Gun Review: Stoeger Double Defense Over/Under 12 Gauge

Back in the day, Wells Fargo stagecoach drivers carried short barreled side-by-side shotguns to fend off n’er do wells. With the advent of pump action and semi-automatic shotguns, self-defense-minded Americans abandoned break-action shotguns to hunting, skeet and trap shooters. With the advent of  cowboy action shooting, the coach gun reappeared—with a vengeance. And then cowboy-catering Stoeger saw the tacticool light. They painted it black (you devil), threw a couple of picatinny rails on board, added a fiberoptic sight and eis! The Stoeger Condor was reborn as the Double Defense. And then reborn again as an over/under gun (for those who can’t take sides). Should you trust your life to this shotty? Well . . .

Let’s start with a comparison between the ridiculous and the sublime. Submitted for your consideration: a $375 Brazilian shotty and my $3k Beretta 687 Silver Pigeon III. Other than price, style, quality, materials, decoration, provenance and form, they’re identical. In fact, both 12-gauge shotguns would be formidable in a fight. But one’s more formidable than the other. Beauty and the Beast. Point taken? No? Try this . . .

E.R. Amantino in Veranópolis, Brazil manufactures the Double Defense for Stoeger. They’ve been making shotguns for the Brazilian military and police forces since 1962. According to their website, “[w]e manufacture shotguns to be in contact with the nature respecting its cycles and preservation, not to kill people.”

Maybe they haven’t updated their site since they started cranking out the Double Defense, but it’s pretty clear that this bad boy isn’t made “to be in contact with the nature respecting its cycles and preservation.” Nah, this thing’s made to kill people. That said, I wouldn’t hesitate to take it deer/dove/pig hunting—if that’s all I had available.

When you first pick up the gun, you immediately notice that this is one stout, heavy-duty piece of kit. Whereas the Beretta 687 invokes images of a gazelle, the Stoeger is pure wildebeest. Even so, overall workmanship and wood-to-metal finish is quite good, especially given the price point.

Make no mistake: everything on the DD is utilitarian grade, from the high-carbon steel to the matte blue finish and the matte black stained wood. Most of that’s fine by me, but I have noticed that the barrel assembly is more prone to rust than I’d like. This is particularly evident underneath the handguard and behind the side picatinny rails.

In fact, the Stoeger had a small amount of surface rust behind the side picatinny rail before I even fired the gun. At first I thought the finish was a type of weather-resistant Parkerizing, that’s not the case. I’d recommend keeping these hidden areas lubed with a small film of heavy grease.

A single trigger fires both barrels. Even though I fired roughly 500 rounds through the Double Defense, I’m at a loss to remember anything about the go pedal. But an unremarkable trigger on a defense-oriented shotgun is a good thing. If it had been too light, too heavy or had too much creep, it would have stood out. By not drawing attention to itself, the trigger proves that it’s just right.

As with all internal hammer shotgun designs, the recoil of the first round resets the hammer  for the a second shot. When dry firing the top barrel, you have to bump the stock on the ground slightly in order to simulate the recoil of the bottom barrel’s shell igniting.

High end over/under shotguns have a throw lever on the tang safety that allows the user to select which barrel fires first. The Stoeger doesn’t. Why would it? Benelli M2 owners note: the less things the operator has to manipulate on a defensive shotgun, the better.

On the other hand, ejectors. Shotguns with ejectors punt spent shell casings out of both chambers when the breech is opened. As you’d expect at this price point, the Stoeger Double Defense is equipped with a single extractor. The device backs the shells out of the chamber a quarter inch or so. The operator then pulls them out the rest of the way manually.

Again, this is no bad thing. Gunsmiths report that ejectors account for the vast majority of mechanical problems with over and under shotguns. The parts that comprise the ejector system are under a lot of tension and stress [ED: who isn't?] and tend to break under prolonged use.

When I first unboxed the Stoeger, the tang safety was tight. After manipulating the trigger back and forth a few hundred times, it’s smoothed out. A bit. A gunsmith could (and should) polish the safety to improve its function. On a weapon intended for self-defense, every part of the gun should be easy to manipulate.

Once the gun’s broken in, disassembly is easy. In theory. The Double Defense comes from the factory tighter than the Tower of Power horn section. Wrangling off the fore-end takes mega-muscle. The part’s held to the barrel via a serrated, half-moon, wheel-style release. As far as I can tell, it’s a unique design—as in “that’s a unique dress you’re wearing tonight dear.” Not a deal breaker, though.

