Does This Doctor Really Know Best?

What do you say to a highly respected doctor and researcher, a man who made significant, measurable improvements in the medical field, a top administrator who’s globally respected, when he says that everyone should turn in their guns? You say, “no,” of course . . .

Dr. George Lundberg, MD, recently penned an editorial asking all gun owners to turn in their guns to their local police department. Lundberg’s no small-town doc. He has impressive credentials and a history of working to make things better for doctors and patients. He’s even credited with bringing the industry’s largest journal – JAMA – back from the brink during his tenure as its editor. This is a guy whose name is perennially in the hat for Surgeon General.

So, how can someone who is smart – really smart – be so ignorant on a subject like firearms ownership? One reason might be an affliction I’ve coined, called “cultural localization.” Michael Bloomberg is a perfect example of this. Living in the Big Apple, surrounded by armed security, Mayor Mike never has to worry about his safety or needing a gun. He doesn’t wake up to a view of snow-capped mountains, rifles cleaned, scopes sighted, ATV loaded and ready for the day’s hunt. And he certainly never worries about who’s making all that noise at 2 a.m. outside his rural home. Because of his (self-imposed) cultural environment, Mike Bloomberg is not exposed to the reasons others own guns.

Why does Lundberg think eliminating guns will make thigs all better? Barring any political or greed-induced motivations, I have to think that he hasn’t done his research. If his goal is to make life better for “doctor, patient, public citizen” and his motives are genuine, then it would be beneficial for all to provide Dr. Lundberg with objective, verifiable information that he obviously never got before hitting the record button on his video camera.

First, however, let’s address his glaringly flawed appeal process, your last hope at keeping Lundberg’s grabbers from grabbing:

1. I am a gun collector; I run a museum and make my living collecting, showing, and writing about guns.
OK. You may keep your guns, but you may not have any ammunition. Not needed for your line of work.

I’m guessing the doc’s never heard of ammunition collectors. Or reloading. Or Zoot Suit Shoots. In any discussion, you can’t separate the gun from its ammunition; they are, essentially, a single machine.

2. I am in the Army National Guard so I sometimes bring my Army guns home overnight.
OK. Be sure they are locked up without easy access to ammunition for the other occupants of your home.

There’s a new one. Soldiers taking their guns home? “Hey, Gunny, I’m beat and it’s a long walk to the armory. You mind if I just toss this SAW in the back of my Jeep ’til Monday? Cool, thanks.” I’ll let the TTAG’ers with more experience chime in, but I don’t think the National Guard sends its troops home with weapons. It’s becoming painfully obvious Dr. Lundberg recorded his message without much thought at all.

3. I am a police or other peace officer or fireman or public defender criminal investigator and must use guns in my work.
OK. Be sure they are locked up without easy access to ammunition for the other occupants of your home.

First, this statement ignores that cops and other public servants are human, too. There are instances of folks certified to carry guns as a condition of their job, who end up going off the reservation and using their gun as a murder weapon. His suggestion would do nothing to reduce these incidents.

Second, if he can trust a vast portion of the public service sector with nothing more than a “lock it up”, why can’t he trust the rest of us – his colleagues, neighbors, and community leaders – to be just as responsible at securing our firearms?

4. I own and manage a “Shooting Gallery” as my occupation.
OK. Same safety instructions as with 2 and 3.

Um, a shooting gallery? This shows just how out of touch with his subject the good doctor is. For me, the image that springs to mind is one of ducktails and poodle skirts, a James Dean lookalike, Marlboro dangling from the corner of his mouth, showing off his skills with a BB gun so Mary Jo can take home the giant stuffed Teddy bear hanging on the wall above the carny’s head.

C’mon, Doc, at least do some research. You must be good at that, right? I’m guessing you put maybe five minutes thought into your script. Maybe a few notes jotted on the back of a discarded envelope.

5. I like to do target practice for sport, Olympic training, discipline, and fun.
OK. Rent your firearms at the practice facility and leave them there.

Sorry Doc. I don’t trust their security so won’t leave my heaters there. And it sure would make it easier for criminals looking for a big haul. As for renting rather than owning, I learned the hard way when renting airplanes that some people abuse things they don’t own. A gun is a precision instrument and must be handled as such. I don’t want to share one in a rental pool.

6. I like to hunt for food — you know, quail, dove, squirrel, venison, moose meat, even bison.
Come on. Buy your food at the supermarket. Or rent guns from your hunting guide, if you have one.

