Gun Review: Gunwerks LR-1000 System

Regular readers will remember that I headed out to Wyoming to go meet up with the Gunwerks crew to attend their Long Range University. Part of the schooling means using only Gunwerks guns and gear for the range portion of class. While I’m sure this translates to sales for the Gunwerks team, the idea behind it is pretty simple: getting a mixed bag of students to reliably hit what they’re aiming at out to 900+ yards works best when you remove as many variables as possible. So what makes the Gunwerks guns so goshdarn good? Make the jump to find out . . .

I’ll get this right out there and say that if I had seven large to spend on a long-range rig, the Gunwerks LR-1000 system would be the ticket. Prior to going to LRU, my longest one shot hit was at a touch over 200 yards on an axis doe in early 2011. I did some shooting at steel at 500 yards last year as well, but it took me about six shots to get on target and I still zinged some high, low, left, and right. With the Gunwerks LR-1000 system, I recorded first shot hits at 400, 750, 880, and 950 yards. That alone says a tremendous amount for the system.

That type of accuracy and consistency is due to a blend of a lot of different factors but the most important (and obvious) is the precision machining and fitment that goes into every gun. Every part is hand-fitted, gauged, then double and triple checked before being taken to the range and test fired. It doesn’t matter whether its hot, cold, dirty, or clean, the Gunwerks LR-1000 put bullets very close together in the same place with boring regularity.


Any shooter worth their salt knows that the Achilles heel of a good shooting system is its optics system and Gunwerks delivers in spectacular fashion with the Nightforce 5.5-22 X 50. As Aaron mentioned in our interview, Gunwerks picked Nightforce due to the rigorous testing and quality control procedures that NF uses during the manufacturing process.

Gunwerks customers spend a lot of money to have a turnkey solution that works under any circumstances. I found the NXS based Gunwerks scope to be simply amazing. Controls were easy to use, intuitive and crisp. The optics were extremely clear and seemed to be unaffected by mirage under our test conditions which saw temps in the low 80’s and skies devoid of clouds.


The Gunwerks scope has two big selling features over the regular NXS scope. The first is the G7 reticle, which uncluttered and allows up to 10 MOA in wind hold. Additionally, at half power (11x), you can use the quick holdover marks on the vertical crosshair as a BDC reticle.

The second big feature is the custom ballistic turret that Gunwerks manufactures for the G7 scope. Given temperature, bullet BC, bullet type, muzzle velocity and altitude, Gunwerks can cut a custom turret that will allow you to dial your range directly on the scope. Operating outside of the stated conditions? Incorporate the G7-BR2 Rangefinder, load your ballistic data, and let the rangefinder give you the elevation correction and wind hold. That’s very cool, easy to use integration of products from the Gunwerks crew.

Part of the range portion at LRU included cranking up and down on the vertical adjustment and returning to zero. Of the ten or so guns used by the students during class, I observed zero failures over the duration of the two-day class. I’ll go ahead and hazard a guess that the G7 Nightforce has no problems holding and returning to zero.

I think that last part is what impressed me the most about the LR-1000 system. These class guns have thousands of rounds through them. They get bounced around, fiddled with and handled by lazy writers and still manage to make even the most mediocre shooter look like a pro. Normally, we’re hesitant to review a gun or scope without putting it through a real torture test. But my guess is that all the classes before me have done a good job of putting the LR-1000 system through the wringer. This is an absolutely reliable, robust shooting system that is built to put bullets on target in any condition all the time.

Specifications: Gunwerks LR-1000 System

  • Overall Length: 44.5 inches
  • Barrel Length: 24 inches
  • Overall Weight: 7.9 lbs (Stainless Steel Action)
  • Standard Trigger Pull: 2.5 lbs
  • Calibers
    • 6XC
    • 6.5-284 Norma
    • 7mm Rem Mag
    • 7mm LRM (tested)
    • 300 Win Mag
    • 300 RUM
  • MSRP: $6995

Ratings (out of five stars)

Accuracy: * * * * *
Accuracy was simply astounding. Gunwerks’ tagline is “1000 yards out of the box” and I found that to be 100% accurate. This system is stunning cold, hot, dirty, or clean.

