as public schools. Sometimes the only advantage of sending your child to a private school is better teachers and more disciplined environment. However, just remember that a private school is not bound by the Bill of Rights.

      1. avatar Bryan says:

        Not all private schools have their heads bass-ackwards. On the last day of school this year my daughters class of 6th graders takes on the 7th graders in the annual water gun fight! Sanctioned and encouraged at her Catholic school. Full auto encouraged!

        1. avatar tdiinva says:

          Where did I say “all?” I said check it out. Insurance companies generally put a clause into their liability policies for private schools that they follow the procedures for the local public district. For example, even though my son’s Catholic high school did not bus their students they were still required to shut down for bad weather when Fairfax County did even though they were in eastern Fairfax which often did not have more than a dusting of snow while the western part o the county had 6″

        2. avatar Bryan says:

          You didn’t, and checking it out is always a good idea.

          Sometimes the only advantage of sending your child to a private school is better teachers and more disciplined environment.

          This is only reason to send your child. Although I would also add better environment period. With a gubment school you get what you pay for.

  12. avatar Sammy says:

    This is diabolical! The school systems are making kids become traumatized over the administration’s phony, manufactured gun paranoia. They are brainwashing our children in front of our eyes. THIS is the reason home schooling is spurned. The real battle for our country has shifted to our classrooms and the prize is our children’s hearts and minds. The communist indoctrination can on longer wait for the kids to get to college. This is the most threatening anti 2a story I have heard to date and it goes well beyond 2a. This is for our way of life. What’s next Obama Youth, oh wait, they’ve done that already.

    1. avatar Alexander says:

      You guys overuse the word “communism” so heavily. What happens here, whatever it is, has nothing to do with any communistic ideology. I have grown in communistic Russia, and I never ever neither seen nor heard even a single episode of such stupidity. So please don’t blame anybody for what you people invented yourself.

      1. avatar Lurker says:

        Maybe that’s because your commies had ALL the guns and ours don’t.

        1. avatar int19h says:

          Gun ownership was legal for civilians in the USSR. Handguns were restricted, but shotguns and rifles were not, although you had to have a hunting license to purchase one (but even that wasn’t the case under Khruschev, when shotguns were sold literally over the counter).

          Also, last two school years had a “beginner’s military preparedness” class, where all students were taught to field strip an AK and shoot it.

      2. avatar jerry says:

        yeah, no stupidity of any type in the Soviet Union.

      3. avatar William says:

        It’s a sign of lack of sophistication in political understanding. The only cure is to ACTUALLY study history.

        If you don’t study history, the world’s a mystery. And you believe everything can be explained in terms of communism.
        If you’d read the definition of fascism according to Mussolini – well, I’ve done that here many times, but they’re too stubborn and stupid to learn anything.

    2. avatar Roscoe says:

      Welcome aboard, Sammy.

  13. avatar Cold Frog says:

    It is time to get a lawyer to defend the child and to get the suspension reversed; the suspension-gun paranoia is out of control. I bet the gun control nimrods are loving it or even fueling the flames.

  14. avatar LongPurple says:

    Just when you think the hoplophobes have reached the limit of stupidity, they reach way down deep and out-do themselves.

    1. avatar Stacy says:

      It’s not stupidity, it’s Pavlovian conditioning. Why would you expel a kindergartner for having a squirt gun? So that they’ll forever after associate anything related to “gun” with a traumatic event. These people aren’t stupid, they’re evil. It starts today with banning hugs and toy weapons, and ends in twenty years with reeducation camps and mass graves.

      1. avatar LongPurple says:

        You assume a reaction that is contrary to my own experience.
        Around the age of 12, I was forced to throw a home-made slingshot into a lake by a police officer enforcing a ban on such “weapons”.
        My reaction was to go home and make another “weapon” to replace it.
        If the intent of such “zero tolerance” stupidity is that Pavlovian conditioning you suspect, then they have compounded such stupidity with even greater stupidity — expecting not only to get away unchalleged with such a plot, but expecting a docile reaction to that stupidity.

        1. avatar Ryan says:

          I have been very surprised at how successful (and surprisingly persistent) high order conditioning can be when used early and often on a large number of test subjects…

      2. avatar William says:

        It’s actually Operant Conditioning, so you’re close.

  15. avatar Hal J. says:

    Here’s a little perspective on how things have changed:

    Back in the late ’70s, I was in my high school’s production of “Oklahoma!”, playing the part of Jud. The script calls for Jud to fire a handgun in the air, and the prop department brought up a cap gun. Thinking that this was rather lame, I said “Wouldn’t a real gun loaded with blanks work better? My dad has a .357 Magnum Ruger Blackhawk that he’d let me use.”

    The director’s reaction? “Cool.”

