New from Henry Repeating Arms: The Original Henry Rifle

Anthony Imperato holds The Original Henry Rifle (ish) (courtesy The Truth About Guns)

Henry jefe Anthony Imperato tells TTAG that the New Jersey gunmaker’s busy building The Original Henry Rifle. The “we don’t call it a reproduction rifle” reproduction rifle is set to ship in September, complete with one-piece octagonal barrel, folding ladder rear sight and fancy American walnut buttstock with hardened brass buttplate. It’s “virtually identical” to its history-making forerunner; .44-40 caliber cartridge compatibility being the sole exception (the 1860 version shot .44 Rimfire). Well, there’s another key difference: the modern Henry is less likely to see action than a certain gun blogger I could name. And OK, another one: price. A vintage Henry with pedigree can fetch a cool quarter mil. Henry will sell you a modern version for a mere $2300. Cheap at half the price.

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About Robert Farago

Robert Farago is the Publisher of The Truth About Guns (TTAG). He started the site to explore the ethics, morality, business, politics, culture, technology, practice, strategy, dangers and fun of guns.

55 Responses to New from Henry Repeating Arms: The Original Henry Rifle

  1. avatarTyler Kee says:

    Oh man that’s a beauty.

  2. avatarIng says:

    Sweet! Wantwantwantwant. Now about that $2300 price tag…

  3. avatarإبليس says:

    Is the Pedersoli clone still around?

  4. avatarHuman Being says:

    You know, they do make nice guns…but I really would like a .22LR lever from them that has a loading gate (or such). Having the mechanical skill to make reproductions is all fine and well, but guys you have the skill to make something innovative of that quality too…

    • avatarjwm says:

      I can’t recall ever seeing a .22 with a reciever loading gate. What gives? Is it a technical impossibility or just never been a demand? I’ve owned 3 lever action .22′s a mossberg, winchester and marlin. All had the spring loaded rod that had to be pulled from the tube mag before loading.

      • avatarMichael B. says:

        I heard somewhere that someone did it for a few hundred rifles but IDK. I think the current setup is fine.

    • avatarAharon says:

      I believe the reason .22 cal lever actions are built on using a tube loading process is that otherwise pressing the .22 cal bullets into a receiver loading gate can result in the small rounds becoming deformed.

      • avatarjwm says:

        Aharon, that makes as much sense as any explanation I’ve heard. My .30-30 has always been feed jacketed ammo, which would help preserve the integrity of the projectile. Other lever guns like the .44s and the .357′s probably also get used mostly with jacketed rounds.

        Factor in the small size of the .22 and the soft lead that probably covers all the bases.

  5. avatarChubby says:

    $2300!?!???!

    You can get the Uberti clone for around $1k!!

  6. avatarBlehtastic says:

    Side loading gates are not optional on lever actions, although I suppose it’s fine if you just want it from a historical perspective.

  7. avatarRoscoe says:

    Beautiful carbines; I have two Big Boys, one in 44mag and one in 357mag. The 44s’ a bit hard on the upper arm but I’m too stubborn to use a butt pad so I deal with it.
    They’re a little clunky to load and reload the brass cartrigde tubes when you’re used to revolvers or auto feed firearms. Best to take your time and enjoy the experience. One can speed up the loading if necessary with an appropriate length of PVC capped at one end with a cotter pin or threaded cap at the other. Still clunky, and you must slide the brass cartridge tube cap off for the rounds to slide in from the end of the brass tube at a safe angle, but it does speed up the process if you must be in a hurry.

    I sure do like the looks of that long barreled repro Original Henry with the classic rear ladder sight, though. I wonder how long it’ll be before I quit resisting.

  8. avatarWyatt says:

    No collapsing stock or picatinny rails. Lame.

    • avatarSwarf says:

      No wanker rails on your lever action got you down? Mossberg has just the thing to put that spring back in your step!

      • avatarGyufygy says:

        Hehehehehehehehe, still waaaaaaant!

        Edit: Holy crap! $535?! Hell yes, I’m gonna get my tactidouche on!

        • avatarAlphaGeek says:

          You joke, but I’m totally buying a 464spx after my spending on competition gear & reloading stuff slows down.

          Hell, I’m thinking about taking the 9422 out to the workshop and fitting some rail sections to it this weekend.

  9. avatarJAS says:

    Gorgeous rifle – WANT. Hope it comes with left-hand oven mitt for rapid fire :).