Ergonomics * * * * *

Don’t let the pictures fool you. This is not your daddy’s Remington 700. The LR-1000 is a very comfortable piece of equipment to wield in the field. The stock has a wonderful finish, the bolt is easy to reach, and the stock comb is perfectly placed to give a good cheek weld while looking through that beautiful piece of glass.

Reliability * * * * *

My classmates and I found the LR-1000 system to be completely reliable during two days of range use. I have no reason to suspect that reliability would ever been an issue with this system.

Overall Rating * * * * *

These are the easiest five stars I’ve ever given. From fit and finish to the apparent thought that went into construction, this is a rifle that’s meant for the serious long range shooter and will provide a lifetime of accurate, reliable service. $7000 is a lot of money, but you get what you pay for – 1000 yards out of the box.

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About Tyler Kee

Tyler Kee is a small town kid trying to make it in the big city of Austin, TX. A salesman by day, he is an avid motorcyclist and aspiring chef out of the office.

52 Responses to Gun Review: Gunwerks LR-1000 System

  1. avatarmike marriam says:

    How does this setup compare to military sniper rifles?

    • avatarTyler Kee says:

      Don’t know, never laid eyes on one. However, it shares a lot of similarities like being based on the Rem 700 action, precision machined parts, and high end optics. The military could adopt this with ease I think.

    • avatarQajaqon says:

      There is only one way to give a comparison.

      Parallel existences.

      Gunwerks rifle systems are very good and reasonably priced for the material and workmanship that goes into each package. Gunwerks systems are created for a specific activity and environment and shooter.

      Military systems are that as well. A system for a specific activity and environment and shooter.

      They both can do each others ‘job’ very well. They both will live long and large in each others given activity: hitting a target, doing lethal damage, at a given/chosen distance, altitude and weather break, for the shooter.

      The rest is available to you from Gunwerks, openly, or from the given/chosen military branch with the appropriate enlistment/security clearance.

      Nous Defions

    • avatarPatrick Carrube says:

      Asking how this compares to a military sniper rifle is like asking how a Lexus LS460 compares to a racecar… what kind of racecar are we talking about here? We don’t know, the same as your “military sniper rifle”. Compared to the M24, the GW is obviously in a different class and it is intended to be. While the M24 is a very capable weapon system, the LR1000 has some advantages. Compared to the AIAW or even the Sako TRG, the LR1000 is comparable. If you take $2000-2200 off the price of the LR1000 for the cost of the scope and rings, then it is in the ballpark of other quality precision rifles.

  2. avatarJoe Grine says:

    Does the 7K include the optic, mounts, etc? Honestly, for that kind of dough, I’d rather buy a Blaser Tac II.

    • avatarTyler Kee says:

      It is the complete system. Scope, mounts, gun, barrel break in, and ballistic profile. Literally remove it from the box and shoot out to 1000 yards.

      • avatarQajaqon says:

        Set to Gunwerks’ ‘standard’. You, the owner/shooter, may have to ‘tweek’ it to your needs, or, not, as you may be of the same ‘standard’.

    • avatarQajaqon says:

      The Blaser Tactical 2 has a very good service record. The civilian version is comparable, but you will have to add/purchase other items and set them to a standard. This will bring a price/time tag a bit over that of some Gunwerks systems. Either one will do you well.

      Nous Defions

  3. avatarMatt in FL says:

    I’m going to add this to my “Gun Reviews” bookmark folder, even though this rifle is so far out of the realm of possibility for me in the foreseeable future that it might actually be further down the list “visit the moon.” However, the review still has some “things to look for” in less expensive equipment, so it’s worth keeping.

    In return, I’m going to edit your obviously mistyped first sentence for you, thusly:

    “Regular readers hate me with a jealous passion because I headed out to Wyoming to go meet up with the Gunwerks crew to attend their Long Range University.”

