Saying Jews aren’t into hunting is like saying Sarai Givaty isn’t into deep-fried mozzarella sticks. Ah, but does the Torah forbid it (hunting, not deep-friend mozzarella sticks)? What do I look like, a rabbi? Suffice it to say, if there is a hell Dan’s headed there. Our main man bagged a nine-point buck earlier today. Though he may be damned by both PETA and members of The Tribe, Dan seems as pleased as punch. Although not so pleased with the subsequent butchering. All of which Nick caught on camera. With this milestone achieved, we should have the TTAG TV pilot wrapped-up by the SHOT show in mid-January. Meanwhile, I found this advice for Dan at chabad.org: “Whether because there is an actual prohibition involved, or because it runs contrary to the morals and values taught by the Torah, hunting is not a good sport for a nice Jewish boy or girl. Try basketball.” Dan. Basketball. Now that’s funny!

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27 Responses to TTAG TV Show: Dan Bags a Buck

  1. Well done.

    The deer, not the article. Article sucked. If you’re writing for a broad audience, stop with the esoteric references to your own culture.

    But really, nice catch.

  2. Congratulations Dan! Did Nick get a picture of you in the classic pose position with your boot on the deer’s neck like those old British hunter photos taken in Africa?

    Those urban domesticated, often ignorant and sometimes arrogant rabbi sheeple need to speak and give their dumb advice much less, and to hunt, fish, and shoot more. The rabbis of Germany in the 1930s told Jews to ignore the Nazis as they would go surely away. Obviously that did not happen. If any Jews deserve hell it is those whose egos inspired them into positions of leadership and then failed their people. American Jewish men can learn much about life and living like men from our pro-gun and pro-hunting Christian brothers.

    • The problem with hunting in Jewish tradition is that the meat isn’t kosher. It needs to be slaughtered in a very specific way. This isn’t a case of modern urban rabbis inventing some new stringency. This is basic Jewish law dating back 2000 years.

      • Actually the tradition probably goes back a bit further in time. I’m well aware that the modern urban rabbis didn’t invent some new kosher-food policy. Ideally, Jews should probably practice the vegan diet as followed in the Garden of Eden teachings but that’s another topic and story. I sometimes wonder where the source of the traditions come from; are they actually from God or some human guys in positions of religious leadership ie sages and rabbis? Books and specialized study, and academic debate are fine. However, too much emphasis on them and living secluded, and avoiding other subjects and other people does not make for great leaders to give advice.

  3. well deer are coven hoofed but I think they are considered “ritualy pure”, don’t quote me on that but I know pigs are a no go, but varmints and birds are “kosher”

    • Most varmints aren’t kosher (don’t chew cud and have cloven hooves). Birds are an interesting case; it basically comes down to whether they have a tradition of being kosher.

      Dan should have this deer processed and donated to the local homeless shelter.

        • You’re not going to make any (at least a little) venison jerky to take home or enjoy a well-deserved venison burger with a good brew? That is sinful. The deer would want you to do it. BTW, what was that you wrote about RF mounting some new rack? Is she another Israeli model?

  4. Kudos to you Dan.

    Field dressing to me is always the relative low point of the entire hunting equation. But, it is the most important as far as ensuring the meat is pristine and fit for eating. Field dressing a javelina is the ultimate test of careful field dressing. Thankfully when I took mine I had my experienced uncle along to make sure that stinky pig was half-assed fit to eat. Copious amounts of beer and barbecue sauce helped too.

  5. OY VEY, a jew has hunted. Let’s open the bowels of hell…..NOT. Dan you bagged your Buck, don’t let ANYONE try to sour that accomplishment. Congrats. we know the rifle, what was your ammo and range on the shot?

  6. Well done, sir.

    More people should hunt. Whitetail are over-running the country, and people should know from whence their food comes.

    • The only problem with that is that I don’t generally eat venison. I don’t dislike it, it’s just not part of my regular diet. So killing a whitetail to see where my food comes from wouldn’t really be on point.

      On the other hand, ranchers get mad when you shoot at their cattle, and have you ever seen what a .308 does to a potato? Not a terribly effective way of harvesting them.

      • My edit button disappeared, sorry.

        I’m totally cross-posting this, but I need some advice. I’m gonna try and snag one of those super-deal Remington 700’s from Dick’s on Black Friday. My intention was to go after a .308, but this post made me think about a .243 Winchester. I don’t have a particular purpose in mind for it beyond the range at this point, but if I was to hunt, it would most likely be for Florida/Georgia whitetail, or possibly hogs. Assuming both are available, any recommendations either way?

        • .308 Matt. The .243 is a great round, it’s basically a necked down .308, but it’s a bit light for an all around game rifle. There’s a wider slection of factory loads for the .308 as well.

          Just my opinion. not trying to start another caliber war.

        • I am to the .243 WIN what Nick is to the .300 BLK.

          .243 is more expensive (but not much) with a lot of variety in loads. I like it because its a flat shooting, wind resistant bullet that I can shoot all day long. If you have kiddos and you want to have them shoot a viable caliber for hunting, .243 is a great choice. I’d have no problem shooting pigs, whitetail, and axis with a .243.

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