This is the bullet point that led me to accuse the doctor of cultural localization. Millions of pounds of meat are harvested each year by hunters in our nation’s wildlands. This meat doesn’t just feed the hunter’s family; some is given to friends, and much of it is donated to food banks and shelters.It’s pretty obvious the good doctor has never broken bread with someone that doesn’t know where their next meal might come from.

But the doc’s point fails on another level: having the guns in the hands of a select group of hunting guides. How does one become a hunting guide? Who certifies them as gun-worthy. Guess the doc didn’t think this through either.

7. I always carry, so I can protect myself, my wife, my family, and the public from attacks by criminals at the mall, at my children’s school, or on the freeway.
I respect your motivation but believe that you watched “High Noon” or “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” too many times. Get real. You are more likely to kill yourself, your family, or other innocent people than you are to kill a mall bandido by carrying. Gun permit denied.

This is where Lundberg officially leaves the realm of rational discourse; next stop: ondescending elitest bullshit. I hate going there, but the doctor doesn’t provide anything to back up his erronous statement that defensive gun use and concealed carry brings mayhem wherever it goes.

In fact, even to the casual observer, the opposite is true: places where legal firearm possession is banned are the same places where criminal gun use is off the hook. Every day, people defend themselves and their families from bodily harm and death by using their legally-owned guns. Almost all of the “mass shootings” in recent history happened in places where guns were prohibited.

Look no further than Chicago – a city with laws essentially banning handguns – and you’ll see a city where more shootings occur than in some war zones. Think about that, Doctor; more Americans were shot last weekend in Chicago than in Afghanistan. And it’s not licensed carriers the shooting, because there aren’t any.

8. I keep firearms in my home to protect all Americans from the tyranny of government, just like in 1776.
What? You are a certifiable lunatic if you believe that you, and others like you, could defeat the U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps in a revolution. Trust me. I was a regular officer in the U.S. Army for 11 years. You have no chance.

And the Afghans had no chance against the Soviets, and the North Vietmanese had no chance either, right? You were there. Tyranny is a many-headed beast, and it doesn’t take the big head in the middle to come chomping down on a few natural rights to provide reasons to uphold the Second Amendment.

Recent history shows that local forces can’t be trusted when the levee breaks, and it’s up to the citizens to defend themselves. My personal paradise could go Tango Uniform in the time it takes for Yellowstone’s volcano to burp. If that happens, a gun becomes a multi-tool, able to defend my family from harm, or provide meat for the table.

But according to Lundberg, merely possessing a gun as insurance against an uncertain future, someone like me is a “certifiable lunatic.” Coming from a doctor, that’s a pretty derogatory term, one your colleagues attack whenever it’s used out of context.

9. I need my guns because they make me feel like a man.
How sad. But not a good enough reason. You would probably feel even more like a man by shooting up a theater full of normal people. Psychopath city.

There’s no real use in even addressing this. We’re talking responsible gun owners here, not two-bit thugs, right? No one I know feels this way, and any respect I had for the doctor just went right out the window.

It’s obvious at this point, he’s lumping all gun owners together. It takes a degenerate mind (or degenerating, maybe?) to suggest that millions of responsible adults have the capacity to commit mass murder. I wanted to provide Dr. Lundberg with specific cases where a responsible gun owners used their weapon successfully in defense of their lives, but I don’t think a lack of information is really his problem. Honestly, it sounds like he’s suffering from early-onset dementia.

I could talk about cases like Brianne Rodriguez, or Martha Lewis, women who took the responsibility of self-defense to heart and saved their families from certain tragedy. Or the old men and women, ending crime sprees with muscle memory and a Weaver stance in places like Internet cafes and convenience stores. But I don’t think I’d get through to Dr. Lundberg. Based on his rant, there’s not much rational thought left in that once-great noggin of his.

comments

  1. avatar Joseph Bush says:

    Every time I read an article like this it reminds me how few people are true historians of human nature. Do we remember prohibition? How did that turn out for us? Alcohol use and abuse kills more people worldwide than AIDS, TB or Violence, this per a HuffPo article from Feb of 2011. Yet no calls from the pinnacles of liberalism for people to turn in their liquor. Guess all the politicians like to get their daily cocktail after spending all our hard earned money.

