There’s a little bit more to hunting than just finding a deer and shooting it. In order to get the best tasting meat you need to field dress that sucker ASAP, which means removing all the messy bits from the inside. You know, the ones that contain the bacteria and foul smelling stuff that makes for stinky and unhealthy meat. Following Dan’s kill, I helped Tyler field dress the buck in anticipation of its pending donation and we got it on film, complete with a play by play overview from the sawsall surgeon himself. Naturally, if you’re not a fan of blood and guts this might not be the film for you.

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25 Responses to [NSFW] Field Dressing a Deer with Tyler Kee

  1. Are you guys donating it to PETA(people eating tasty animals)?? Glad you guys are donating it to needy families!!
    Wish more people would do this!!
    OMG!! Texas Sawzall Massacre!!! Someone call the SPCA, call PETA, call someone!!(running around waving arms in air and screaming like a little bitch)!!! Sarcasm Off.
    Thank again for helping out those less fortunate than most of us are!!

  2. Yummy, watched that while eating my lunch. Looks a lot easier than it was to clean my moose! Makes me want to go on a hunt soon.

  3. I too am sitting here watching this while eating my lunch. A co-worker almost hurled there’s when they saw it lol

    Quick question.
    Removal of scent glands, do you guys do it first or after? I know many say use a separate knife, and do it first.

    And thank you for donating to less fortunate!

    • I do it first, and then wash the knife.
      They don’t actually taint the meat, they just smell terrible and will get that smell all over whatever they touch.

  4. Great informative video. Too bad you aren’t butchering it yourselves, I’d love a TTAG guide to butchering a deer. But donating the carcass to needy families is a very worthwhile cause in itself so good for you guys. Good first buck too, Dan. Congrats.

  5. I always tie off the intestines at the very first. Any reason you guys don’t. Those little “butt out” tools work.

  6. So you have your BSI but you failed by not observing scene safety!

    I have never seen or done this before but I have to admit it was amusing at parts. I dont find it at all disturbing, Ive been in an OR for human organ procurments (harvest).

    I chuckled a little bit when you first laid it out and put the front legs behind the antlers and then just died when Nick lifted up the back legs. No perverted thoughts at all, it just looked hilarious.

    Great video. I always wondered about how this is done. One day Ill try hunting.

  7. By the way, watching a recipricating saw used on a human sternum is ummm odd at first. Especially when the battery dies and the techs forgot to bring a backup.

  8. To continue the EMS comments: When using a Sawzall make sure you have cut ALL the way through the object (impaled fence post in a drunk driver, hypothetically) before releasing the saw trigger. Otherwise the object might “shudder” disturbing vital organs. Hypothetically.

  9. Nice job, this the the “work” part of hunting. Along with the drag when you shoot something that dies at the bottom of a ravine where the 4 wheeler won’t go.

    The process is half technique, half skill and half art. Each time you will improve.

    There are tricks that you’ll get over time. Tools that work well and some that don’t.

    I’ve got it down to about 8 minutes. My hunting partner is a surgeon, his are done in under 5.

    Keep hunting!

  10. Watched this with the kids today on the big screen. Great video, glad to see you guys take your time and work safely even under the pressure to keep things moving that you feel with a camera pointed at you.

  11. Great job guys. Thanks for this. For those that don’t have sawzalls out in the woods, any tricks to getting that pelvis bone split without piercing the plumbing?

  12. A Sawzall is a little much to pack for a day field, if you don’t have a handy ATV. But a knife made from a Sawzall blade makes a great tool for splitting the pelvis.

  13. As someone who managed to spend many years in VT without hunting, can I just say, super informative. Thank you very much for posting these two videos, as hunting may be something I want to do in the future. One question: when you are separating the meat from either side of the spine, is there a danger of puncturing the spine itself and introducing any prion-related diseases to your meat? In some parts of the Northeast we have issues with wasting diseases in deer, so I am wondering about how one safely avoids contact with spinal tissue.

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