I’m on vacation. Obviously. Flying down to West Palm via Washington, D.C. I met a prominent conservative TV personality who shall remain nameless. He mentioned Emily Miller’s Washington Times series on exercising her Second Amendment rights in the nation’s capital. “Registering guns is crazy,” he said, dissing and dismissing the registration requirements stipulated by the the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975. “None of my guns are registered.” My reply to the conservative curmudgeon was straight to the point: “You shouldn’t say that to anyone.” He didn’t miss a beat. “They can take them from my cold, dead hands,” he asserted, [not-so-originally] channeling his inner Heston. Sigh. Gun owners should obey all firearms laws no matter how non-sensical (e.g., Massachusetts’ high cap mag limit). And if you don’t, don’t tell anyone. Ever. Under any circumstances. You could lose your gun rights and all legal gun owners will suffer by association. Know what I mean?

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59 Responses to Self-Defense Tip of the Day: STFU

  1. There will always be people who say stupid things, and the only way they will learn is when they are arrested and lose their gun and other rights forever. This guy better hope he doesn’t get caught because he’ll be spending a ton of money defending his big mouth.

  2. openly admitting to breaking the laws where you live is a pretty bad idea. This is especially true for residents of the district. one of the major strengths of 2A advocates are our law abiding nature, given the tools owned by us. either, move or abide by the laws where you live. breaking the law just because you don’t agree with it give ammo to Brady/McCarthy types.

  3. The statement that “all legal gun owners will suffer by association” is like saying that we’re all guilty because some psycho shot Gabby Giffords.

    I don’t feel shame because someone else does something wrong. I leave it to the Brady wingnuts to try to tar me with that brush. And guess what? It ain’t working.

    Please, people, stop looking for the boogeyman under the bed. He isn’t there.

    • The statement that “all legal gun owners will suffer by association” is like saying that we’re all guilty because some psycho shot Gabby Giffords.

      Good point; but we ain’t psychos right? We are, on the other hand, law abiding gun owners. Unfortunately, you cannot continue to say that if you don’t follow the law; you cannot wave the Second Amendment around and state “Don’t violate this!” while quoting “pay no attention to the man behind the curtain” when it comes to your own conduct.

      I wholeheartedly agree with RF here. Follow the law and if you’re bulletproof enough to think you can’t be caught or prosecuted for violating said law, no matter how little you agree with it, don’t advertise yourself.

      But then again, maybe we need a couple of Martin Sheen’s. Who want to go first?

    • I don’t know, Ralph. It’s not that I feel shame about poor Rep. Gifford’s shooting or the comments of the wing nut Robert met, it’s that I feel any of those things has the potential to hurt our cause amongst the general population who may still be forming opinions about guns, not the avowed anti-gun crowd. I perceive that, as responsible CCWers and firearms instructors (like you & me), we have a “act-responsibly code” by which we live. The actions of certain callous law breakers can hurt our standing if the thing we DO have in common with them is guns.

      Robert, two things: First, enjoy your vacation and remember to use sunscreen! Second, while I certainly wish the law were different, I do think you could employ a little “TTAG-magazines in MA.” As you know, some high-capacity magazines are allowed, as long as they are pre-ban. So, many Glock, Beretta, AR-15, legal, high-capacity magazines are available, but certainly not for all firearms. I know that’s your point, but full disclosure doesn’t hurt.

      • those things has the potential to hurt our cause

        Everything has the potential to hurt “our cause.” Whether Elena Kagan has her period on the day she hears a gun case, or whether the Democrats take back the House, or, well, list as many potential problems as you want. There’s really no end to them.

        But I’m supposed to worry about what some a$$hole does because he has a gun? I gotta call BS on that one. The bottom line is — each of us needs to worry about ourselves and stop feeling guilty about our guns. The collective “we” does not break laws. Criminals break laws and the guilt is personal and singular.

        As long as we’re busy playing Chicken Little, the Brady’s are winning.

      • some high-capacity magazines are allowed, as long as they are pre-ban.

        Be careful with this, LeftShooter. High-cap “feeding devices” must have been legally owned in the Commonwealth prior to the AWB. If they were subsequently brought in from out of state, they’re illegal no matter when they were made.

  4. Well, if he lives in Florida he doesn’t have to register his guns, thankfully we don’t have any such asinine requirement here.

