Everything You Wanted to Know About Silencers but Were Afraid to Ask

Do you shoot your can wet or dry? Wait, don’t answer that. This is a family gun blog. Do you know what a Nielsen device is? Or why your gun may need one. Or more important, why you don’t want to use one on your rifle? Neither did we. But reader fireman1291 sure does and shares those tidbits and more in his Silencers 101 vid. He seems to have more money invested in NFA items than most people put into their cars. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Focus is a bit of an issue, but if you can get past that, there’s some good info here. Enjoy.

7 Responses to Everything You Wanted to Know About Silencers but Were Afraid to Ask

  1. avatarJohn Arizona says:

    Verry informitave, BUT PLEASE use a tripod when filming, bouncing and fast paning, makes it hard to watch.
    thanks;

  2. avatarLevi B says:

    I think the main thing he needs is to set his camera to focus on the closest thing in view rather than the farthest!

  3. avatarDonS says:

    At about 4:30, he suggests that it’s a bad idea to pre-charge an aluminum core suppressor with water because “water and aluminum don’t mix well … and you’re going to oxidize” the core.

    Isn’t that one of the great reasons why aluminum is so corrosion-resistant? It [nearly] instantly oxidizes on the surface, but that extremely thin, hard Al2O3 film prevents further oxidation.

    The oxygen in the atmosphere should already provide that protective layer – water should have no further effect. (Unless, perhaps, the water’s pH was well off of “neutral”).

    • avatarscm says:

      That was my understanding as well. One the many reasons they make airplanes out of the stuff, too.

    • avatarHeath R says:

      As I understand it, that would be the case under normal circumstances. however corrosion is fairly screwy and a lot of factors effect it, including standing water. long story short, at the edge of the water there is an oxygen content drop. this change in concentration creates a mini battery using the aluminum, that thickens the oxide layer. As someone who works with aluminum I can tell you that letting water dry on parts will leave behind noticeable residue (which may or may not be from minerals in the water).

  4. avatarSomenfa Owner says:

    I believe the primary concern for corrosion from water would be if tap water were used or water from some other source that contains chlorine … chlorine really hates aluminum.

    I have a suppressor with aluminum components I run wet fearlessly using wire pulling gel. The added advantage to wire pulling gel is it mostly stays where you put it.

  5. avatarJoshua says:

    I’ve subscribed to Fireman1291 for a while. Seems like he has put up with a lot of Youtube saftey trolls and naysayers and turned the tables to make it educational.

    Not to mention he has great taste in two wheeled vehicles as well.

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