The Double Defense features a standard box-lock over/under action complete with machine-turned monoblock sides. Recesses on either side of the receiver engage trunion pins, on which the barrels pivot, allowing for smooth opening and closing. The gun requires a good deal of force to break open after a shell is fired. Again, gunsmiths need apply.

The block is jeweled, which is somewhat of an unexpected feature on such an inexpensive gun. However, even out of the box there were gouges in the metal that detract from its appearance. As shown in the photo above, these gouges have increased in number over the two months I’ve been testing the gun through normal handling.

Range Time

For testing purposes, I ran as many different types of ammo through the Stoeger as I could get my hands on. A partial sample is shown in the photo above. I put around 500 rounds through the gun, including the following types:

  • 1 ounce, 2¾ in.  Brenneke K.O. slugs;
  • 1 ounce 2¾ in Federal Trueball Deep Penetrator slugs;
  • 2¾ in Olin “Military Grade”  No. 00 Buckshot (9 pellets)
  • 2¾ in Remington No. 00 Buckshot (9 pellets)
  • 1¼ ounce 3 inch Federal  Magnum Rifled Slug HP
  • 1¼ ounce 3 inch Federal  Magnum No. 00 Buckshot (15 pellets)
  • 1 & 1/8 ounce 2¾ in.  Federal “Top Gun” #8 shot and #7½  shot
  • Various Remington Premier  STS Target loads, #9 shot, #8 shot, etc.

Most of what I shot was rack-grade target birdshot. Clay pigeons laid against a dirt berm made a good reactive target to test the handling and accuracy of the gun. The Stoeger points well and made quick work of the clays at 15-25 yards.

The photo above shows one round of the relatively inexpensive 1  1/8 ounce, 2¾ in. Federal “Top Gun” #7½  shot fired at 20 yards. This round contains around 400 pellets. As you can tell from the photo, the pattern is roughly 20 inches across.  This tells me that if you’re planning to use birdshot for self defense, you’d better plan on engaging the target at 10 yards or less. [Note: “Self defense” shooting scenarios become more legally dubious if the attacker is more than seven to ten yards from the defender.]

The shot above is the result of two rounds of 1¼ ounce 3 inch Federal No. 00 Magnum Buckshot (15 pellets) fired at 15 yards in rapid-fire mode (roughly one second between shots). Although my original intention was to shoot the bottom target with the bottom barrel, I ended up doing it backwards. In both cases, all 15 pellets are on target The spread is roughly 12 inches for the first shot, and a little over 10 for the second – pretty ideal for a self-defense situation. You can see from the photo that the top barrel (bottom target) is printing a few inches to the right.

The photograph above shows one round of 1 ounce 2¾ in Federal Trueball Deep Penetrator slugs placed in each of the two 18 inch Shoot-N-See targets from 20 yards.  The first round was from the bottom barrel and hit just under my point of aim on the top target. No issue there; I was using a using a raised red-dot optic.

The top barrel, on the other hand, consistently shot a few inches to the right at 20 yards.  Note on the bottom target, you can see what appears to be a bullseye hit just above the red center aiming circle. That jagged hole is caused by the plastic wad that follows the lead projectile. The slug hit around 4 inches to the right and two inches down from center.

I shot three more Tru-ball Deep Penetrator rounds from the same distance, and got consistent results. Keep in mind I was shooting offhand and at rapid “self-defense” speed.  And some of the perceived “hits” are actually just the wad and plastic ball tearing through the target.

Unlike the jagged holes left by the wad, the slug itself left very precise, round holes. Also, given that I was firing rapidly, I wouldn’t say these groups are a measure of the inherent “benched” accuracy of the ammo or barrels, but are rather show the real-world accuracy you can expect when using this weapon with slugs.

Overall, I was pleased with the way the Stoeger shot. While the barrel alignment wasn’t perfect, it certainly was good enough to fill its intended role.

Reliability

My Google-Fu unearthed a few posts accusing the Double Defense of a malfunction that caused both barrels to fire simultaneously. It didn’t happen to me. The test gun ate all of the 2¾ and 3 inch shells I could feed it without any problems. I feel confident in pronouncing it mechanically sound.

 What To Do With Those Rails?