  4. avatarvirtualjohn says:

    Mark Thompson runs a long range shooting school over in Utah. It’s a two day school for $1500 for the first shooter and $1000 each for up to three more in a group. They use a Weatherby .30-338 with a Leupold scope, $3200 after course and $3900 without the course.
    One thing that got me in your first article about this Wyoming school, Tyler, was the put down of .30 caliber. Everyone has their bias’s, but I’m not sure if what I prefer makes what you prefer wrong. It terms of long range ballistics I prefer .30′s and would really like to get my hands on a .416 Barrett. As I understand Chris Barrett started with the best BC bullet he could design,then put a necked down sort of wildcat .50 BMG case behind it. After he had done that a German, Lutz Möller, built an even better bullet for the .416 Barrett.

    • avatarJoe Grine says:

      Ammo for the .416 Barrett runs about 6 bucks a round. Makes for a pretty expensive day at the range.

      • avatarvirtualjohn says:

        You’re right, Joe. Heck, even premium .300 Win mag is over $3 a round, .338 Win mag and .375 H&H are even more. 7 mm RUM is even more, Nosler premium at Cabela’s is regularly $79.99 a box. .338 Lapua Mag at Midway is $70 a box on up. Their Cor-Bon Performance Match in .338 Lapua is on sale at $94.99 a box, marked down from $124.99. Only thing; that’s out of stock. back-order only. That Weatherby .30-378 starts at $122.99 and goes up to $147.99
        Cost is a dang good reason to shoot mil-surp or Russian and/or in common calibers. Shooting high-power rifles, particularly with high-grade premium ammo is pricey. The thing is if you want to shoot game at 800 + yards the only ethical way calls for pricey equipment and ammo.
        Oh, I see I made a mistake in the post above; Thompson’s school shoots .30-378 Weatherby mags, not .30-338. My brain is not as smart as it wants me to think it is.

  5. avatarbrigo50 says:

    Tyler I am so jealous of you it is literally nauseating.
    Keep up the good work I loved this review. Long range shooting must be the climax of the shooting experience in general. Hitting a plate at 950….yoweee…

  6. avatarMike says:

    Looks like a private-labeled Stiller action (the left side flat where the name is engraved is a dead giveaway) and McMillan stock. I know, I have two Stillers and have seen numerous others, included private-labeled ones.

    Given that you can build an identically configured rifle for around $2,500-$3,000 ($1k for action, $350 for a good cut-rifled barrel like Krieger, Bartlein, Brux, Rock Creek, etc, $500 for McMillan hunter stock, $100-200 for bottom metal, $100-200 for trigger, rest for barrel fitting/bedding/misc. gunsmithing) from one of the many top gunsmiths in the country, and $1,800 for the Nightforce (in stock form), even if you add a premium for the custom reticle/turrets, that’s not a really good value proposition.

    • avatarPatrick Carrube says:

      @Mike – agreed 100%. This is nothing more than a “blank” Stiller action and McM stock. I too should know as I’m building a custom .260 Rem as I type this for my next F-class rifle. My total build (sans optics) is right under $2400 and will undoubtedly match the performance of the LR-1000. GW may make great rifles, but a $2500 markup is a bit much if you ask me as well! Also, I get to pick what color action I want and what stock I prefer (AIAX).

  7. avatarSkyler says:

    Looks like an amazing weapon and I wouldn’t mind having one if I had that kind of money lying around.

    But I’ve got to point out that every Marine for about a hundred years or so, has been shooting at 500 yards with iron sights and using the 5.56mm round since the late sixties. With a scope and a better caliber, such results should be pretty easy, no matter who makes the weapon.

    You don’t always need a scope, if you have good eyes. As I’ve aged, that’s been less the case and I’ve been enjoying my first scope.