  5. I definitely agree with the need to STFU and the need for gun owners to obey the law. If a certain state has laws that you disagree with stay out of that state, and if you live in such a state then decide to move to a new state, or motivate your fellow citizens to change the laws. Having lived on the left coast for close to 20 years we finally moved to a more conservative, gun friendly, lower taxing state.
    But even in the conservative state we reside in, we see liberal’s trying to rear their head, testing the waters, seeing what they can get away with. We have to remain vigilant as there are only so many states to move to.

  6. I agree, good idea to keep one’s yap shut about gun-related legalities.

    However, in opposition to some posts above, I disagree that we have to worry about popular support. Numbers certainly help, of course, but popular support isn’t everything. I know it’s a different time and different circumstances, but the Revolutionary War was won with only a third of the American population supporting it. Oftentimes, it’s not about how many malleable drones you have, but rather the conviction, confidence, strategy, and persistence with which you fight the battle.

    We’ve seen horrible regulations go into effect because of a vocal minority that weak-kneed politicians and sheep-like voters failed to stand up to. We just have to turn that around.

    • +1

      When I was a little kid, when my grandmother didn’t like the way I dressed, she’d ask me “what will the neighbors think?”

      I would never use bad language around grandma, my what I was thinking was “who gives a f^ck what they think? They hate us anyway.”

  7. Wait a minute! Who’s to say that his “unregistered” guns are illegal? NONE of my guns are “registered.” AND, I’m perfectly legal (of course). Not only am I not required to register them… there’s not even a mechanism by which I COULD register them, even if I “wanted to.”

    Does the “TV guy” live in DC? Or West Palm? Or somewhere else? If someone asked me if my guns were “registered,” I’d truthfully (and legally in the right) answer, “OF COURSE NOT!”

    I don’t like it when folks misbehave with guns. I don’t like it when people misbehave with cars. But, I’m not ashamed of being a car owner, nor do I vicariously assume some twisted sense of responsibility for bad or reckless drivers. Same goes for guns. “Eez no my prahblem.”

    • I can’t, off-hand, think of a well-known conservative commentator who lives in DC (or MA). One actually lives in NH, two others actually live in Palm Beach (not West Palm Beach) and three live in Virginia. Whose left? No registration involved in those places.

        • Curious. Perhaps I should broaden my notion of “well-known conservative TV commentators”? Some of Fox’s key staff, featured commentators, live within the district. Two come to mind, but I think of them as moderates. I have an acquaintance who lived for many decades on Foxhall Road in DC: He had a pistol range installed in his enormous basement long ago (mid 80’s). Some people, especially some of the Cave Dwellers (not pejorative, a local term) just do what they want. There are also many ‘grandfathered’ guns in DC. The owners often take the position that nothing need be done with them so long as they aren’t moved. Nobody talks in that world unless they know they are safe doing so. That’s my experience, at any rate. Enjoy your vacation. Palm Beach: Rush’s hometown these days. Nice place.

  8. What if nationwide registration became law, or limits on the number of firearms owned became law, or how about if an outright ban became law… should we follow all those laws too? We gain nothing by meekly accepting the whittling away of our freedoms. We should be rallying around those individuals being prosecuted on spurious gun charges, not sneering at them that they should have been following the law and now are making “the rest of us” look bad. Freedom could reign and we’d have nothing to fear from the “LAW” if we, as a gun-rights community, stood together and refused to follow any “laws” that encroach upon our true liberty!

    • “What if nationwide registration became law, or limits on the number of firearms owned became law, or how about if an outright ban became law… should we follow all those laws too? ” What if, indeed. You’re a free man, let your conscience be your guide. You pay your money and you take your chances. If you’re going to break the law, for whatever reason, right or wrong, good or bad, it’s probably not a real good idea to advertise the fact.

      “We gain nothing by meekly accepting the whittling away of our freedoms. We should be rallying around those individuals being prosecuted on spurious gun charges, not sneering at them that they should have been following the law and now are making “the rest of us” look bad.”

      You’re absolutely right Henry. As far as I’m concerned, “shall not be infringed” means just that and in unity there is strength. The problem lies, however, where principle meets reality and the full force of the law.

      An example that comes readily to mind was the NFA case against David Olson. The case received modest attention in the MSM and kindled a smallish fire under the blogosphere. I’d bet that there was also some letter writing to Editors and Legislators going on. I don’t recall a phalanx of citizens armed with pitchforks, shotguns and EBR’s at the court house when they whisked the hapless Mr. Olson off to Federal Prison.