  10. avatarChuck in IL says:

    Yes it’s pretty. Yes it will say Henry on it. But will it be twice the rifle my Italian knockoff is? No.

  11. avatarRJTravel says:

    Since it is a pre-1898 repro it seems to me that it would fall under the ‘antique’ repro definition and not be subject to FFL requirements, BG checks, etc. Am I correct?

  12. avatardane says:

    sir for henry to reproduce this 1860 classic rifle would be like colt reproduceing the 1894 colt bisley flat top target mod these are two very sought after firearms with the henry rifle being the most expensi pay two grand for it now and a few years down the road sell it for double that or more this is a good investment gun so buy one if you can for me iam gonna buy two

  13. avatarfrank gioia says:

    love the fact that you are finally doing the original(long over due) but 2300$ is a little steep.i could get a beautiful henry 44 40 original from Cimarron for 1,350.i was just about to order one when I saw the promo for yours.bring your price down to 1,500$ mr imperato and you have a deal.but hurry I am dying for one!!

  14. avatarJohn says:

    This is a first. 1860 Henry that is made in the United States since the Civil War…Awesome! Henry has come home, from USA parts and labor. Now that’s like it was and should be. Protect the USA and buy USA made here. The NRA Should have a National Rifle selected that is made in the USA. Winchesters are no longer made USA with part and labor from around the world. It is nice to have a rifle that feels like a well crafted piece of furniture from home and not a blasting gun that looks like it came from a plumbers work shop of pipe works.

    • avatarfrank gioia says:

      JOHN I WOULD LOVE TO PURCHASE THE PRODUCT FROM HENRY AND PATRONIZE U.S. MANUFACTURERS AND IN FACT I AM WILLING TO PAY MORE TO DO SO BUT SOMETIMES THE COST IS JUST TOO STEEP!! WE ARE TALKING 1000$ MORE . IT IS A PERSONAL DECESION .I FIND THAT TOO STEEP.

      • avatarJohn says:

        The price of guns and ammo are low in cost compared to responsibility. 500 dollars is a lot of money to many. Would you handle 5,000 dollars different. Put it somewhere no one can get to it or even find it. The same is with guns. Take better care of your value be ause there is added respect to the responsibility. It is easy to replace a 280.00 dollar gun than a 2,800 gun. Keep guns away like money from those who do not know the value, respect and responsibility that goes with it. If you want a 1860 Henry and or a Volcanic buy the replicias. They look the same cost a lot less, no one gets hurt. Most likely be fired as much. Hang on the wall, looks nice. The wallet is better and you have what it will become. A nice picture to hang. Smith and Wesson invented the lever action. Henry improved it, Winchester got the glory because he had the money. Just some thoughts on price and history.

        • avatarfrank gioia says:

          JOHN I HATE TO BE CRITICAL BUT YOUR GRAMMAR IS TERRIBLE .I AM NOT EVEN SURE OF THE POINT YOU WERE TRYING TO MAKE BUT I WILL TAKE A STAB AT IT.IF I PURCHASE A WEAPON JUST TO DISPLAY OR TO USE OF COURSE I WOULD BE RESPONSIBLE WITH IT BUT THAT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH WHAT WE ARE TALKING ABOUT! IT IS UP TO EACH INDIVIDUAL TO DECIDE WHAT PRICE HE IS COMFORTABLE PAYING BASED ON OTHER FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES HE HAS IN HIS LIFE! NOTHING MORE NOTHING LESS.

        • avatarJohn says:

          You are right it is up to the individual. I was not talking about you I was referring in general terms. The price is steep for the 1860 and over the top. I own a golden boy and personalized. The price was reasonable but not Walmart super price, ha ha humor. Values of guns can change either up or down. I would wait to see what happens. Then again 2,300 could be a bargin if they made limited and numbered editions. I would like to see them make a stainless 22 LR and call it the Henry Silver Eagle. But that like trying to see the price drop on the 1860.

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  16. avatarRyan says:

    you know, I have an Italian repro 1860 henry and I have been wanting an American made 1860 Henry for a long time. That being said I wanted that rifle to be competitive with the imports. I feel that asking twice as much as the Italian made rifles has doomed this rifle’s success. This is of course before I have handled one or shot one. It may be that these are fabulous rifles but to me, a rifle needs to be for more than just a showpiece or a show piece. For years the Civil War reenacting community, to which I belong, has been denied economical and historically accurate retreaters. We do crave them and have given an outlet for manufactures of these firearms for years as they have been released by the manufacturers. It is almost insulting that the company has first ignored us then insulted us offering it at a price that is out of reach for so many reenactors that will buy the imports instead of the American made one.