  8. avatarJoseph says:

    For $7,000 dollars I can buy a Remington Model 700 in 30/06, topped by a Leupold 3X9x50, about 2000 rounds of Remington CorLokt 150 grain ammo, and have money left over to hire three call girls, two attorneys and a partridge in a pear tree. Not to mention some Jack Daniels Whiskey. I have BTW, dropped many bucks with that rifle/scope/ammo combo.

    None, I might add, at over 200 yards. My point? What’s the point in having a setup that can shoot out to 900/1000 yards? True sportmen don’t even think of taking a shot at that distance on a game animal. If you are hunting humans, you will be in the military and issued the weapon system you need. It was fun and informative I’m sure, but totally impractical for any real world purpose.

    • avatarJham says:

      Doesn’t sound like you’ve done much trophy hunting in the west where shots are routinely over 300 yards and not uncommon out to 5-600 yards. What’s not ethical is attempting these shot distances without the equipment to be able to do so. If you don’t have the equipment stay with your 200 yard distances.

    • avatarJham says:

      Doesn’t sound like you’ve done much trophy hunting in the west where shots are routinely over 300 yards and not uncommon out to 5-600 yards. What’s not ethical is attempting these shot distances without the equipment to be able to do so. If you don’t have the equipment stay with your 200 yard distances. I hunted with a buddy in Colorado who killed a deer at 445yds and I have taken them at nearly 500 yds. The terrain is flat and open and getting closer is often out of the question.

    • avatarJham says:

      Doesn’t sound like you’ve done much trophy hunting in the west where shots are routinely over 300 yards and not uncommon out to 5-600 yards. What’s not ethical is attempting these shot distances without the equipment to be able to do so. If you don’t have the equipment stay with your 200 yard distances. I hunted with a buddy in Colorado who killed a deer at 445yds and I have taken them at nearly 500 yards. The terrain is flat and open and getting closer is often out of the question.

  9. avatarJoseph says:

    Totally fun and informative no doubt. And ridiculously expensive and absolutely useless in the real world. Unless you take shots at game animals at over 250-300 yards at most, which true sportsmen won’t do.If you’re shooting at people, the military will supply all the hardware you need. A magnificent waste of time and money….but a blast I’m sure if you have m0ney to burn.

    • avatarPatrick Carrube says:

      @Joseph – I’m not sure if you’ve noticed or not, but not every rifle is used for hunting or military sniping. F-Class, Benchrest, and F-T/R shooting has exploded in popularity over the past decade. This is just another weapon system that will allow those shooters (myself included) to participate in those types of events.

      I don’t know of many hunters that spend thousands of dollars on hunting rifles (African Dangerous Game hunters excluded here!). Those who live in the states rarely take shots at game longer than 300 yards. Those that do have to practice regularly, understand ballistics and their ballistic profile, can read wind, have optimal shooting conditions, and a bit of luck on their side (assuming that the animal isn’t going to turn at the last moment). Those hunters that don’t practice reguarly or know what their doing usually miss their target by yards, not inches anyways.

      • avatarAccur81 says:

        The LR-1000 seems to me to be a moderate value piece. Many shooters lack the expertise to effectively develop a 1000 yard platform without either assistance or trial and error. Gunwerks has obviously put some serious R&D into their platform. If you combine the components working together in harmony, they are already using some of the top performers in the field with the G7 rangefinder, Berger VLD bullets, and modified NightForce scopes.

        If you’re already a long range whiz, you can definitely tool up for less. If you’ve never heard of spin drift, then you’d best either do a lot of research or buy this sucker out of the box.

        I think it’s pretty cool to have either option.

