A Few Thoughts on Cody Wilson’s Plastic Fantastic Pistol

 Liberator pistol

Liberal politicians and their equally-liberal media fanboys are aghast at the concept of a homemade plastic firearm. They want to purge the plans from the internet (yeah, good luck with that), require background checks to purchase 3-D printers and probably give Cody Wilson a lobotomy so he can’t do any more work on it. But there’s one thing that all the media and politicians with their panties twisted over this just don’t seem understand: The Liberator is just a hunk of plastic. Get over it . . .

Their main points of contention revolve around its plastic composition. They have their collective asses in a collective uproar because an average citizen (with a multi-thousand dollar printer) could actually make one of these things all by themselves, and it can’t be detected by airport and other security screening. This is true. However, there’s no law that says a citizen can’t make his or her own firearms for their own personal use. In fact, you can download plans from the internet for making anything from a zip gun using a couple of pieces of pipe to CNC specs for machining the components for custom-built firearms.

For some reason, though, no one seems to worry about those, even though they could be much more deadly than a plastic gun that fires a single .38 caliber round with the help of a nail. If anything, they should welcome the concept. After all, aren’t one-shot wonders the ultimate extension of the mag-cap-limit crowd? And as far as someone mass-producing Liberators and selling them on street corners, there are already laws covering that on the books. They already apply to the Liberator just as they do to any other home-built firearm.

“But”, they whine, “the pieces and parts of the Liberator can make it through an airport or other security screening station undetected.” So what? So can a plastic dagger, a plastic garrote, plastic knitting needles, or a plastic billy club, any of which can be used to cause mayhem as is. The Liberator can’t.

Without ammunition, which any security screening system should be able to detect easily, its usefulness as a weapon is limited to using it as a club. If the TSA is letting live ammo get on planes, they’ve got much bigger problems than a few plastic guns. And I’m sure there are better objects to be found on the average jetliner if you’re looking for something with which to bludgeon the idiot who keeps bumping the back of your seat.

So why are politicians and other liberals getting so bent out of shape over this? It’s not the Liberator itself. It’s what it symbolizes – a way for people to regain some of their Second Amendment rights the Nanny Ninnies have taken away over the years – or hope to in the near future. They can’t handle the idea of John and Jane Q. Public regaining any lost ground. And they want to stop it, even if it means trampling on the First and Fourth Amendments in the process.

comments

  1. avatar Michael B. says:

    Cody hand-fired it, concern troll. You might know that if you actually took five seconds to research a topic.

    BTW, try not to rely on so many fallacies next time.

  2. avatar Michael B. says:

    WTF happened to the comments?

    1. avatar Frank Williams says:

      There was a problem with the post crashing some browsers, due to a screw-up by a brain dead poster. We had to re-do it and unfortunately the comments were lost in the process. Mea culpa.

  3. avatar DBPolice says:

    There is such a thing as polymer cartridges. Nylon bullets are quite effective at short range. Would one 380ACP powder load and one small pistol primer get through?

  4. avatar Theron Trowbridge says:

    Silly rabbit politicians – 3D printers can’t be regulated. They can slap restrictions on the big units like what the Liberator was printed on, but the DIY models are open source machines that can be built with everyday hardware for less than $500. They aren’t as good as the unit the Liberator was made with yet, but they are getting better all the time. Unless they want to implement background checks on purchases of threaded rod, hex nuts, and plywood, there is simply no way to control who has one.

  5. avatar Jeffer says:

    When were the Liberator 3D files first shared? Was it May 6? or May 7? So it’s been about a week? The media shrieked like society had just toppled off a precipice and into a bottomless pit of worldwide bloodshed and chaos . . . criminals and anarchists churning out plastic pistols by the thousands, assassins bypassing security at every level . . . So what’s the death toll now? I think it’s probably zero, because I’m pretty sure that if ONE person had been shot with a Liberator then the media would have gone ballistic. (So to speak.) Yeh. One week of worldwide access to a high-tech zip gun and zero casualties. Go figure.

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