  17. avatarJohn says:

    Henry USA quality, made in the USA in New Jersey. Located not far from the Statue of Liberty. Made in America by Americans just like the first Henry’s made in New Haven. Cost more, it should because USA made is not cheep. For those who do reinactments, I salute you for doing that. Now on the other side of things. Design changes were made from the original after the civil war because the barrel gets to hot to hold. That is why you shoot with gloves. Wood was placed on the forearm to prevent burning your hand. You have to adjust your forearm position on every shot because the spring moves down below the barrel where the bullets move. They did have issues with double fires during the civil war. Price should not be an issue. Where it’s made and how it’s made is important for patrotic history. Don’t settle for something less. If you want something that good get it.
    Smith & Wesson made the original repeating action that Henry improved on. It will be interesting to see the newest Henry when it is released.

  18. avatarJohanne says:

    You people need to realize this company is not the same firm that produced the original 1860 rifle. They are just using the Henry name, they are NOT the original company. Just like Springfield Armory has nothing to do with the company that produced the 1903 Springfield rifle among others. They just took the name to sell more firearms.

    • avatarfrank gioia says:

      I AGREE WITH JOHANNE.SOME PEOPLE SEEM TO THINK THAT IF YOU DO NOT BUY AN AMERICAN MADE PRODUCT YOUR LESS PATRIOTIC! WHEN I WANT TO PURCHASE A PRODUCT I WILL,MOST OF THE TIME,TRY TO BUY AMERICAN BUT I AM NO FOOL.WHEN I FIRST ENTERED ON THIS BLOG ABOUT THREE WEEKS AGO I MENTIONED THAT IT WAS GREAT THE COMPANY FINALLY DID SOMETHING THAT THEY SHOULD OF DONE WHEN THEY TOOK OVER THE COMPANY! MAKE THE ORIGINAL HENRY! I ALSO SAID I WAS WILLING TO PAY MORE THAN UBERTI WAS CHARGING FOR THEIR EXCELLENT REPRODUCTION!! BUT I WAS NOT GOING TO PAY ALMOST TWICE AS MUCH!!! OTHER PEOPLE MAY DIFFER AND THAT’S FINE BUT LET’S NOT GO DOWN THIS (WHO IS MORE PATRIOTIC ROAD)!!!

  19. avatarJohn says:

    Not the original is true. Winchester went out of business 2008. They are made in China, Portugal, and owned by a Belgin European company. Smith and Wesson was the designer of the lever action. Winchester never made anything except for shirts. The real issue is that the today’s Henry is 100% made USA and a privately owned company not a corporation. Oliver Winchester, when the 1860 Henry was a good selling rifle, placed his name on it. Winchester was an investor. He was not an inventor. The S&W lever action was called the Volcanic. The Volcanic did not sell, problems with exploding rounds in the loader and double rounds going off. Winchester bought out S&W then called The New Haven Arms Co. Today’s Henry is top quality USA. Design and improvements 22 cal. The new Henry’s will in time become in time historical quality as the originals.

  20. avatarRyan says:

    Over the weekend I got to get my hands on a couple of these rifles. Everyone was very excited to finally be able to se these new rifles. As we pulled them out of the box the front sight fell off one. No biggies it would still technically function right and things can happen, I mean maybe it was Friday and the sight guy had a date or something. We unboxed another one and discovered that the lever would not stay in the up position because on that one the action was so sloppy. Hmmmm. Out of ten rifles 5 had really serious issues. That is a 50 percent failure rate. One would not cycle because the bolt would not move to the rear completely. The actions on the ones that did work were very “clunky”. They are much heavier that than the Uberti and many of the parts are simply bigger such as the lever catch that is to the rear of the lever. It is so big that it is actual hard to manipulate at times. This is an issue on the rifles that swing on their own because you must engage the catch to keep from accidentally cycling a round. At this point I would not buy one due to the poor quality and the over inflated price. Out of 40 guys that got to actually look at them and handle them and see what problems they actually had not one said they would buy one. Unless this rifle becomes more competitive in quality and price I am afraid the Italians will continue to dominate the market.

  21. avatartanstaafl says:

    I want one bad, but not $2300.00 bad.

  22. avatarEd says:

    Is TTAG making a tongue in cheek comment by saying the new Henry is “Cheap at half the price?” If you think something is a real bargain it might be “cheap at TWICE the price.”