        (I don’t have $10 K for toy money, so it’s a modified Remington 700 / US Optics / Burris XTR, and Hornady Superperformance and ballistic programs set up for me. I’m stuck with my pet .530 BC .308 loads, so I couldn’t keep up with the Berger 7mm .617 BC ammo – but a good .416 Barrett load could definitely top the Gunwerks set up. Pretty tough to carry a .416 though. )

  10. avatarBryce says:

    I’m familiar with gunwerks and have held their products on several occasions. My father did a big horn sheep hunt with a guide associated and featured on their program regularly. He took a gorgeous ram at 550 Yards. The first shot taken was at 1100 yards with this rifle, unfortunately or fortunately the guide forget to correct for wind and the round pass just in front of the Ram nose. This was before gunwerks split from Best of the West.
    The system is solid, has proven results. For someone who’s coming into long range shooting and doesn’t want to spend years researching what to buy, learning to reload their own precision ammo and going through the long process of developing a precious shooting system this is a great option. Oh, and you have $7K lying around. If you’re the type who would rather pay a guide to take you on a hunt than buy your own gear and do it yourself this is a great option. If you’re more the type who enjoys the journey of learning and building your own system there are definitely equal or superior options available at lower cost. Personally, I’d never spend $7k on this system, not that it’s not worth it because it’s quality but because I’m into long range shooting and for me this system takes the fun out of it. There is also a bit of premium attached to this system. I’d spend $2-4K on a GA Precision or Dakota Arms rifle, top it with Nightforce Optics & mount and you’ve got a much sexier rifle with unsurpassed performance and an accuracy gurantee of 1/2″ MOA, 3/8″ MOA etc. What you don’t get is the ability to pull the rifle out of the box with the included ammo and turrets and go shoot long range. You’ll have to work up a load, or buy match ammo, use a ballistics calculator and spend some time at the range but that’s the fun part.
    I shoot a factory Rem 700 XCR Tactical Long Range 300 Win Mag, Nightforece NXS 5.5 – 22 x 56, NF one piece 20 moa base and I shoot steel at 1000 yards all day long and have gone out to nearly a mile. It’s not a Gunwerks rifle or GA Precision but I’m also in it less than $3k w/ optics.

    For my money I’d buy a Dakota Arms, GA precision or a host of other fully custom options. If you’re leaving on a hunt in a month or two and dont’ have the time for all the work up, Gunwerks is stellar.

  11. avatarJames Bridges says:

    I went to Gunwerks shooting to school in May of 2011 and bought a rifle from them
    before I got there. I shot a friends rifle one day and had to have one. This is absolutely the best rifle I have shot to date. My personal opinion, this gun is not made for that individual that loves to shoot 1 to 2 hundred rounds at the shooting range on a weekend. This is a hunting rifle for people to hunt with and have for a life time and pass down to their kids if they want to.There are a lot of people me included that do not have a lot of places to shoot past 200 yards anytime. I do a lot of hunting in New Mexico where I can air a bullet out if I want to. Last year with the Gunwerks LR1200 in 7mm Rem Mag I took two animals at distances that I never felt comfortable at before. A antelope at 410 yards and a mule deer at 663 with one shot. It cost a lot of money these days to hunt and not to be able to shoot an animal because you don’t have confidence in your setup. To me that is just stupid. This gun rocks at long-range. I get tired of seeing on these post about what companies charge for guns, triggers, barrels, etc. No one said you have to buy it. Gunwerks is a great company. Aaron and Mike are very knowledgable of what they do. I will continue to do business with them in the future. Keep up the good work Gunwerks.

  12. Give a good shooter a Remington 700 or a Savage 10 for $600-700 and a $300-400 scope and he will do the same shots at 400-900 yard shots they do with a 6995.00 rifle. That is a lot of money to put holes in paper.

      • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

        I own two rem sendero, two savage 111 long range, and two gunwerks rifles. Believe me , they will not do the half min groups that the gunwerks rifles do consistantly. But I do agree that you don’t need to spend the $ on a half min rifle to be happy.

      • avatarDebo says:

        Paul, Thank you, and maybe I will take you up on your offer, “After” the Holidays. (But not sure how to contact you) Yes I am “not” knocking the rifle, Just the Price… If I had tons of money to throw away, I might even buy one with the $6000.+ Zeiss “All-in-one” Scope, But I don’t have $12,000 to blow on a gun when I haven’t even made that much this entire year… Ken, I’m interested in your 300 rum build, Let me know how it turns out and how much it cost without scope, as I most likely will be using a B-E-3 Scope. Hope you all had a Happy Thanksgiving…

        • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

          Debo, you can conact me thru this site. What is your budget for a rifle without a scope.
          Have a great happy holidays.