As shown above, the Stoeger is ready to fill the role of deer sniper – topped with a 3-12 x 56 Zeiss Conquest and a cheap Ramline bipod. JK. But shooting slugs at 100 yards with my “.729 x 76.2mm smoothbore sniper rifle” was a ton o’ fun! The Double D was pretty darn accurate, all things considered.

Three shot groups averaged in the five to eight inch range (using the bottom barrel only).  Brenneke K.O. slugs are even more accurate, putting in four to six inch groups on average.  With a few adjustments I think I could even improve on that. So even though I’d prefer to hunt deer with a rifled-barrel shotgun that fires sabot slugs, the Stoeger could fill the deer assassin role in a pinch.

Or, if sniping with slugs isn’t your thing, you can release your inner “gangsta” with a vertical foregrip on the side rail! Do gangstas’ really use Aimpoints? I thought the whole point to being a gangsta was not to aim. So maybe this set up was totally stupid, just like gangstas.

TTAG has lampooned the Laserlite Pistol bayonet. I shared that disdain. But—if you can avoid slicing friendlies or yourself to ribbons during initial deployment, a dual bayonet-equipped Double Defense (Quadruple Defense?) would certainly discourage a bad guy from rushing you after you’d expended your two shots.

The twin blade Double D is a bit “mall ninja” for my tastes, and it just might send the wrong message to a post-incident prosecutor. More than that, when my wife saw the bayonets on the Stoeger, she suddenly thought she had a new tool for weeding her vegetable garden and edging the lawn. Obviously, that could be problematic.

Is this Thing Really Viable for Self Defense?  

The Double Defense’s two-round capacity isn’t as big a liability as one might imagine—especially if you’re using a shotgun as a last ditch defensive weapon (having fought your way to the scattergun with your handgun). If you know you only have two rounds on board, you’re more likely going to make them count. And two rounds you can fire—as opposed to multiple rounds you can’t (short-stroking a pump, failing to set-up a semi, etc.)—make no small amount of sense.

Conversely, if you know you have 20 rounds in your Glock 17, you might be more tempted to spray and pray. There’s plenty of video evidence of cops doing this in gun fights. And the vast majority of gunfights are settled in one or two rounds – especially when those rounds are fired from a shotgun.

Perhaps it’s best to think of the Stoeger Double Defense as The Mother of All Derringers.

On the downside, a shotgun with a safety that automatically engages after reloading? In my opinion, any sort of manually-operated safety is a potential liability on a home defense weapon. But then I’m a little crazy that way, and drop safe isn’t just a Road Runner cartoon concept.

Conclusion

As you can see below, the Stoeger Double Defense has made some new friends amongst the existing home defense regulars at Casa Grine. ‘Nuff said?

SPECIFICATIONS:

Caliber: 12 gauge (.729 inches)
Action: Break open
Capacity: 2 rounds
Overall Length: 36 ½ inches
Barrel Length: 20″
Weight:  7.1 lbs. unloaded
Choke:  Fixed Improved Cylinder (IC)
Sight: green fiber-optic front sight
Finish: matte blue metal, matte black stained hardwood
Price: $479 (MSRP)   $350-400 (street price)

RATINGS (out of five stars):

Style  * * * * *
The Double Defense is a love-it-or hate it type affair. If you are into tacticool, you will love it. Otherwise, meh. In my case, black suits me just fine.

Ergonomics  * * * *
The Stoeger is comfortable to shoot. Recoil is manageable even with full-powered 3 inch slugs and buckshot. The stock has a length of pull of 14 ½ inches and a drop at comb of 1 3/8 inches. The rubberized buttpad does a good job of taming recoil, but it does tend to catch on clothing. Again, the action and the safety need a bit of fine tuning, as discussed below.

Reliability * * * * *
The gun worked like a charm. I experienced none of the double fires that have been reported by others on various internet forums.

Customize This  * * * * *
With three Picatinny rails, you can get stupid with lights, optics, bayonets, etc.

Accuracy  * * *
The Stoeger’s accurate enough to serve its intended purpose, but the slightly misaligned top barrel calls for a two-point deduction. The defect was only apparent when shooting slugs out of the top barrel. With birdshot or slugs, I really didn’t notice it much. Chris and I spent an afternoon shooting beargrass flowers from 15-30 yards; the Stoeger put enough lead on target to chop the flower off every time.