  23. avatarfrank says:

    does anyone have any information on how well these rifles are selling?

  24. avatarDavid Hubbard says:

    I bought one of the HENRY .22 Lever guns when they first came out. I had to crown the barrel and in fact have the barrel straightened before it would hit a target. It jammed consistently. Last year, a friend had one of the Big .44 Rifles. It quit working and we took it apart to try to fix it. We could not find the problem but noticed that the internal parts were very rough. We found another rifle to take apart and compare and it was totally different in the mechanism. We found a third rifle and it was evn different than the first two. Playing on the original HENRY REPEATING ARMS COMPANY name is a bit tricky. People need to understand for certain that the gun is similar only in model type- not name. I have been shooting Italian 1860 Henrys for many years. I have had no more problem with them as I would an 1873 WINCHESTER ( Real One). I have one converted to .44 COLT from 44-40 that I really like and I can use the same cartridge as my Italian 1872 Open Tops.
    After a few years of production and you get the quirks out of the rifle and the price comes down- I would like to have one just for the quirky name. I would first have to be assured that parts will be interchangeable. I don’t need any one of a kind rifles.

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  26. I own two Golden Boys and find them to be superb rifles without flaw. I also own an Umberti Win 73/44-40 and it is fine looking rifle that functions flawlessly. I find the 73 to also be a bargin for $1300, the big issue is the 73 is a foreign reproduction and the Henry’s are all USA. The Henry 1860 also represents a very critical point in both politics and manufacturing of guns. Our history should be crowned royal with such presentations as the Henry 1860 as often as an American manufacture can find the where-with-all to get it done. So, Mr. Henry folks, good job.

    Those wanting to whipper about the hot barrel, well………………..that’s the way the original wasbuilt. I’m sure you could ask Henry to send you an old sock for your hand if that is your only concern. It wouldn’t be an 1860 if Henry stuck a broom stick on the forearm for you,…….would it?

    On the price, I’ve always believed you pretty much get what you pay for. Now, check out the warranty on an Umberti and deal with sending something back to Italy and see how you like that. The Henry’s I have came with an American and an American company standing behind them.

    One more thing, the price often seperates the boys from the girls on lots of stuff, in my view there in is the logic telling us why we don’t all own yachts. Some of us just have to be happy with a Pero swamp boat. Let me hasten to say I once owned a Pero. I’ll order my New Henry 1860 at $2300 and figure I got a bargin.

    • avatarfrank says:

      no you did not get a bargain you bought a rifle.overpriced in my opinion but it is your money,you spend it as you wish . I am willing to pay more for American made but not double the price! good luck with your henry.

      • avatarJohn says:

        Gun price? Oh my, it’s a wonderful price and a bargan price. In general prices for all guns should go up. Maybe 5 times in value of today’s price. Why? First it will HELP keep those who should not have a gun away. 2nd if you want a gun you will pay the price. 3rd those with lots and lots of dust collecting, space taking, rusting guns can trade in sell up or even get $$$ for better quality. We do have a right to bear arms, but we do not have the right to the price to pay to bear the guns. Be delighted with the price. Time alone will drive gun prices up let alone the mad dog politics.

        • avatarfrank says:

          your first two statements are so ignorant they do not even deserve a reply but I will say this ,the only thing that increasing the price of firearms 5 times will do will prevent law abiding citizens from being able to afford them for protection! the bad guys are always going to be able to acquire weapons most of the time illegaly! by the way we do not have a right to purchase a product at a price we want to pay,the market usually determines that.that is why we have competition! there are many politicians who do want to take away our 2nd amendment rights

  27. Frank, In all due respect, you should let a grammar teacher to read your next blip on the computer before you point the finger of ” stupid “. I certainly appreciate your point of view on the issue without condemnation of your free will to speak. I’m hope full you will give me the same consideration and all the rest of us that ordered our 1860 Henry, a real Henry, yesterday at $2300.

    I would guess our single largest gap in assessment probably rest with the “system of things, how money works” For me I’m strictly a free enterprise person. Henry or Frank can sell their stuff for any price they want. Frank, me and you can choose to play or pass, our decision falls far short of making either of us ignorant. Being a machinist once upon a time I can fully appreciate the skills as well as the risk Henry took in the production of the 1860. I’m very impressed that this family didn’t board up the doors for a few pieces of silver. Remember, Colt was one of the early runners to the ocean in 1964. It’s choices as free will Americans Frank, nothing more and nothing less.

