As a high testosterone male I’m not very good at multi-tasking (allegedly). And I’m pretty damn competitive and not a little bit aggressive. A bullseye target is good but a little too . . . intellectual. Let me put it this way: I never hit a golf ball so far or so accurately as I did when the guy in the golf cart shark cage drove onto the driving range. When it comes to shooting I like “singing steel” (as Nick so eloquently put it in his review of the McMillan Tactical Hunter). So the idea of taking shots at a 3-D self-healing prairie dogs pushes all kinds of buttons for me. I mean just look at the snooty little bastard. If Do-All Outdoors could make a system that has the dogs popping-up from underground like Ye Olde Whack-A-Mole, oh man . . .

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17 Responses to New From Do All Outdoors: Self-Healing 3-D Prairie Dog Target

  1. I takes a back seat to a steel silhouette, but then what doesn’t?
    as for the whack a mole, easily solved with pneumatics

  2. “I have a confession to make. I’m a guy. I may not be good at multi-tasking, but (because?) I have lots ‘o testosterone in my bloodstream…”

    — Being the publisher and primary writer for TTAG means that you are wearing more diverse responsibility-hats and multi-tasking more than 99% of the female population.

    Today, on CNN the pro-feemimizst mass media ran yet another article questioning if men are necessary since one-day human females (like the snakes they gave examples of) will self-procreate. blah blah blah. I’m not going to get into how fathers are ultimately more important for kids to have or the countless other ways I could respond. Within twenty years, it is expected the artificial womb will be created and those cute robotic seex dolls from Japan will have been perfected. Therefore the question will then turn to asking if women are necessary.

  3. I like the self-healing targets that roll around on the ground when you hit them. A little more challenging for pistol shooters. This groundhog look too big for plinking with a .22 rifle, even at 100 yards. I think steel is more satisfying too–it gives you that nice aural feedback when you score, especially at extended distances for your selected firearm.

  4. No we need them to dance while we play the music from Caddy Shack!
    Ok yeah I know it was a gopher but dang that would be cool.
    Those little dogs are fast though. skitish, so I guess the question is how do you make it so they act like the real thing?

    • I have one of the “Self Healing” targets they are dense poly-wazit, mine is round and does not dance to a hit w/22LR Std Vel. I have yet to try it with anything bigger/faster. The concept is a good one, better than leaving shot-up Tinnys laying about.

  5. I have the version of this prairie dog on a spinner, it’s a hoot! The self-healing material leaves “scars” but it has survived everything from .22 to .45ACP, with equal disdain for the shooter (me!) with every hit.

  6. I have two of these… Love em! And lots of times they trap bullets in the hollow space so u can pull em out and see how they mushroom … Was an eye opener for my 22lr hollowpoints

  7. Screw the self-healing target – go shoot the real thing.

    In my mind there is no better endeavor to sharpen your skills as a rifleman than shooting prairie dogs. Small target at two or three hundred yards. Sometimes you shoot on a downslope, sometimes an upslope, sometimes across a shallow valley and prairie winds can be a real challenge to dope.

    Pop guts are a pest that will never be shot out of existence plus the badgers and hawks will thank you endlessly for all the free food. Nothing goes to waste and it is fun as all get out.

    My Dad’s going through his second round of chemo for leukemia and he told me the top of his bucket list is a professionally run prairie dog shoot in Wyoming. I need to get crackin’ on loading all the .223, .22-250 and .243 I can. I can’t wait!

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