Refinement  * * *
The Double Defense needs some ‘smith work to achieve its true potential. Break open is too stiff after a round is fired, the tang safety needs to be polished smooth and the chambers could be touched up so the shells can be flicked out.

Overall   * * * 1/2
A solid effort given the price point. To keep the cost of the gun down, the manufacturer hasn’t taken the time to smooth out some of the rough edges. If you’re willing to get some work done on the gun, you’ll have a yourself a solid performer.

 

48 Responses to Gun Review: Stoeger Double Defense Over/Under 12 Gauge

  1. avatarNate says:

    I want one really bad, tho I wish they had put a railed front stock instead of the rails on the sides.

    “over/under gun (for those who can’t take sides)”

    As a connoisseur of fine puns, I applaud you sir.

  2. avatarAge Quod Agis says:

    I think Col. Ludlow would be proud to own one.

  3. avatarThomas Paine says:

    yeah, but do you really want the prosecuter holding that thing up in court when there is a case against you? If you’re gonna go side-by-side or over/under for HD, I’d prefer a wood stock and some nice engraving. It’s always nice when the jury thinks “oh, granpa had a shotgun like that, and he’s a great guy”.

    • avatarAharon says:

      Excellent comment. Courtroom verdicts can sometimes have nothing to do with justice, the truth, and the facts. Having a gun so ‘customized’ is about the same as a prosecutor holding up a home-owner’s t-shirt (who shot an intruder) that glorifies killing people.

    • avatarTommy Truth says:

      Why would you be in court facing a jury?

  4. avatarirock350 says:

    Utilitarian shot gun it ain’t. That ugly, plastic, railed abortion is just good for shooting objects slightly out of pistol range, like bad guys at the end of the hall. You would have to be very close for this to be effective for wild game of any sort. (My definition of close and wild game rests comfortably at the 50 yard mark, anything in front of that it too close for comfort. A couple of run-ins with angry pigs who refused to lie down from a 30-30 will do that to a man.)

    • avatarVigilantis says:

      What plastic? He said the furniture was black-stained wood. Moreover, I know people who shoot deer at under 20 yards. I realize it’s probably not up to your aristocratic standards, but us peasants could probably manage to tag a buck with a 12 ga. slug at that range.

      Honestly, I’d much prefer my .30-06 for any game larger than a rabbit, but I won’t begrudge a man for using a home defense shotgun to take game, so long as he kills them quickly.

    • avatarJ Miller says:

      What plastic? I own a Stoeger DD O/U and i just left the range. I shot some Remington Hollow point Magnum Slugs out of it at 50yds and it performed very will at that yardage. I also use some Zombie Maxx 8 pellet 00 bucks at 25yds and it was on point and didn’t miss a beat. My Shorty is performing very well at this point. If i have any problems in the future i will definitely post the problem I’m having. Give the gun a try first before you knock it.

  5. avatarMontesa_VR says:

    I applaud the concept, but I think I’ll wait for Ruger or Savage to give us a slightly more refined version.

  6. avatarDrewR55 says:

    I’ve been looking at the Stoeger pump shotguns pretty seriously to take up the slack left by my old Wingmaster (it’s getting a little long in the tooth). Do you know if this Brazilian company also produces their P-350? I only ask because of the warning about the potential for rust.

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      Not sure about the P-350. With regard to the rust, it is probably worth noting that i live in Western Oregon, which is a damp, rainy kind of place. Rust, fungus, and mold is a bigger issue with all of my guns as compared to other places I live. If you live in Oregon, you generally have to go through your collection every 6 months or so and re-oil everything just to make sure things are nice and dry. I use a de-humidifier as well.

  7. avatarSD3 says:

    I still like the ‘pocket’ version best.

    The Heizer .45 DoubleTap.

  8. avatarbontai Joe says:

    I could easily see this one in my gun cabinet. The price is certainly right for what you get.

  9. avatarJohn Boch says:

    One of the FFLs at Guns Save Life is offering one of these in a fundraising drawing for a girl who has some sort of obscure blood cancer disorder.

    He brought it to the last couple of meetings.

    My observations from fondling it: The top rail obscures the front sight. That’s a problem unless you drop some cash into an optic. If you do that though, you’re doubling the price of this gun to about $700+. For that, you can get an 870 Wingmaster and have enough for add-ons like a sling and side-saddle and a bevy of shells to practice with.