        • avatarDebo says:

          It’s depending on how cheap I can get the B-E-3 for I guess, and how much my friends rase for me. (Bake-sales, yard-sales… Etc…) But I’m guessing between $1,000 and $1,500 for the gun complete with “Muzzle-brakes and Limbsaver” and tuned up. I have someone working on getting into the shot show and he will try to get a demo B-E-3 cheap for me… As well as light a fire under some of the other scope makers butts, to get them out of the stone age, to make “All-in-one” Scopes as well… I don’t have a “Rangefinder” or B-C, Or Wind meter… (And I’m not going to buy them) So, I’m going to get a scope that has it all built in so I only have to learn how to use “ONE” thing… ;-) I’m not sure what the difference is as far as performance per “dollar”, but I think I might go with the 300WM in-stead of the 300rum… No one around here has them instock to compare prices… My friend is going to the next gun-show and will get some prices for me to see if there is a “BIG” difference or just a little difference in price… Won’t do me any good to have a gun I can’t afford to practice with… IE: I almost bought a Remington 700 in 7mmUltra-Mag until I found out that a 20rd box here is over $60.00 a box! So saving $300.00 on the gun wasn’t a good deal as I can get the 300WM for less than $30.00 a box and it has more knockdown power than the 7mm at 500+ yards… :o)) I hope to be able to afford to shoot around one box a month until hunting season then I will get 2 boxes to practice with… I just got off the phone, and have a friend that told me that, he would be willing to transfer a $25,000 **Ambassador** “Lifetime Membership” to “Frontsight” Training Academy, to anyone that would be willing to trade for a New completed gun for me, if you or anyone else is interested in training and shooting with the best… He doesn’t hunt but likes my Venison dish’s… Check it out, there will be new training areas all over the country to make it easy to go to… But for now they only have two, one here near LasVegas, and who doesn’t want to come to Vegas?? Let me know… ;o))

        • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

          Sounds like you have so good friends Debo. Hey Debo, if you have a chance, look up the ballistics of the 7mm rem mag shooting 168 grn vld berger bullets. Thats all I shoot for long range. Thet cal is .284 and is the flattest shooting cal out their for hunting big game. I have taken deer at almost 1400 yards with it. And they are easy to load and buy.

  13. avatarCRaTXn says:

    The rule of thumb is 50% cost of goods sold & 50% labor and profit. If you were to assign say $10/hr to your personal time for: barrel break-in, trial and error load work-up(don’t forget all the components you will buy that won’t shoot and will set on your bench catching dust and reminding you of your frustration for years), trips back and forth to a long range shooting range(fuel now $4/gal), BC validation, trips to the gunsmith, UPS store trips and charges and Hazmat fees, FFL pick-up plus fees, optics mating, assorted wrong height rings, 10MOA vs 20MOA bases adjustments, changing the cheap base and ring screws, gunsmith for blue printing, trigger job or replacement, bedding tuning, recrowning, custom barrel/fluting/chambering, throat geometry, feeding ramp polishing, custom one piece bolt, firing pin protrusion adjustment, rifle balancing, anti rust coatings, custom stock work for LOP/drop @ comb/cost of fuel for all those trips (fuel may have gone > $4/gal), missed errands/dates with wife/girlfriend (lost sex) from pissin em off with your obsession, lost hunting trip exps from wounding or missing that once a year hunt or once a life safari, mental anguish-frustration for mistakes along the way…Gunwerks’ timeline and cost might be a welcome alternative. The difference of the tuned synergy of the G7-LR1000 and my cobbled together system equals a miss…the knowledge base to rise to the level of the ex Special Forces/SWAT snipers-competitive shooters and instructors comes at the cost of hundreds of man-hours of study and approx 6-7 or more pounds of gear…I’m saving my coins for one of these as soon as the Regime is out of office.