      You pointed out; “Freedom could reign and we’d have nothing to fear from the “LAW” if we, as a gun-rights community, stood together and refused to follow any “laws” that encroach upon our true liberty!”. Well, maybe. It’s a good theory anyway. Though that would be kind of like herding cats in a storm of lipstick smeared flying pigs, and just about as likely to happen. Human nature is funny like that. Good luck.

      Standing up for principle, against the Authorities and popular sentiment, can be a difficult and often bloody proposition. Will the first ten volunteers please step forward and storm the Gates of Mordor?…….I SAID!!, Will the first ten volunteers please step forward and storm the Gates of Mordor?

      For some little understood reason, most people are reluctant to voluntarily step into a buzz saw when they themselves are not being directly threatened or provoked, even when they know full well that it’s only a matter of time before they themselves will be brought before the Tribunal, or the Inquisition, or have their door kicked in in the middle of the night by mean, nasty people of a different political/philosophical stripe, to be carted off to the work camps and the re-education centers. History provides countless examples. Go figure.

      I enjoyed Unintended Consequences by John Ross just as much, and probably more, than the next guy. I’m also anxiously awaiting the publishing of Absolved by Mike Vanderboegh. It’s very entertaining fiction. If and when the revolution comes, I’ll try my best to protect my family and to do my part. Until then, I’ll try to do other things that are within the current law and that I hope will prove to be helpful, in some way or other, to the cause of liberty, justice, truth, rationality and the scientific method.

      My Dad counseled and cautioned me to pick my fights very carefully and with great reflection. Of course, he was absolutely right. I wish that I could say that all of my decisions were based on his imparted wisdom. Alas, I would have a few less scars had I been a little more mindful of his words. Sometimes the price of tuition at the University of Hard Knocks can be frighteningly steep, but the lessons learned there are very often invaluable, if one proves to be a good student and one manages to survive the experience.

      Right now, it seems that working within the law is paying dividends. We’ve come a surprisingly long way since the very dark days of 1994. We will continue to press on and make progress. We will experience set backs. We will learn from them and make adjustments to our strategy and our tactics and we will again press on from there. I have faith that we will carry the day…..eventually…..maybe……I sure hope so anyway……because it would probably really stink if we didn’t.

      I’m not wearing rose colored glasses nor am I ready to pop the champagne just yet. We’re living in very interesting and dangerous times. Any number of all too plausible events, predictable or Black Swan, could change our happy little day to day lives drastically, and not for the better. In the mean time, stand up for what you believe in, keep your wits about you, keep your eyes and ears open, spread the word, keep your powder dry, don’t do anything that you may deeply regret later, pick your friends carefully and never expect anyone to watch your back or be there for you when you need them most (it avoids disappointment).

      • Right now, it seems that working within the law is paying dividends.

        Bravo, Greg. We are winning because we’re working within the law.

        • So far, so good. Of course and unfortunately, all of the good, hard work that we’ve done so far could come undone in a heartbeat. But until then it would be best to stay the course that we’ve set; stay focused, vigilant and resolute.

  9. I agree- if you’re planning to break a law, however dumb, I don’t want to hear about it.

    And for the record, all my guns are legally registered.

    Oh, wait– no they’re not. They’re *illegally* registered, because in PA it’s illegal for any government organization to keep a firearm registry. But the State Police do it anyway.

    • “They’re *illegally* registered, because in PA it’s illegal for any government organization to keep a firearm registry. But the State Police do it anyway.”

      Then do the smart thing – SUE. Sure, you might not have a lot of money, but I’m sure you could gather plenty of people who would donate to fund the lawsuit.

      • Been done. Didn’t succeed. Major logic and language-comprehension failure on the part of the PA Supreme Court.

  10. I’m a hard-core liberal and have grown to love firearms in my not-so old age.

    The politicization of guns is detrimental to us all. Obey the law, register your weapon, if needed. The Second Amendment can only be overturned by the Constitutional process.

    “And if you don’t, don’t tell anyone” is bargaining from a place of weakness. And kind of sad.

    Remain vigilant, but remember there are more gun owners than there are folks in place to take them away.

    • You can’t be a hardcore liberal if you changed your mind about something- that means that you started thinking about something, and once you think about something, then you start thinking about something else… and before you know it, you’ll be thinking for yourself on everything- and you can’t do that and still be a liberal!