    For two weeks, I brought the .357 to school with me and used it on stage during performances and rehearsals. I think it’s fair to speculate that school officials would react somewhat differently these days.

    1. avatar Pulatso says:

      I think the phrase “screaming bowel-evacuating conipition” might describe said reaction.

      1. avatar Totenglocke says:

        Probably because most of our educators were people picking an easy major when they enrolled in college just to avoid the draft.

        1. avatar William says:

          True. Mine was Journalism!

  16. avatar Smaj says:

    Yet another of example of a youngster being singled out, terrorized and punished for something firearms related. There is a concerted effort within the public education system to demonize, harass, intimidate and punish all things firearms related. If I had school age kids I would get them out of public schools yesterday.

  17. avatar dunsho says:

    bullshite, got to be more to this. kid must of made a gun with his fingers and went “pow pow” while his friends where laughing and karate chopping the imaginary bullets out of the air.

    1. avatar Roscoe says:

      Facts not in evidence.

  18. avatar Hal J. says:

    The word “gun” is doubleplus ungood. The Ministry of Truth will correct this child’s oldthink thoughtcrimes.

  19. avatar In Memphis says:

    If he was there with a gun and stopped the shooting then there would be nothing to help push the adgenda. So it was a threat, against the grabbers. Gatta think outside the box a little!

    1. avatar Stacy says:

      Apparently you missed the story about the Canadian kid who stopped an actual stabbing, only to be scolded (actually, his family scolded) by the school for intervening directly instead of screaming for help and then watching events unfold.

    2. avatar RJOGuillory says:

      …not being of a particular religious background…I decided to pay for the last 4 years of my son’s schooling…by sending him to Christian Brother’s High School in Sacremento……and boy, am I glad I did that…! At the age of 18 he was hired back by the school to teach/coach polevaulting..and he has maintained his relationship with the school for the last several years…thought Im not terribly happy with his choice…the boy is graduating from college soon..and will be a commissioned officer in the US Army…I think getting him out of public school..and putting him with men and women who know how to develop kids….to properly grow kids…I wouldn’t put my kid in public school now…even if they paid me to do so…

      Regards,

      RJ O’Guillory
      Author-
      Webster Groves-The Life of an Insane Family

      1. avatar William says:

        Wonder if they taught him how to make brandy?

  20. avatar Derrick says:

    Jesus, that’s F-cked. That’s all I think when I read this stuff.

  21. avatar Anon in CT says:

    This really worries my. What happens to the little kid who doesn’t know better and mentions that Daddy wen to the range on the weekend, or some such? How can you properly gun-proof your kids if you have to teach them to never even say the word in public?

  22. avatar germanguy says:

    Ok now i have new evidence that some americans are really crazy. What the f.. is happening to you? I thought and learned at school that america is the contry where you can say anything you want. Isn´t in you´re Bill of rights the first thing written there the right of free speach or got i something wrong?
    Also to prefend school shootings it´s not a solution to ban words like gun. Oh am i know baned here too? 😀
    It´s also not a real good solution to let the teachers or guards handle guns in school. Children should be children not prisoners. Everytime I see pictures of american schools on the television i´m really scared. In germany the juvenile detention looks much like this, only the grid on the windows is missing.
    The best prefention from school shootings is a good relationship between the teachers and the students, so that students which have problems of anykind can go to them and talk without fear. The example above isn´t a good one for this.
    Here in germany this is also not in every school the case, but our teachers try. ( At least the most) It is also good when kids can count on the reliability of any person they trust. That should at first be the parents/grandparents or other relatives and than teachers and coaches and other people they may deal everyday. Than teachers should work something out to prefent bullying, that would also help alot. Here in germany we have school psychologists and social worker, where the kids can go to if they have problems at home or with other students. Okay we don´t have this stuff in every state but in some.
    May you´re americans should think about this stuff a time and do this instead of banning words.

    1. avatar Jeff says:

      the average American school has all of the things that you’re talking about.

      maybe you don’t understand fully the problems created by beaurocratic rigidity in American schools – e.g. the “zero tolerance” rules that caused this incident, whereby a student can be punished for saying or doing something that was not wrong, and may have even been morally right (defending ones self against a bully in a fight), but will still get you punished because it comes close enough to something that is forbidden in the rules.

      in other words, the teachers and school administrators no longer are allowed to use common sense to treat the students like a normal authority figure outside of school would. instead, they’re forced to strictly adhere to a list of ridiculously long and ever-changing rules that define what is “acceptable”, and the teachers are never allowed to disagree on a case-by-case basis. even if they were, most teachers today seem to believe in this sort of approach to problems within the school, even when something isn’t really even a problem at all – as it is in this story.