  2. avatar CinSC says:

    “What do you say to a highly respected doctor and researcher, a man who made significant, measurable improvements in the medical field, a top administrator who’s globally respected, when he says that everyone should turn in their guns? ”

    Don’t quit your day job.

    Seriously, just because someone is smart doesn’t mean they can’t be led astray by emotional or irrational thinking. It happens all the time.

    1. avatar GS650G says:

      A friend of mine who is a respected Bio Chemist believes his knowledge, education and experience in the medical sciences extends all the way to political and economic issues. He’s easily entitled to an opinion but that’s about it.

      1. avatar CinSC says:

        Right. Also, an individual’s knowledge in a vast field such as biochemistry is heavily dependent on the research of others. Since there are often significantly differing interpretations of the same research an individual’s outlook will be determined by who’s opinion he trusts. In other words, scientific conclusions can be very subjective.

        An obvious point, but it’s sometimes overlooked when experts are asked by journalists to give their opinions.

        I had a history professor who would characterize another’s statements on historical fact by saying “He’s saying what he says when he talks about history.”

      2. avatar Totenglocke says:

        Which is highly infuriating to those of us who have multiple degrees in areas such as Economics. People think that because they buy stuff occasionally that it makes them an expert on the economy….the fact that uninformed people such as that have brought us such wonderful regulations as the Community Reinvestment Act that caused the housing bubble and financial crisis shows just how much damage these lunatics can do.

      3. avatar dwr says:

        “There is nothing so stupid as an educated man if you get him off the thing he was educated in.” – Will Rogers

    2. avatar ThomasR says:

      http://www.health-care-reform.net/causedeath.htm

      According to an article in The American Medical Association magazine, the third leading cause of mortality is medical mis-treatment causing 225,00 unnecessary deaths per year; sounds like we should outlaw doctors and hospitals before we outlaw our guns.

  3. avatar Dale says:

    “6. Come on. Buy your food at the supermarket. Or rent guns from your hunting guide, if you have one.”

    When I was very young (late 70’s) the family farm hit rough times. For two years my father was granted a state “full-year hunting exemption” and for at least one of those years I am pretty certain that is the only reason there was meat on the table.

    “I respect your motivation but believe that you watched “High Noon” or “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” too many times. Get real. You are more likely to kill yourself, your family, or other innocent people than you are to kill a mall bandido by carrying. Gun permit denied.”

    But I’ll bet the good doctor never bats an eye about the ownership and operation of the far more complex and dangerous piece of equipment known as the automobile.

    I agree completely about what David calls a “cultural environment” or what we used to call an “isolation bubble” or an “ivory tower”.

    1. avatar Will says:

      Don’t ya know that now the grabbers are calling the car/automobile comparison a red herring? (apple to oranges could be used by others of their kind) Their comparison is stuck on how useful an automobile is, ignoring its dangers, and the opposite with firearms. You try to show them and they force their eyes shut. while making noises so they don’t have to hear the other side of the coin and the truths it holds.

  4. avatar JF PhD says:

    Dear MD’s

    Your medical degree does not carry any more weight on the gun control issue than any other person’s opinion. After a life time spent in biotechnolgy and trauma reconstruction, I still maintain my right to keep and bear arms. Thank you very much.

    JF PhD

    (Yes, the PhD is real)

    1. avatar ACA says:

      Dear JF

      Don’t lump all MDs into the same pot.

      ACA MD/PhD. Both real.

  5. avatar Eric S. says:

    You’ll notice in his bio at the bottom of the article it says nothing about actually practicing medicine. This guy is more of a media maven than a doctor. Sure, he consults for pathology, but he doesn’t seem too proud of seeing patients anywhere in his professional history.

    As someone who is married to a doctor, I can tell you

    1. avatar aaronw says:

      Pathology? Quite likely the ones he’s seeing are already dead.

      1. avatar Fyrewerx says:

        He’s never had a patient complain.

  6. avatar Derek Dauma says:

    “What do you say to a highly respected doctor and researcher, a man who made significant, measurable improvements in the medical field, a top administrator who’s globally respected, when he says that everyone should turn in their guns?”

    Whatever my reply would be, the owner of this blog would certainly erase it and replace it with 2 words, all in capital letters, LOL.

    1. avatar Paul says:

      Seconded. In spades.

  7. avatar Rydak says:

    Such a brilliant mind in one area and so profoundly stupid in another.

    I guess there is a price to pay for such privilege…and his is living the life of a sheep.

