Federal Launches American Eagle branded 300 AAC Blackout Ammo

Someone just tipped me off to the fact that Federal (the guys that make American Eagle and ammunition for the US Government) are now making 300 AAC Blackout ammunition. This dovetails nicely with that whole search for a quieter round for special forces thing, since this makes the probability of a Lake City run of 300 BLK much more probable. Since Federal / ATK runs Lake City and everything. Lake City being the primary U.S. Government ammunition factory. Good news galore for 300 BLK lovers, since the more manufacturers there are the cheaper and more prevalent the ammunition will be.

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About Nick Leghorn

Nick Leghorn is a gun nerd living and working in San Antonio, Texas. In his free time, he's a competition shooter (USPSA, 3-gun and NRA High Power), aspiring pilot, and enjoys mixing statistics and science with firearms. Now on sale: Getting Started with Firearms by yours truly!

23 Responses to Federal Launches American Eagle branded 300 AAC Blackout Ammo

  1. avatarCarlosT says:

    What’s 300 BLK going for these days?

  2. avatarg says:

    300 BLK rounds cost what, 50 cents to $1 a bullet still? Yeah, having it dip below that 50 cent range would be nice… then again, I don’t any rifles that shoot it. Yet… cheaper ammo prices never hurt the motivation to look into getting one, though.

  3. avatarOHgunner says:

    When I have the funds for an SBR and a suppressor, 300blk is at the top of my list. Hopefully by then it’ll be cheap and plentiful

  4. avatarChase says:

    Nick is so entrenched in this stupid round, he can’t read for crap.

    They are looking for subsonic ammo for 5.56, 7.62, and .338. Not a new caliber.

    • avatarOHgunner says:

      Maybe the military is so entrenched in their stupid rounds that they refuse to look at a better caliber.

      • avatarCarlosT says:

        Especially since converting their M4s to 300 BLK would be a fairly simple process, and then they’d have a very good platform for subsonic and supersonic cartridges with minimal fuss.

      • avatarAPBTFan says:

        The Whisper/Blackout was engineered first and fore most for subsonic suppressor use. Beyond that there are much better choices. If there is any round that shows true potential to replace the 5.56 it’s the 6.5 Grendel.

        • avatarpat says:

          Especially at distance. 6.5 Grenel would do what 5.56 and 7.62 can do (and in some ways better) while giving up little of the advantages of each.

        • avatarWLCE says:

          I think 300 black out would be a very good replacement for the 5.56, especially when it comes to suppressed weapons and PDWs.

          That doesnt discount the round’s effectiveness at the 3-400 meter range. TTAG posted a 300 black out video with Travis Haley that pretty much demonstrated how versatile this round is and the superior energies it offers over the 5.56 while changing very little…to include accuracy.

          The 6.5 grendel is a awesome performing cartridge, and theoretically has a potential to replace 5.56 AND 7.62 with a universal cartridge, well have to see in the near future how each one takes off.

  5. avatarAgitator says:

    No matter who makes it, no matter what platforms it’s available in, no matter how cool it’s name sounds…

    This round still sucks, and I don’t understand TTAG’s obsession with it.

    • Can you define “sucks”?

      Because for me, it works great for what I need. Kills deer dead, gives me some extra area in competitions to break the line, and switches to subsonic without changing a thing. In other words, perfect for my purposes.

    • avatarNotDumb says:

      Agitator-What exactly sucks about it? It sounds like you need to read a book before putting on your clown shoes. My guess is you’re a fanboy upset that you can’t buy a 300BLK for $200, so obviously it’s useless. Except for the fact it’s superior in everyway as a combat effective round. Not to mention its an awesome hunting round.

      • avatarAgitator says:

        The advantage the 300BLK offers over other AR15-compatible chamberings is the ability to use a stock 5.56mm bolt and magazines. Compared to the 6.8, or 6.5, it offers less performance at a comparable price per round.

        So tell me, it’s superior in every way to, what exactly? 5.56? Not going to get an argument here, but pretending that it’s the ballistic equivalent of a laser gun makes you sound like the “fanboy.”

        And for the record, I don’t know what your $200 comment is all about, but no, I wouldn’t buy a 300BLK upper even for that much. Except to turn around and sell it to you.

    • avatarGyufygy says:

      It’s a compromise round that fits a lot of roles and requirements decently, roles and requirements that were previously considered completely incompatible. It can also fill all of them with the same platform, a platform that only requires a barrel change on one of the most prevalent rifles in the US. Rather than having to switch rifles, you switch magazines. That’s the neat part about it.

      I don’t use the round, and I have no intention of getting a rifle that does any time soon, but that multi-role capability is still an impressive feat.

    • avatarRoss says:

      While the supersonic variation is weaker than several AR-15 alternatives, it’s performance is more than adequate for deer and hog hunting. As is the subsonic, which has similar projectile weight and muzzle velocity as a .45 ACP but with the aerodynamics to make it travel accurately well past 200 yards (as far as I’ve tried to shoot it, and I tend to limit myself to hunting shots inside of 75 yards, so the negligible drop works out nicely). Even better: when suppressed, it’s about as noisy as the AR action cycling, which means I can safely leave the amplifying earmuffs and foamies at home when I go hunting these days.

      I also have an AR in 6.5 grendel, which is a fine long-range caliber. I’m learning to shoot out to 600 yards with that one. But 6.5g is optimized for longer barrels and even though I can move my .30 suppressor over to the 6.5g, the package is much larger/heavier since there’s little point in a <16" grendel barrel (mine is a heavy 24").

      As for 5.56, it's a fine plinking and competition round, but I can't legally use it for game up here in Washington. 6.8 is a fine hunting round, but I went for the grendel first and the 6.8 doesn't do anything that 7.62×51 or 6.5g can't exceed, so it probably won't make it into my gun safe.

  6. avatarLance says:

    Well like every favorite flavor of the year .300 will be made for many rich men who want suppressed ARs Cheap maker would make money selling bulk ammo in this caliber.

    I prefer .223 since if you dont have a suppressor it aint worth it.

  7. avatarSouthernmutt says:

    Yes, yes. I’m also very tired of hearing about the .300 BO, but then again, I’m biased towards the 6.8SPC (Which Federal is also tooling up for, to the beat of 150M rounds). This won’t deter me from frequenting these boards though. I just can’t make the leap into the BO, the G is a whole another story though. Sorry Rsilvers, but I don’t need another lesson in funny number. I wonder how much Mr. Haly got paid for his endorsement?

  8. avatarRsilvers says:

    Brian,

    Travis Haley was not paid. He was personally excited about 300 AAC Blackout enough to have made the video without anyone asking him to.

  9. avatarMike in NC says:

    Glad to see Federal tooling up for 300 BLK. Right now, brass-cased target rounds are in the 55 to 60 cent range and increased production should push this down some more.

    The link posted is a government supplier and these rounds (220 gr) are most likely destined for law enforcement use. The heavy subsonic 300 BLK rounds are better suited to many LE uses than other alternate AR rounds (with the obvious exception of snipers).

    As for explaining the 300 BLK hatred, I’ll have to defer to TTAG’s resident psychologist (if there is one) for an opinion.

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