      “zero tolerance” is a huge problem with American schools today, and frankly it has little to do with any of the things you’ve described. it’s not the parents’ fault, and it’s not the children’s’ fault. though you have one thing very right: it’s the fault of the school administrations that develop their rules and policies based on a virtual assumption that school is to be operated like a prison, and all children are bad and are potential criminals in all that they say or do.

      why anyone is surprised when these children grow up to be cynical and jaded against authority figures and systems is frankly ridiculous.

      1. avatar germanguy says:

        Yes the common sence is really missing. Here in germany we don´t have no tolerance rules. We had politicians that would try it, but the media and people shit storm stoped them.
        If anyone has did something wrong when a school shooting occur it is most of the time not the teacher. It is the whole system. It is the missing of good parenting and the missing of good teachers, with really good empathy towards theire students.
        The rules here in germany aren´t as harsh as you´re one, but we have them. The only difference is that our teachers/principals/ other school officials thnik that suspencions/forthing to change the school is the last thing they want to do, because this punishment is for a kid really hard. Before they do something like that they will deal with incidents in many ways and try to get it straight in these way. I guess that is the commen scence you´re missing in american schools alot.

        1. avatar Roscoe says:

          “Common Sense” hardly has the meaning it once did because in America the progressive liberal Democrats, the overwhelmingly left leaning mainstream media and the gun grabbing extremists have so exhaustively hijacked the term to mean “because we say it’s so, it’s ‘common sense'”.

          To use the term “common sense” as a reliable description of a logical outcome of reality can no longer be trusted in today’s extremist fueled political environment.

        2. avatar Jeff says:

          When a school shooting takes place, I fully agree that the first place you should be looking is the child’s parental and home life situation, as well as their mental state.

          However, the story we’re discussing is not a school shooting. It’s not even a fight, or a situation where the student did something bad or wrong.

          All that happened is that the student said the word “gun”.

          This story is the very embodiment of the failure of “zero tolerance” policy in American schools to allow teachers and school administrators to rationalize their response in a way in which they can act like normal human beings. “Zero tolerance” promotes a robotic, black and white thought process that provides no benefit whatsoever.

        3. avatar germanguy says:

          Jeff,
          that´s right school shouting is now not the subject.
          In the first part of my first comment i was telling you about the occured incident. I don´t get the zero tolerance thingi. Really i don´t get it.
          Here it seams that you´re teaching you´re children that they don´t have to ask the rules only that they have to act like they are.
          This kids will maybe become someday judges or member of a jury. If they are then thinking in black and white only they will miss some points of the true story.
          A friend of my was in america as an exchange student, she had to study a realy thik book with rules in it. She showed it to me and some other friends. We all thought that you have to have a real shitty high school time, when you have to life to all the rules.

  23. avatar Matt in FL says:

    I don’t know what you guys are complaining about. I think this was a perfectly reasonable reaction by the bus driver/school administration/Sheriff’s Office.

    1. avatar RJOGuillory says:

      ..yes…indoctrinated stooges almost always feel that way about basic infringements of people’s rights…it is why so many of you ended up dead in Russia, China…Hitlers Germany..etc..I feel sorry for you and any children you may reproduce….very sad…what America is about to become….from people like yourself who see no inherent violation of anyone’s rights…all because the person used a “word”?

      ….you and the bus driver need to be lovers or something..?

      Regards,

      RJ O’Guillory
      Author-
      Webster Groves-The Life of an Insane Family

      1. avatar Matt in FL says:

        Fish on, boys!

      2. You don’t know Matt very well, do you? You are the reason people have to put “/sarc” in their sarcastic posts. Not a dip your toe in the water first kinda guy are you?

        1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

          OH sh!t
          LMAO!!
          Fish on indeed

        2. avatar RJOGuillory says:

          …well I am a bit brain-damaged…after having driven off a 200 foot cliff in 2010 at 70 mph….and well no, you are correct…I am unfamiliar with Matt in Fl….? Am I to understand Matt was being saracastic..and I missed it?

          Well…it was a good response anyway…that is..if he meant it…ha!

          Regards,

          RJ O’Guillory
          Author-
          Webster Groves-The Life of an Insane Family

          p.s.- I don’t get the “fish” reference….I know I’m a little slow after I have two days of a dozen or so grande-mal seizures….but what is the Fish thing about?

        3. avatar Matt in FL says:

          “Fish on” is just a way to say “I got one!”

          If you’ve got 2-3 guys fishing in a small boat, especially for something that runs, like Tarpon, you holler “Fish on!” to let the other guys know to pull their lines out of the water so you don’t get tangled up.

    2. avatar William says:

      C’mon, Matt. Care to tighten yer ole pal up with whatever it is you’re sipping this morning?

  24. avatar Anonymous says:

    Mass hysteria – no reason.

  25. avatar flboots says:

    It looks like 1st admend. rights are only for liberals, who can say anything they want. If your young or conservative you don’t have the right to free speech.