      • You know, liberals say the exact same thing about conservatives and it’s trite no matter which direction it’s coming from.

  11. I don’t live where I’m required to register a gun and I never will register one. No matter what laws they write, I will not let anyone find a weapon in my possession that needs to be registered.

    I am a free man and intend to stay that way.

    • In MA, all guns are registered. And if the government is as efficient at cataloging guns as it is at everything else, I don’t have a lot to worry about.

      • A friend of mine quips “I’m not afraid of the government knowing. I’m afraid of the NSA knowing.” Whoops. Now I’ve done it…. Obeying the law is fundamental. Except for Johnson, Nixon, Clinton and so forth. But it’s tough at the top. Laugh.

      • MOST guns are registered in MA. Not all. From the ’80’s on that’s probably true. Prior to that time probably not so much. I’d bet that there is a not insignificant number of firearms in the Commonwealth, that because of their age, and the circumstance of ownership, that are paperless.

  12. Just a reminder to everyone who thinks their guns are not registered. If you got it from a FFL, or gave it to one for repairs, chances are it is registered. The ATF’s eTrace system (available to possibly 120 foreign nations) contains FFL’s bound books and all new gun purchases are entered in to it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ETrace

  13. If your gun is fairly modern, it probably is registered in one way or another.
    Even paperless FTF, a few phone calls would allow BATF or FBI to follow up.
    Indiana does not require gun registration, but new gun sales are registered by the FFL.

  14. I agree that everyone should obey the law, but the silly old men who gave us the 2A loved to break any law they didn’t like. Then when the foolish king sent his court jesters to enforce his laws we kicked his ass, but now we bow down to a new king and we’re all screwed.

  15. Good advice for the hidden criminals among you. It’s funny how the STFU is the same advice given to gun owners who commit murder and want to pawn it off as defensive.

    Great job, Robert.

    • There you go again Mikey, flailing away with your broad brush and missing the underlying context and premise completely. So very progressive of you.

      Try this one on for size, Sport. Just so you know, I agree with what follows completely, to my very core, and I’m not the only one. Please note that the following is from 1979 and that some of the assertions Abbey made are no longer valid (ie. the right to arms in the UK). The last two paragraphs are particularly poignant.

      The Right to Arms (from the book entitled Abbey’s Road, © 1979)
      Edward Abbey
      If guns are outlawed
      Only outlaws will have guns
      (True? False? Maybe?)
      Meaning weapons. The right to own, keep, and bear arms. A sword and a lance, or a bow and a quiverful of arrows. A crossbow and darts. Or in our time, a rifle and a handgun and a cache of ammunition. Firearms.
      In medieval England a peasant caught with a sword in his possession would be strung up on a gibbet and left there for the crows. Swords were for gentlemen only. (Gentlemen!) Only members of the ruling class were entitled to own and bear weapons. For obvious reasons. Even bows and arrows were outlawed–see Robin Hood. When the peasants attempted to rebel, as they did in England and Germany and other European countries from time to time, they had to fight with sickles, bog hoes, clubs–no match for the sword-wielding armored cavalry of the nobility.

      In Nazi Germany the possession of firearms by a private citizen of the Third Reich was considered a crime against the state; the statutory penalty was death–by hanging. Or beheading. In the Soviet Union, as in Czarist Russia, the manufacture, distribution, and ownership of firearms have always been monopolies of the state, strictly controlled and supervised. Any unauthorized citizen found with guns in his home by the OGPU or the KGB is automatically suspected of subversive intentions and subject to severe penalties. Except for the landowning aristocracy, who alone among the population were allowed the privilege of owning firearms, for only they were privileged to hunt, the ownership of weapons never did become a widespread tradition in Russia. And Russia has always been an autocracy–or at best, as today, an oligarchy.

      In Uganda, Brazil, Iran, Paraguay, South Africa–wherever a few rule many–the possession of weapons is restricted to the ruling class and to their supporting apparatus: the military, the police, the secret police. In Chile and Argentina at this very hour men and women are being tortured by the most up-to-date CIA methods in the effort to force them to reveal the location of their hidden weapons. Their guns, their rifles. Their arms. And we can be certain that the Communist masters of modern China will never pass out firearms to their 800 million subjects. Only in Cuba, among dictatorships, where Fidel’s revolution apparently still enjoys popular support, does there seem to exist a true citizen’s militia.

