Different slings do different things — for a breakdown there’s this Ask Foghorn article about different types of slings. The single point sling was designed to allow the maximum range of movement for the shooter while still retaining the weapon, and while most single point slings do that beautifully there are some issues. Namely that they’re painful not only to your shoulder, but also to your wallet. Apex Defense has a new sling that they hope will address both of those issues, and they sent us one to try it out…

I’m not going to sit here and argue about the applicability of the single point sling for civilian shooters. Personally, I find it very useful for hunting and would imagine that it would work wonders in a tree stand. But as far as I’m concerned if you feel the need that’s enough justification for me. There are a great number of single point slings on the market right now from a number of manufacturers — Magpul, Blackhawk, etc… — and they all suffer from the double dip of pain that I mentioned a minute ago. Well, most of them. Let’s see how well Apex’s design stacks up.

I know, you’re transfixed by my rippling abs and bulging muscles. But try to stay focused, eh?

In terms of comfort, it does pretty well. The standard single point design is just a piece of seatbelt with some doodads on it, but Apex included a nice adjustable pad on their sling to keep it from cutting into your neck even with a heavy gun hanging off the front. The pad isn’t directly attached to the sling (it hangs on with some velcro loops), so you can move it around as needed or even just remove it completely if you want.

Even with the padding, the sling doesn’t really get in the way when shouldering the rifle. Slinging your rifle around moves it out of the way behind your neck, and even if it was still over there its slim enough to fit between your neck and the rifle without discomfort.

So, in other words, the sling performs better than average as a single point sling. It keeps the rifle on you while you’re doing other things, and does it comfortably. But then again, there are other slings that do this just about as well.

The biggest positive feature on the sling (for me) was the attachment point. Troy’s single point sling with shoulder pad sells for ~$36, but only includes a nylon loop for attaching it to the rifle. Blackhawk’s version uses some crappy looking split ring design that is cheap to produce and kept me worrying that I was about to impale it into the webbing in my hand. This, on the other hand, is a solid attachment device that looks and feels solid instead of cheap and doesn’t give me the willies.

What’s even better about this sling is that it quickly transforms from a single point sling to a two point sling, something that not every sling can do.

Apex Defense Multi-Point Tactical Sling With Shoulder Pad

Specifications:
MSRP:~ $25

Ratings (Out of Five Stars):
All ratings are relative to other similar guns, and the final score IS NOT calculated from the constituent scores.

Quality: * * *
The material does feel a little on the “meh” side, and the shoulder pad seems a tad skimpy. But it holds up well and does in fact work.

Ergonomics: * * * *
Works as well as any other single point sling, and the shoulder pad makes it that much better.

Overall Rating: * * * * 
Its cheaper than any comparable sling with similar features, has a better attachment point than most, and above all it works as advertised.

Apex Defense Multi-Point Tactical Sling With Shoulder Pad

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12 Responses to Gear Review: Apex Defense Multi-Point Tactical Sling With Shoulder Pad

  1. Thanks, Nick. I’m working on my first black rifle, and all articles of this type are going in the “for future reference” file.

    I’m not going to sit here and argue about the applicability of the single point sling for civilian shooters. … But as far as I’m concerned if you feel the need that’s enough justification for me.

    Funny how “because I can” is a good enough, even praised, reason for “why do you want that gun?” but when it comes to the accessories, somehow the bar has to be higher.

  2. If I’m walking with my AR, I use a Condor 2-point bungee sling, it’s sturdy, and converts into a reasonable single point. If I’m in a vehicle then I use a TAG single point bungee. I like the extra-wide shoulder strap and the quiet hook.
    I don’t like the exposed hook on the apex, in my experience they are too noisy and can scratch up the gun, no bueno.

  3. Right now you’re an YFWG, if you don’t start soon, you’ll become an OFWG, and I speak from experience. Nice article about the sling though!

  4. I’ve purchased a few and made many of my own, none of the current hooks/clips are perfect and I use only the HK hook or a sling loop.
    In my research I noted that SPS’s contribute to UDs far more that 2 points when running during the typical 2-3 gun shoot. The rifle bounces and the safety rubs against webbing becoming disengaged from the safe position. Also the muzzle always ends up planted firmly in the earth every time the shooter takes a knee with the long gun ‘free’. This is often not noticed in arid areas or ranges with paving/gravel but it is a common occurrence in damper climates. Try to remove packed soil from an M-4 muzzle device without orienting the firearm away from the target, fun it is not.

  5. I’ve purchased a few and made many of my own slings, none of the current hooks/clips are perfect and I use only the HK hook or a sling loop.
    In my research I noted that SPS’s contribute to UDs far more that 2 points when running during the typical 2-3 gun shoot. The rifle bounces and the safety rubs against webbing becoming disengaged from the safe position. Also the muzzle always ends up planted firmly in the earth every time the shooter takes a knee with the long gun ‘free’. This is often not noticed in arid areas or ranges with paving/gravel but it is a common occurrence in damper climates. Try to remove packed soil from an M-4 muzzle device without orienting the firearm away from the target, fun it is not, quickly achieved it is not.
    Running with a heavy bungi-slung carbine, Not recommended. The firearm, after it has bruised your man-things will either smash you in the face or trip you, just hope the safety has not been placed in the Fire position as well.
    The single point is at it’s best when manning a road block/traffic check point when one needs both hands free but the rifle at the ready, hanging vertically and a chest-center orientation.

  6. What brand is the single point sling mount on the rifle pictured? It is just about what I am looking for.

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