  8. avatar GS650G says:

    Thank you for your good work in your field, George. But your opinion on my gun ownership counts as much as a Hollywood movie star.

    1. avatar JoshinGA says:

      I think his opinion counts less than a Hollywood star. Smaller audience.

  9. avatar Eric S. says:

    You’ll notice in his bio at the bottom of the article it says nothing about actually practicing medicine. This guy is more of a media maven than a doctor. Sure, he consults for pathology, but he doesn’t seem too proud of seeing patients anywhere in his professional history.

    As someone who is married to a doctor, I can tell you that there are thousands of people who get the MD behind their name who want nothing to do with the general public. I’ve met them in her professional meetings and they’re often looked down upon by those who actually get their hands dirty. The degree helps them get other jobs. This guy just seems like another one of those folks.

  10. avatar John D. says:

    I can say this: I would support gun control if it were the right and moral thing to do. It is not. Based on impartial, objective observation and research, gun control is morally wrong. Gun control creates a culture of victims, of people who rely on the others, namely the government, for protection. This in turn leads to a weakened, sheltered, fearful and helpless society. The right of defense is a natural right and not something for others, no matter how academically inclined they may be, to take away from those who seek self-reliance. Yes, the doctor is smart, but based on his incoherent rambling, he is most certainly lacking in the logic and reasoning department.

  11. avatar JSIII says:

    Three words. What a tool

    Goes to show even an idiot can be an MD pick your doctor carefully.

  12. avatar Chas says:

    Somehow that old saying comes to mind, “Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt”.

    Since the death rate from medical malpractice is much higher than accidental death from gun ownership, I am asking all physicians to turn in their medical licenses.

    1. avatar IdahoPete says:

      +1. Between 95,000 and 100,000 people die every year due to PREVENTABLE medical mistakes in hospitals – mistakes by doctors and other “health professionals”. Please people – stop the carnage! The regulation of the medical profession is clearly inadequate. Outlaw doctors!

      And that represents the same “reasonable medical control” as Dr. Twit wants for guns.

  13. avatar GS650G says:

    The good doctor forgot one:

    10. Feel free to give me a call if you need protection, since I’m so smart about firearms I know how to deal with madmen and murderers. Or call 911, the cops will be there before you hang up the phone.

  14. avatar Wiregrass says:

    There was a time when respected medical experts advocated bleeding to balance the humours as well.

  15. avatar Tim says:

    The comments from the MD/RN members responding to the article are pretty great. I particular like those that say that they should turn in their prescription pads because more people die each year from poisoning due to improper prescriptions that guns. I

    It seems that Dr. Dumbass, I mean Lundberg has lost some credibility with his target audience.

  16. avatar Michael B. says:

    Sutor, ne ultra crepidam.

  17. avatar Tom says:

    Or how about this #10:

    “I’m living in my car with my 2 kids after my husband tried to strangle me with his belt and promised to kill me if he sees me again. I think he tossed the restraining order in the recycling bin.”

    Dr. George: We don’t really need Moms in this world who would try to raise children in a car and can’t make their relationships work. Your husband will calm down eventually. Now, buckle up!

  18. avatar Steve says:

    TTAG must search far and wide to find people as far-out as this.

    A “shooting gallery”…Wha…? Does he mean like the ones you find at Smokey’s Greater shows? Does he not know that those are fake guns (well, air guns)?

    I swear, people like this fit the cartoonish stereotypes so well that you have to wonder if they are plants. Intentional plants that read from a script.

  19. avatar Mr. Lion says:

    As intelligent as one might be in a given field of study, there’s nothing stopping them from being a complete drooling idiot on other matters. If anything, the superiority complex most succumb to in such positions only reinforces their ignorance on other matters. Case in point: 99.9% of academia.

  20. avatar Steve says:

    ” 6. I like to hunt for food — you know, quail, dove, squirrel, venison, moose meat, even bison. Come on. Buy your food at the supermarket. Or rent guns from your hunting guide, if you have one.”

    The good doctor also seems to misunderstand a cucial fact about hunting that I’m surprised no one else has brought up yet. Not only is hunting a viable means of procuring food for the lead-fortunate (as someone who grew up in the rural American South, I can tell you that this happens a lot), but it also serves as a vital means of population control for the game species.

    Cultivation of land for agriculture means two things: predator species decline in number, and, due to the increase in food availability, prey species increase in number. Without well-managed hunting, these populations quickly rise to the point of causing starvation and disease, not to mention the increased public nuisance that they pose.