      There must be a moral in all this. When I try to think of a nation that has maintained its independence over centuries, and where the citizens still retain their rights as free and independent people; not many come to mind. I think of Switzerland. Of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland. The British Commonwealth. France, Italy. And of our United States.

      When Tell shot the apple from his son’s head, he reserved in hand a second arrow, it may be remembered, for the Austrian tyrant Gessler. And got him too, shortly afterward. Switzerland has been a free country since 1390. In Switzerland basic. national decisions are made by initiative and referendum–direct democracy–and in some cantons by open-air meetings in which all voters participate. Every Swiss male serves a year in the Swiss Army and at the end of the year takes his government rifle home with him–where he keeps it for the rest of his life. One of my father’s grandfathers came from Canton Bern.

      There must be a meaning in this. I don’t think I’m a gun fanatic. I own a couple of small-caliber weapons, but seldom take them off the wall. I gave up deer hunting fifteen years ago, when the hunters began to outnumber the deer. I am a member of the National Rifle Association, but certainly no John Bircher. I’m a liberal–and proud of it. Nevertheless, I am opposed, absolutely, to every move the state makes to restrict my right to buy, own, possess, and carry a firearm. Whether shotgun, rifle, or handgun.
      Of course, we can agree to a few commonsense limitations. Guns should not be sold to children, to the certifiably insane, or to convicted criminals. Other than that, we must regard with extreme suspicion any effort by the government–local, state, or national–to control our right to arms. The registration of firearms is the first step toward confiscation. The confiscation of weapons would be a major and probably fatal step into authoritarian rule–the domination of most of us by a new order of “gentlemen.” By a new and harder oligarchy.

      The tank, the B-52, the fighter-bomber, the state-controlled police and military are the weapons of dictatorship. The rifle is the weapon of democracy. Not for nothing was the revolver called an “equalizer.” Egalite implies liberte. And always will. Let us hope our weapons are never needed–but do not forget what the common people of this nation knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny.

      If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military. The hired servants of our rulers. Only the government–and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws.

    • I do not even see the hidden criminal in this case.
      “Registering guns is crazy,” he said, dissing and dismissing the registration requirements stipulated by the the Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975. ”None of my guns are registered.”
      I would bet his guns are registered in one form or another.

      • I think Mikey was cryptically referring to Zimmerman in Florida, and by extension implying that we’re all potentially criminals just itchin’ to blow away somebody for no good reason. Or something like that. One can rarely ever tell what Mikey is really driving at. I’ve noticed that effete, pseudo-intellectual hipster/progressives often speak in riddles.

        • “I’ve noticed that effete, pseudo-intellectual hipsters often speak in riddles.”

          Greg, I take offense at that, I am definitely not effete.

          I don’t think you’re ALL “potentially criminals just itchin’ to blow away somebody for no good reason,” just some.

        • “Greg, I take offense at that, I am definitely not effete.” ;>) I do appreciate the self deprecation and the humor. However…

          ef·fete/iˈfēt/
          Adjective:

          (of a person) Affected, overrefined, and ineffectual: “effete trendies from art college”.
          No longer capable of effective action.

          Agreed, there are truly some people out there that are just itchin’. Sadly, that’s the state of the human condition. Celebrate diversity!

    • It’s also the advice the late Justice Jackson gave for people stopped for so much as a traffic ticket or disorderly conduct charge. The ability to, within your rights, STFU, is all that preserves your right to a fair trial, should one follow.

  16. It’s a shame that we have to hide the fact we own devices like this. We are considered pre-criminals for having firearms, imminently capable of doing wrong.

  17. I only read the article not anyone’s comments keep it real … The only Gun law I follow is the 2nd admenment it is the only law n the USA that matter .. if u reg u guns u will b The 1st ppl who they come after …. If u not like it get out of my country .. r come take my guns…. With discretion I advise ….

    • I take it that you’re not a native writer, yes?

      “The only Gun law I follow is the 2nd admenment it is the only law n the USA that matter”. Good luck and God’s Speed my friend.