  26. avatar Pulatso says:

    I have no children and probably never will, and when I read stories like this I’m kinda glad I don’t.

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Tip Pulatso,
      Start with Grandkids first. They are a treat!

  27. avatar dan says:

    and you still turn YOUR children over to these morons and criminals..that pose as authority……the best thing for the child is a permanent expulsion from this anti freedom school and its staff…..and you are forced to pay for the indoctrination of your child through taxes………..way past time if this country is to survive……

  28. avatar TacoNinja says:

    Cops shouldn’t be able to search without a warrant or a dire belief that someone’s life is in danger that they can then justify in court… Maybe we should do what they did in Indiana where it’s legal to shoot a cop if they are breaking the law(i.e. breaking into your house to commit an illegal search)… Those Indianans aren’t so crazy after all perhaps?

  29. avatar Mr. Obvious says:

    The suspension is unconstitutional, as it’s based on a policy that suspends kids for simply using the word “gun”, irrespective of whether it’s disruptive to the learning environment or not. I sincerely hope the school is sued for this.

    The whole “let’s bust down kids for even mentioning guns” / suspend kids who are the victims of physical assaults for defending themselves is part of a concerted effort to break the firearms / self-defense culture in the coming generation. Shut the effort down now.

  30. avatar El Cid says:

    Lmao. Matt for best #1 troll. Good giggles. I was suspended in kindergarten, another boy threatened to stab me with a bark chip. I let him know that that would be a poor choice and that I would kindly return the favor. I guess I messed up by having the assault bark chip (complete with bayonet lug and “thing that goes up”) because I was suspended. My faith in authority figures in school died that day as my ganpappy was tanning my hide for getting sent home.

  31. avatar Ralph says:

    Here’s the ultimate in school hoplophobia stupidity: a 3 1/2 y.o. deaf child can’t sign his own name (“Hunter”) because it looks like a gun.

    http://www.care2.com/causes/deaf-childs-sign-for-his-name-violates-gun-policy-says-school-district.html

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Wow. Just wow. I’m speechless.

  32. avatar Jon R. says:

    Public schools, helping to raise the next generation of irrational pussies.

  33. avatar Jeh says:

    What happened to America? I remember stories my grandfather would tell me about disputes being settled with fights and hand shakes, and lawyers being burned at the steak for implying lawsuits. Now adays everyone is sue happy and everyone flips sh*t over everything. This school is a great example of the hell this country is becoming and its pretty damn depressing.

    1. avatar Ralph says:

      Yeah, parent now have to decide between two bad choices for their kids: don’t send ’em to school and they’ll be ignorant, or send them to school where they’ll learn to be stupid.

    2. avatar Jeff says:

      “the system” (geesh, I hate saying that, but what better phrase can describe it?) has a vested interest in disavowing children at an early age from developing the belief that they can solve their own problems and conflicts without involving authority figures and the law. the reasons why differ, but by and large it seems to be a byproduct of a society that today is structured by lawyers and authoritarians who simply cannot accept that adults, and even children, should be allowed to settle their own affairs without involvement of the legal/governmental apparatus.

    3. avatar William says:

      They were able to save the steak, RIGHT?

  34. avatar Aharon says:

    When are the public (government) schools going to require the boys to change their first names to girls’ names and to start wearing dresses?

    1. avatar tdiinva says:

      That’s in the transexual sensitivity training section.

    2. avatar Jon says:

      They already have them wearing girls pants…

  35. avatar sdog says:

    man the folks in my state have LOST their minds.

  36. avatar 9x19 says:

    This just in….kid suspended for a month for THINKING about a gun.

  37. avatar E. Jones says:

    When society as a whole loses esteem for the ideals of virtue and honor, this is the inevitable result. Everyone acts feminine. Instead of respecting others, sorting out problems reasonably, and going on our respective ways, we as a society now prefer to deal with nothing in a forthright way, and to prevail upon authority to solve our problems -the mentality of slaves, not free men. The authorities, handicapped by the same mentality, cannot deal with things in a straightforward way either. That would require creativity and independent thought, two traits actively discouraged in modern society. So, they just refer to the almighty policy manual, an unappealable authority written by a committee of wise, anonymous bureaucrats.

    Truly, a wretched state of affairs.

  38. avatar RexPowerColt says:

    My 10th grade english teacher allowed my class to do a presentation orally on whatever we wanted. So I chose gun control and she had no problem. She was glad I chose a “political” topic. So was I. This was like a solid month ago, I believe.

  39. avatar Ardent says:

    I can envision school administrators who are actively anti gun and anti freedom, what I can’t do is conceive of them having an organized plan (for anything, really). I suspect, drawing on my own experiences that when we encounter this level of stupidity it is what it is; the actions of a stupid person.

    Hanlon’s razor suggests that one should never attribute to malice what is adequately explained by incompetence.

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