    I’m sure that the doctor would suggest limiting this population management to game watermelon. Leaving aside the issue of waste, this creates a huge additional workload

    1. avatar Steve says:

      Grah, posting from a phone means no edit button and stupid auto-correct. Watermelons are irrelevant. What I meant to say:

      ” 6. I like to hunt for food — you know, quail, dove, squirrel, venison, moose meat, even bison. Come on. Buy your food at the supermarket. Or rent guns from your hunting guide, if you have one.”

      The good doctor also seems to misunderstand a cucial fact about hunting that I’m surprised no one else has brought up yet. Not only is hunting a viable means of procuring food for the lead-fortunate (as someone who grew up in the rural American South, I can tell you that this happens a lot), but it also serves as a vital means of population control for the game species.

      Cultivation of land for agriculture means two things: predator species decline in number, and, due to the increase in food availability, prey species increase in number. Without well-managed hunting, these populations quickly rise to the point of causing starvation and disease, not to mention the increased public nuisance that they pose.

      I’m sure that the doctor would suggest limiting this population management to game wardens. Leaving aside the issue of waste, this creates a huge additional workload on the forestry authorities, and requires expansion of the “okay, we trust you with guns, but keep them locked up” category, which kind of invalidated the whole idea.

  21. avatar styrgwillidar says:

    “8. I keep firearms in my home to protect all Americans from the tyranny of government, just like in 1776.
    What? You are a certifiable lunatic if you believe that you, and others like you, could defeat the U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps in a revolution. Trust me. I was a regular officer in the U.S. Army for 11 years. You have no chance.”

    As a regular officer you took an oath, as did every other serviceman, to the consitution of the United States, not it’s government, not the politicians in office. To a concept of government which guarantees particular rights to the people. Most US officers won’t support a government/politicians violating that constitution. True civil war with many taking their weapons/equipment and supporting the side they view as upholding the constitution. Now, what gets interesting is if we take your advice, give up our guns, than we run the risk that 170,000,000 people suffered in the 20th century of being killed by our own government. But with you it’s ok if we’re disarmed first so we can go down without a struggle…

    1. avatar Silver says:

      Simply because he has a statist and anti-Constitution outlook, and as a soldier would have rounded up and killed civilians without a second thought, he believes every soldier would.

      Further, why don’t we ask him to tell us more about how the Iraqis/Afghanis had no chance fighting off the might of the US armed forces?

    2. avatar Moonshine7102 says:

      Methinks the good doctor never had the difference between “O’s” and “zeros” explained to him. Pity. Somewhere there’s a Sar-Major who failed in one of his duties.

    3. avatar Totenglocke says:

      As a regular officer you took an oath, as did every other serviceman, to the consitution of the United States, not it’s government, not the politicians in office.

      Sorry, but it gets a little old hearing people claim that the oath actually means anything. The reality is that for at least a century (possibly more), the oath is just an old ritual that they’re forced to do and it doesn’t mean anything. We all know that their job is to do whatever corrupt politicians tell them to do. The don’t believe their oath any more than a politician means the same oath to uphold the Constitution when taking office.

  22. avatar Silver says:

    There’s a reason Bond villains are (mostly) always portrayed as intelligent. Intelligence has nothing to do with morality. Some of the most evil people in the world are also the most learned. I truly cannot understand why people as a whole believe that those who hold the most degrees must therefore always be “right.”

    This man is a good example of how intelligence can so easily coexist with evil, and how they are the most dangerous sorts of enemies.

    1. avatar Greg Camp says:

      He does have the mad scientist look to him.

    2. avatar Luis says:

      Francois Duvalier, of Haiti
      Antonio de Oliveira Salazar, of Portugal
      Josef Mengele
      Hawley Harvey Crippen
      Thomas Neill Cream

      All were doctors. Duvalier and Salazar were dictators, Mengele performed inhuman “experiments” in the Nazi death camps, and Crippen and Cream were murderers.

      And Holmes, the guy who shot up that theater in Aurora, CO was a medical student.

  23. avatar Joe says:

    I’m a pediatrician and I own guns… I live in a community with over 90% gun ownership and where 11 year olds know more about firearm safety than most members of the AAP… This guy reminds me of the old joke… What’s the difference between a doctor and God? God doesn’t think he is a doctor…

  24. avatar Bill Baldwin says:

    “You are a certifiable lunatic if you believe that you, and others like you, could defeat the U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps in a revolution. “

    Or perhaps the 2A is standing the way of a need for another revolution. 230 years later and we’re still a Republic, just sayin’.