    Most gun outlets in my area are charging about $15 for a box of 50 17 cal. super mags…………………. I’m offering $25 Frank. Two reasons, nobody has them, I want them, without the two box limit, so……………….I’ll pay for them. Pretty simple thinking, pay for what you get in relation to the quality and the supply.

    God’s Speed, Keep your Henry at your side. Christ is not the only thing coming like a thief in the night. Jefferson told us the free citizens single greatest threat he will ever face is his own government. Things are looking a bit strange if you ask me when a government can pick out what you don’t want and demand that you buy it or else. So, here is my policy: Let’s figure out what binds us together and pee-pee on everything else. [hand shake works for me]

    TW

    • avatarfrank says:

      first of all my grammar is fine yours is not.your first sentence is incorrect.(you should let a grammar teacher to read) second of all i did not call the gentleman stupid ,i used the word ignorant.there is a difference! if you had read my statement more carefully you would have noted that i said producers can sell their products at any price they wish.but we are not forced to buy! oh by the way i have a henry golden boy.his comment that the rifle should be 5 times what it costs so the bad guys can not afford one was an ignorant comment! as far as jefferson’s comment regarding goverment tyranny; i have a B.S.in american history from brooklyn college 1973.by the way i am well aware that the current president has a fascistic mind set! you and I DO NOT DISAGREE.you are just trying to hard to find something to disagree on.! have a good day.

  28. Frank, I’ll not belabor the point any further, especially on the Henry web sight. I see where you are coming from, a different world from mine. In addition, I’m not familiar with Brooklyn College nor the value of a BS Degree from said college. I have a friend that graduated from an eastern college, don’t remember which one. My problem, I never could figure out the value in a degree centered on cowboy rope tricks and bird whistling. Any way he has a job a the local corner gas stop. I doubt it is a significant issue, but he too thinks Henry is too high on the 1860.

    Frank, let me bid you farewell and high boots’

    TW

  29. avatarJames Kelly says:

    Original Henry rifles, and early Winchesters, could fire out of battery for two reasons.
    First, it was possible for the hammer to fall before the lever had completely closed the action.
    Second, if the rifle got dirty or rusted, the firing pin could protrude & result in a slam-fire if one was in a hurry.
    Winchester fixed both of these problems, the second by having a positive firing pin retractor.
    So does this new Henry have these two fixes, or is it designed EXACTLY like the original?

    The whole idea of a practical repeating rifle was a new thing in 1860. One cannot blame them for missing a couple of possible malfunctions in their design. But on new made guns?

  30. avatarTom Schatz says:

    I have been facinated by the Henry all my life. I never bit the bullit to pay the $1k to $1400 for a out of country replica. I could not understand why the Henry Rifle Company didn’t make all their first rifles to look and function like the original Henry’s? But now they have, with the Original Henry madel. The exception is that they put Very Nice Wood on their replica vs the plain wood on the Uberti. The photos Inhave seen show “Early Ruger Number 1 quality wood with beautiful figure. Firearms with that kind of wood are not cheep. I hope I can come up with the money to buy one of these. At 63 this would be a lifelong dream fulfilled for me.

  31. avatarWoodrow1 says:

    Yes you can get Italian gun cheaper but that is all you will have. Friend got one and didn’t shoot at all due to light rifling. We re- rifled and then it was pretty good.
    But then, who wants to do all that work after paying over 1200.00 for gun.

    • avatarhancock says:

      so your friend received a subpar rifle from an italian manufacturer so according to your logic they are all subpar . so i am guessing that you have statistics that show no one who ever recieved a rifle from henry arms received a subpar product.

  32. avatarRoland says:

    Sound like cackling women. The weapons nostalgic .But its not like my 72 Cutlass convertible. I don’t like their advertising sounds like an infomercial like all them China knives. I Damn sure don’t want no more George Foreman grills.American is good like my Cutlass. But so is my AK & AR. Best thing about American is we can say write whatever we want and we do all have a opinion. And that was not made in America it was breed here! :-)

  33. avatarRoland says:

    Sound like cackling women. The weapons nostalgic .But its not like my 72 Cutlass convertible. I don’t like their advertising sounds like an infomercial like all them China knives. I Damn sure don’t want no more George Foreman grills.American is good like my Cutlass. But so is my AK & AR. Best thing about American is we can say write whatever we want and we do all have a opinion and that was not made in America it was breed here! :-)

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