    The action was tight. WAY too tight. I had to bang the gun across my knee to open the action to show clear after it was uncased. That’s not acceptable. With work it would probably open normally, but I shouldn’t have to pour $40-50 in gunsmithing work into a brand new gun to get it to work as it should. I mean, am I asking too much for the action to open without fighting the gun?

    I like the side rails for an inexpensive, easy-to-mount tac light. Or dueling bayonets.

    The idea of only two rounds before a reload for self- / home-defense concerns me, but it’s not a deal-breaker.

    Oh and the bottom barrel as I recall was modified choke and the top was IC.

    In the end I was going to buy two tickets as it was for a good cause, but he had sold out already. The gun (or the cause or a combination thereof) seemed quite popular with the guys and gals at the meeting.

    Seeing the part about propensity to rust pretty much scratched off the inclinations I had to maybe buy one and test drive it.

    In the meantime, I inherited a couple of sawed-off single-shot guns at that meeting for the next Chicago gun turn in. I might drop a 00-Buck in one of those and keep it in the corner of the garage until the next turn in, just in case.

    It’s one shot, half the firepower of this gun. Better sights. Shorter package and it opens nicely.

    John

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      I probably should have mentioned it in the article, but the top rail is held in place by three screws and is easily removed if you want to use the bead sight.

  10. avatarspymyeyes says:

    wow.

    After yesterday’s outright brawl over how many (or to few) rounds you should carry and what kinda gat you should be packin, now enter the 2-shot specials!

    Sorry guys but I will stick with my $300 pump-mossy.
    When I decide to upgrade it will NOT be backwards in time to a double barrel but to a tacti-cool semi-auto shotty.

    • avatarbrigo50 says:

      D00d, you cant put knives on it though?! Thats what this one is for, gangsta style side by side and twin stabby death like you would see in a Blade movie.

      • avatarJoe Grine says:

        @ Brigo50: You do recognize that the section of the article entitled “What to do with those rails” was intended for humor, right?

        • avatarsb says:

          Has anyone actually shot the gun with the blades on it?
          I know it looks crazy, but our range is having a post apocalyptic zombie shoot out on Halloween. Would be fun for a day and not to costly to add the blades. Just want to know if you actually shot with them on and the 00 or slugs cleared the blades???
          Great article BTW. I own one and your assessment was very accurate!

        • avatarJoe Grine says:

          @ SB Yeah. I did fire it with the blades on it just for fun. Clearance of shot is not an issue. However, the first time I tried it, I had left the plastic sheaths on the blades and those got blown off and broken. The manufacturer did me a solid and sent me some new ones free of charge!

  11. avatarDrewN says:

    As long as I can still get a Rock Island pump for $199 with a lifetime warranty, no thanks.

  12. avatarAharon says:

    “My Google-Fu unearthed a few posts accusing the Double Defense of a malfunction that caused both barrels to fire simultaneously. It didn’t happen to me.”

    I’m glad that so far yours is shooting reliably. I’ve posted here before about the Stoeger line of Coach Guns. When I did my research about 18 months ago, I found LOTS of online criticism written by owners that the single trigger versions of the SxS Coach Guns and especially the O&U Condor model had reliability problems with the second barrel not firing. Essentially you’re expecting an inexpensive double barrel shotgun to fire the second barrel like a semi-auto. Perhaps Stoeger has fixed the problem and perhaps some individual units work fine and others still don’t. I believe that all the cowboy action shooters only use the SxS double-trigger models and most of those guys have a CAS gunsmith do some fine tuning of their Stoeger Coach Guns. I have read mostly good things about the reliability of the double-trigger SxS Coach Gun models. Regardless, for home defense use I would prefer a SxS to an O&U model.

    • avatarMark says:

      A few CAS shooters do use single-trigger doubles. I had an issue with trigger re-set failure on a borrowed one. My wife and I have twin trigger Baikal/IZH SXSs smithed for CAS use and while I do miss the Mossberg pump, we actually practice shooting and reloading these. Both shotguns fire both barrels to the same point of aim and function flawlessly. Four doses of buckshot between the two of us should fix any problem we can address on our own.

  13. avatarTearsofNorris says:

    All of the “high end” features you “wouldn’t expect” at this price point like selectable barrels, independent extractors, etc. are found on the $400 Yildiz.