  18. American by Birth and Southern by the Grace of our Lord… no where I have ever lived or anywhere I will ever live requires firearms to be “registered”, does Mass or PA require you to register your Ax’s , Chainsaws, Tire Tools, Hammers??? A Firearm is a tool, not much diffrent from the above mentioned tools. Why anyone who believes in the US Constitution and the right to Keep and Bear Arms would register their tools is beyond my comprehension. What would happen if firearms owner packed up and moved out of the the states that require registration, what effect would it have on the States economy?? I would say that I feel sorry for those in that predictament however since you choose to stay there and allowed this dictator like law to pass in your particular state then I cannot feel anything but apathy… vote it down or get the hell out..

    • I think that if you’ve ever filled out a 4473, you’re in at least one database. If all that you’ve only ever done is FtF transfers, you might just be flying under the radar. But I wouldn’t bet the farm on it.

      “I would say that I feel sorry for those in that predictament however since you choose to stay there and allowed this dictator like law to pass in your particular state then I cannot feel anything but apathy… vote it down or get the hell out..”

      Such a simple solution, how could we have ever overlooked that. “We”, meaning law abiding gun owners, in the more draconian states, didn’t “allow” any of this nonsense to “pass”. In fact, in most cases we’ve fought tooth and claw to prevent them from occurring. You are aware that your simplistic perception of how the legislative process actually works is a little off the mark, aren’t you?

  19. I have no real opinion on the legality, illegality, morality, or immorality of this man’s decision to forego registering his firearms. At the end of the day, “you pays your money and you takes your chance.” That said, I do find the gentleman’s attitude somewhat odd. He seems like a good example of exactly the sort of person who talks himself into prison for no good reason. After all, you can own guns and carry them legally in the DC area — i.e. in northern Virignia!

  20. Just askin’. Doesn’t it depend on your jurisdiction? Here in Texas we don’t register guns. In Nevada, where I once lived, only Las Vegas required registration of handguns, but not in Reno or Tonopah.

  21. There is no registration requirement in Indiana either. I used to live in Illinois. Once you have your FOID card you can buy any legal gun and there is no requirement to register the gun. By the FOID card, they register the gun owner, but not guns. By registration I assume you mean take the guns down to the police station and allow the police to make a record of what you have? I don’t imagine many states require that. I certainly would not do it, even if it was the law.

  22. One person saying “You’ll have to kill me to get me to obey your stupid edicts” is a fool or a suicide.

    One million people saying the same thing is a revolution.

  23. Very few states have state or local “registration” requirements. However, there is a defacto form of registration if a firearm is purchased from a licensed dealer in that every transaction is recorded on the 4473 form. All the BATF has to do is request these forms from a dealer and they have access to every firearm sale done through that store. Admittedly, it would be a huge undertaking, but think of all the “jobs” it could create. I also believe that the background check information is retained in a data base somewhere even though it is supposed to be erased after a specific period of time.

  24. Back in the 1960s I was stationed in Thailand. Private ownership of guns was allowed, including guns of American troops. However, they had to be registered. I had to carry them physically to the police station, where serial numbers were recorded, and a registration number (in Thai) was stamped on each gun. I didn’t like it, but it wasn’t my country. They can run their country as they see fit. America is my country, and I definitely wouldn’t like it here. However, I wouldn’t brag about having a gun with no paper trail. That’s asking for trouble. Those who have them should keep quiet about it.

  25. Do you know where this “prominent conservative TV personality who shall remain nameless” resides? It could very well be that where he lives, he is not required to register his firearms. (As it should be) Or, if he does reside in D.C., if he’s such a prominent TV personality, do you suppose he might have more than one house? Could it be that the residence in D.C. has no firearms (because of the unconstitutional restrictions) and maybe he keeps all his firearms in a safe inside his house in Montana?

    I find your attitude that he should shut up and do as he’s told somewhat repulsive. It reminds me a lot of some of the more spinless black people in the 1960’s who said pretty much the same thing to their brothers and sisters when they started standing up for themselves.

    As a law abiding owner of firearms, I don’t think his actions are causing me to “suffer by association” at all.

  26. As a New Yorker I follow every law to the letter. I can quote chapter and verse of every dumb law that they passed and I follow.

    COBIS recently bit the dust. That did not happen because I broke the law. It happened because I did my small part by joining the NRA as a Lifetime Member, same as my local gun rights organization, and wrote a few well worded letters and emails and encouraged others to do the same . . . use your first so you don’t have to use your second and follow the law. If NY changes the rules on me again. I’m gone and so is my mortgage, and my tax dollars, I’ve had it.

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