    1. avatar Totenglocke says:

      Wrong. We stopped being a Republic and became a Democracy – or to put it another way, a tyranny of 50.01% of those who vote. The Constitution no longer applies and if they can convince 50.01% of the 60% of the population that votes to support it, it’ll be crammed down our throats, regardless of how illegal it is.

      1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

        +1000

        This is why I have been beating the drums.

        We need to educate people about the basics of Natural Rights, the Social Contract, a Constitutionally Limited Republic, and their benefits.

        We also need to educate people where our nation has failed in those regards, the casualties of that failure, and the potential for tremendously higher numbers of casualties.

    2. avatar JJAK says:

      Not that I feel in imminent danger of the military being deployed internally, but to address his argument: I may have no chance, but that doesn’t mean I will go without a fight. And it will not take long for the police or military or whomever comes in the night to start dreading that the next no-knock raid or political enemy they confront will be their last.

      And he makes an incorrect assumption that the armed forces would not have their own dissent issues should they be ordered to start rounding up citizens, if the citizens have guns or not.

      1. avatar Totenglocke says:

        And he makes an incorrect assumption that the armed forces would not have their own dissent issues should they be ordered to start rounding up citizens, if the citizens have guns or not.

        Sorry, but history disagrees with you on that one.

  25. avatar Matt in FL says:

    What do you say to him? Nothing. Not a damn thing. You shake your head, and walk away from any direct interaction with this guy. Some people are so far gone, so entrenched in their opinions, that you can do nothing to change their minds. It’s simply not worth your time.

    The only thing you can do is make sure that you talk to the people he’s talking to, in an effort to rebut his fallacious and erroneous statements, so that those people, who are still capable of rational thought and decision making, have the correct information on which to base their own decisions and opinions.

  26. “This is a guy whose name is perennially in the hat for Surgeon General.” – If you want a job in the current admin, then you have to talk their talk. That’s all there is to this individuals view point, i would wager it is to advance his career options more than anything else.

  27. avatar Jarhead says:

    Here is what I sent him. Feel free to leave the good Dr. a piece of your mind as well. His email is feedback@medpagetoday.com

    The following is from JAMA: His own publication!

    Doctors Kill More People
    Than Guns and Traffic Accidents Combined

    The following admissions were taken from JAMA:

    The top five causes of death in the United States, in order, are tobacco, alcohol, medical malpractice, traffic and firearms. According to JAMA, doctors kill more people than auto accidents and guns. With that in mind, one has to wonder why gun control is such a hot legislative issue when, perhaps, we should be more concerned about doctor control.

    The number of people that doctors kill per day from medical malpractice is roughly equal to the amount of people that would die if every day, three jumbo jets crashed and killed everybody on board, commented Dr. Welch who added, in defense of his own profession, just imagine what headlines would result if a chiropractor or a naturopath accidentally killed just one patient?

    Another JAMA statistic stated that 1/5 (20 percent) of all people who see an allopath will suffer a doctor-induced injury.

    Again, according to JAMA, 16 percent of all people who die in the hospital are determined by autopsy to have died of something other than their admission diagnosis. In other words, the doctor had no idea what was really wrong with the patient and, therefore, the patient may have died for want of appropriate care that would have been subsequent to an accurate diagnosis.

    Another trade publication, American Medical News, stated that 28 percent of people admitted to hospitals are there because they have suffered an adverse reaction to prescribed drugs.

    We are miserably losing the battle against viruses and bacteria. Antibiotics do not work. We need to take a different tack because this is obviously not working, said Dr. Welch. Dr. Welch made numerous practical and logical observations throughout his lecture. One of them is so obvious that it deserves mention here. When there is an epidemic of, say, pertussis in a school and 14 of 200 kids get sick, who gets studied? he asked. The answer, of course, is that the sick kids get studied. They get studied by the county health district and the health district accumulates its data and then tells the newspapers about the epidemic of sickness and everybody then flocks down to the health district or goes to see their doctor to get vaccinated.

    Would it not be more appropriate to study the 186 kids that did not get sick? I asked Dr. Welch. Dr. Welch also read a quote from the British Medical Journal which states that only one percent of all scientific research papers which explore medicine are scientifically sound.