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      True True…. if you can find one. I’ve never even seen one in these parts of the Country.

  14. avatarMike S says:

    If the chokes were screw-in, and you could select which barrel to fire, I’d kinda dig it as a potential camp/trail gun.

    Something to keep in mind also- the US isn’t the only gun market in the world. In a market like Australia, where access to pump shotguns is very limited, or in others where they have to be plugged to 2 or 3 shells anyway, this gun might appear more attractive.

  15. avatarMotoJB says:

    I used to love my Stoeger (side by side) coach gun…now for some reason, it’s frozen/stuck with two spent shells and won’t open. Not sure why. This is after only about 100-200 rounds of birdshot through it. Now I have to send it back to Stoeger for repair. Not happy.

  16. avatarscott says:

    I have a SxS version. I took off the rails and now it doesn’t look so over-the-top. I love mine. I find that this is taking over more and more as my kick around gun. I take it on my atv, in the back of the truck, etc. The thing that makes this gun grow on me is just the size and handiness of it, plus I don’t worry about beating up the stock. It’s a little heavy, but it’s short and breaks down easily to be even shorter.

  17. avatarKen says:

    “Benelli M2 owners note: the less things the operator has to manipulate on a defensive shotgun, the better.”

    As a multiple Benelli M1/M2 user, I’d just be giddy if you can further ‘splain this comment.

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      Don’t ask me, ask Dan! He wrote it. I owned a Benelli M1 Super 90 for many years. IMHO, its the finest combat shotgun ever made.

  18. avatarbob says:

    I must ask, is that a real MP-5 or a .22 clone in the last picture?

  19. avatarAJ says:

    Loved the review Joe, well done! The gun is beautiful in a really rough sort of way. Think rusted out Toyota pickup.

    If you don’t mind disclosing, whereabouts do you hail from? Colorado? That scenery is stunning.

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      I’m from Portland. That top photo is taken from campsite 8, Soda Creek Campground, Sparks Lake, Oregon. That big volcano in the background is South Sister (aka “Charity”), Three Sisters Wilderness.

  20. avatarJ says:

    Honestly, I would prefer a double trigger model. A slug in one barrel and buckshot in the other, then I can decide which one I use by trigger selection.

  21. avatarjb says:

    Hi to all you Stoeger 20″ over & under shotgun owners. I just brought a stoeger condor outback in australia. It has 3 rails on the gun and a fiber optic red & green dot sight. I took the sight off and the top rail off and found I have a clearer shot down the line of the barrel just by useing the front green optic sight. I found it quicker to find the target and shoot at 15m > 30m with better results. If I am to use the optic sights can someone tell how to use them properly and how to sight them in; and are they worth it in the long run…
    Cheers.

  22. avatarsjk says:

    I’ll keep my Mossy 500 by the side of the bed thanks. As for the gentleman that is considering one of these over a Wingmaster, I’d reconsider.

  23. avatarRIGHT! says:

    To me it looks like something Airsoft would Mkt to Zombie Hunters but the so does the Mossberg Tactical 464 SPX Lever Action. It gives me the Heebie Jeebies when Mkting goes after a generation of FPSrs, wishing to swap out thier video guns for real ones

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      I have to admit, it has a bit of a “Road Warrier” feel to it, if you are familiar with Mel Gibson’s old Mad Max movies. I’ve owned it for a while now, and while I’m not 100% sold on the usefulness of the three rails, the ability to mount a flashlight is a good idea. Also, the gun is a hell of a lot of fun to shoot – something about a break-open that feels good.

  24. avatarRex Beaver says:

    Anyone had the same problem as I had with Stoeger side by side short barrel,
    when using 1oz slug in both barrels pulling the trigger first time both barrels fire at once boy what a kick.!!!!! ??

  25. avatarRuby Rose says:

    Hi
    were do I buy the knifes and hand grips for the stoeger

  26. avatarErrantVenture11 says:

    Note: My Condor has bona-fide ejectors (sends them soaring over my shoulder / into my face) and the safety does not reset after a reload. My friend’s Condor acts more like this one. Not sure why mine is different, but I like it.

  27. avatarLoz says:

    I’ve read your review a few times now and today I picked up my Stoeger!!
    Can hardly wait to shoot a few Roos (I’m in Australia) with it.
    Thanks for aiding my decision to buy this wicked little beast.

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