  14. HI. HAVE ONE. DOES WHAT THEY SAY…END OF STORY.

  15. avatarTribble says:

    Having a Verdict built in 338 Norma now. Started process on Aug 27th. Will post after I get the gun.

  16. avatarjimmyjames says:

    Shooting systems or at least caliber and load specific scopes seem to be the wave of the (near) future. Just got a Nikon M308. Got it mounted and my”system” zeroed. Now I just need a 1000yd range to play on. Two being developed in my area. Hurry up guys.

  17. avatarJoseph DiMercurio says:

    I’m interested.

  18. avatarPaul F. Taylor says:

    I had two rifles built by Gunwerks. Both in 7mm Mag. They are in the magnus style but I changed them up alittle. I had them put carbon barrels on both and their new muzzle brakes. They shoot just like they advertise. I love them. I had them put PFT SPECIAL on both of them. They scored hits all the way out to 1400 yards. I also bought the 700 rem Sendaro that Mike turned into a long range shooter on TV. It also shoots great.

  19. avatarDebo says:

    I’m just wondering, Since this is 2013, and not 1960′s, why can’t they make scopes with everything built in???? So you don’t have to carry Wind meters, Ballistic Calculators, and Range finders, pack mule, because if you forget one in the truck and hike 12 miles up the mountain and see a Monster Buck at…Ooops dropped the range finder or forgot it in the truck…. Your screwed!! They have been making range finders since at least the 60′s Scopes since before the 30′s, These should have been made all together since at least the early 70′s!! They would be around $200. now if they did!! I’ve been hunting back east where it’s shotgun only and never needed a long range rifle as my Shotgun is good to 150+ yards. I’m now out in NV and looking for a long range Gun, but I’m not spending that much for a incomplete system thats in “pieces”.. No way I’m spending $5000 for a gun that doesn’t have everything all together to shoot it… You have to go out and get there G7 range finder for another $1500?? How Stupid!! Without it, the guns worthless over 100 yards (or what you can come close at guessing!!) They should put the g7 into the scope!! I’m looking at the “Way overpriced” Burris Eliminator 3 that has windage, Ballistic calculator, and Range-finder out to 1200yards… I want everything together!!! If I have my gun then I will have everything I need to take a long shot!! I won’t have to carry 4-5 extra pounds of stuff that if you loose one piece or forget something, that will end your hunt… Just looking for a sub moa 300-win-mag gun out of the box to put the Burris or another “All” in one scope on… Any suggestions? I just can’t believe that with all these “Braindead” scope makers out there, I only found 2 all in one scopes!! No competition is why they are “Way-Way-Way-Over-Priced!!” Everyone should demand them and the prices will come down! If cars evolved like these scopes, we would all be still using “Hand-Cranks” to start our cars!! Just my two cents…

    • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

      I think you are looking to bypass all the fun of learning the art of shooting long range. It’s fun to learn how to judge wind and MOA judging at any range. I shoot long range all the time and if it was as simple as just buying a scope that did all the the work, I would not do it with the pride and feeling of success that it brings.

      • avatarDebo says:

        You don’t get it… I’m not missing anything… So, you’re telling me you drive a Model-A Ford “All” the time because it fun to crank it when it’s 20-below-zero?? And it has no power-stering power brakes because of the “Art” of driving that rig???? I Bet you don’t!! I just want to put “FOOD” on the table!! I don’t care if it’s a Buck or a doe, as long as it goes on the table!! Yes, its fun to go to the range and have fun shooting long range for “Fun”!! But when it comes to “HUNTING”, “FUN&GAMES” are over!! It’s all about feeding my family! And Not everyone has the “Luxury” of spending $20,000 dollars on a gun-system!! There should be a “Bunch” of “ALL-IN-ONE” 1000-yard gun-systems out there for under $2000.00 dollars!! That’s my two-cents…

        • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

          Wow Debo. You sound like you may be hurting in the food department more than most of us. If I had to worry about getting a doe to put on the table just so my family could eat, I think my thoughts would not be with anything to fancy in the gun department. Just shoot a one minute per angle rifle and get closer. Good luck and God Bless.