    So, if that is true, then not only are allopathic doctors incorrect in their understanding of the basic nature of disease, they are basing 99 percent of their conclusions, and therefore their diagnosis and treatment of people, on flawed science.

  28. avatar jwm says:

    if i develope a case of the shits i’ll talk to the doc. otherwise he needs to stay out of my business.

  29. avatar Greg Camp says:

    His begging is beyond the pale of rational discussion. The only answer to him is molon labe. We’re armed, and he’s not. The good news for him is that as long as he doesn’t pose a direct threat to our lives, we’re not going to hurt him.

  30. avatar Aharon says:

    “What do you say to a highly respected doctor and researcher…”

    — You say the same words that you’d say to a highly respected marksman and gun designer who goes on to assume without having done objective and factual research that he can arrogantly give advice about major changes to the medical field: STFU you ignoramus.

    “So, how can someone who is smart – really smart – be so ignorant on a subject like firearms ownership? One reason might be an affliction I’ve coined, called “cultural localization”.

    — First off, there are several types of intelligence. Having one type does not mean a person has any of the others. Secondly, being a skilled and informed healer does not mean a person is a skilled and informed protector of public safety.

    “Cultural Localization” might be applicable though with an elitist politician like Bloomberg it may simply be that he doesn’t care how many millions of serfs err average citizens are killed to remake American society. Mao, Hitler, Stalin, King George, Queen Elizabeth, Abraham Lincoln, Mohamed, Cesar, never carried how many humans suffered and died to create the world, nation, and society ‘they’ wanted. Elitists are more obsessed with their visions and egos and how history will lionize them than the shorter term necessary sacrifices.

  31. avatar Frodo says:

    You must not have learned yet that the smartest men and women have the least amount of common sense.

  32. avatar JJAK says:

    He’s entitled to his opinion, and I’m entitled to get a second one. Or third. Or more.

    I love reading these “if I were king of the world, I would decree…” articles, they’re pure fantasy stupid.

  33. avatar Patrick Shockley says:

    I have been in the National Guard for four years and have never head of ANYONE taking a weapon home.

  34. avatar RIGHT! says:

    The KGB called these PPL Sh** Eaters

  35. avatar DaveL says:

    I respect your motivation but believe that you watched “High Noon” or “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” too many times. Get real. You are more likely to kill yourself, your family, or other innocent people than you are to kill a mall bandido by carrying.

    I think the good doctor needs to spend a few nights in the “Dial 911 for Moral Support” areas of Detroit. I imagine he’d rethink his assessment.

  36. avatar DaveL says:

    Come on. Buy your food at the supermarket. Or rent guns from your hunting guide, if you have one.

    Michigan sold almost 700,000 licenses last year for deer season alone. This is about the number required to keep the deer population stable, if not a little too low. There just aren’t enough guides, and that’s not likely to change.

  37. avatar Kendahl says:

    There are people who believe they are uniquely well equipped to tell everyone else how best to live their lives. Doctors are often among the worst. I expect he also disapproves of anyone whose hobby is riding motorcycles or horses, mountain climbing, hang gliding or parachuting, etc. and has no compunction about meddling in his employees’ private lives.

  38. avatar Soccerchainsaw says:

    In my profession (engineering) I can lose my PE License for practicing outside my area of expertise. I guess doctors aren’t held to a similar high standard.

  39. avatar Herb says:

    This doctor is an arrogant snot. That’s all.

    Ask him how he intends to put teeth in his arguments. Is he prepared to go door to door and demand, “Give me your guns.”? If not, who cares what he thinks?

  40. avatar theaton says:

    At one point in our history, Doctors were the most educated people for miles around. And by educated, I mean book learnin’. The doctors healed the peoples children and used big words. This caused many of the people to defer to the knowledge of the doctor. I believe this is why doctors are held in such high regard today. Don’t get me wrong, there are many brilliant doctors. However, book learning on one subject does not make them smarter on rights then anyone else. Many times, educated people , especially over educated people, lack common sense.

  41. avatar ExNuke says:

    Senility and dementia are sad things to see especially when they occur in someone who was previously so intelligent. It must be hard on the family.

  42. avatar kamagra says:

    Great video. I have a “20 something” nephew in boot camp at Ft. Jackson, SC even as I am typing. He is planning to join the National Guard in Texas. We salute you Jeremy. Thank you for training to fight for us and keep us safe. God Bless all of our soldiers who are serving and have served.

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