    • avatarken says:

      debo you don’t need all the stuff get a gun practice practice practice. just for putting meat on the table one gun is all you need. learn your gun and you can be very efficient out to say 500 yards or more just shoot the one gun. you want to learn long range shooting spend the money and enjoy. I have hit steel targets consistently with my factory Remington 223 Winchester 270 and Remington 300 mag. the 270 and 300 don’t miss out to 400 yards

      • avatarDebo says:

        Ya, Ken, but you still need a “Rangefinder” **BUILT-IN** so you know where to put the cross-hairs… Because it makes a big difference if it’s 483 or 620 yards if you can’t know for a fact which one it is!! (and out here it’s very difficult to know for sure! Especially at my age…) As for “Getting closer “Paul” out here you can’t get closer 99.999% of the time! (Not many areas out here have “Trees”!!) That’s why they call it the Desert… It’s all 1-2ft high brush spread out… Average shot where he hunts is 550-750 yards but he has taken them out to over 825yards. And “Yes” Paul, I have to support my Grand-kids now because of this idiot in office!! I’m only working 6-15 hours a week now if at all, and supporting 7 people!! So, we do need the food!! We will be practicing at 300-500-700- and 1000 yards and maybe more… I’m most likely going to borrow money to get the Buris-Elem-3 Scope and I’m not sure on the gun yet. I’m Looking at Rem-700 SL-2, Savage Long-range-Hunter, or T/Center so far. But still looking… Trying to get everything under $2,500. Dollars, including a super-muzzle-break and tune it up to be MOA or less at 200+ and a Limbsaver-pad to reduce the recoil to the bolt in my shoulder… Any suggestions?? Also Ken, I would like to know where you hunt here in NV? If your near LasVegas maybe we can go to the range sometime?

        • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

          Debo, do you live in NV? I live in AZ, Tucson to be exact. I teach longe range shooting here. I would be willing to help you learn to do this if you want. I would suggest buying a 7mm Mag in the Rem sendero model, then put a $ 180.00 muzzle brake on it that will reduce at least 45% of recoil. Then look at a Huskamaw 5-20 rifle scope. They will burn the turrets free and you will be accurate out to at least 950 yards. I know because I have two of them. As far as a range finder goes I have a older $1500.00 range finder that is bigger than I will use anymore and I will let you have it CHEAP. Let me know if this helps.

  20. avatarDennis Hardin says:

    I dream of a gun like this. For the average guy raising a family, ect., it is out there. Although these guns are more than fabulous, I have shot a moose at 500 yards and an antelope at 422 yards with a Browning auto in 7mm with off the shelf ammo dressed with a ported muzzle break to hold down harmonics. A range finder, calm weather and adjustable scope did the job, but with all the compensation these guns can offer, a shooter is in a whole different class, not waiting for the “right” situation. I am envious of those of you who have one. Smile while you shoot!

    • avatarPAUL F. TAYLOR says:

      You have class. At least you are not knocking the rifle because at this time in your life you don’t have one yet. I think one will be in your hands at some point. Positive things happen to positive people. I bought one two years ago and love it.

  21. avatarken says:

    these are excellent rifles. I had a chance to shoot one in the 7mm lrm and it was incredible. we where shooting 500,700, and 1000 yards with it. recoil wasn’t bad, no break on it, accuracy was great. then the owner was surprised when I brought out a factory 300win mag 3x9x50 leopold scope and hit shot for shot at the same range, although he did group better . currently building a 300 rum with nightforce scope about 3000.00 though ill show him accuracy lol I hope. took a cow elk last year at 700 yards one shot here in Nevada its nothing to be shooting 400 yards

  22. Pingback: Gun Review: Gunwerks LR-1000 System | The Truth About Guns | Sport Field Hunting Outdoors

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