Jurisdiction? We Don’t Need No Steenkin’ Jurisdiction

I know, I know. I shouldn’t make ad hominem attacks since they usually indicate that I have nothing substantive to back up my arguments. But Jeez Louise, what is there to say about the mayor of the largest city in the U.S. who thinks the Constitution, state and federal laws don’t apply to him and his minions? We know from his “gun show stings” that sending his Geheime Staatspolizei agents across state lines to commit felonies in support of his anti-Second Amendment agenda is old hat to Hizzoner; so why would anyone believe that he’d respect any sort of jurisdictional boundaries when it comes to sending out his agents to violate the first and fourth amendment rights of New Jerseyites?

Mayor Michael Bloomberg this morning defended the NYPD’s surveillance of Muslims in New Jersey from criticism by Governor Chris Christie and Newark mayor Cory Booker.

Now it could be argued that it’s reasonable for the NYPD to monitor the online activities of Muslims (and note he doesn’t even try to call them suspected terrorists) outside of New York City for plans that potentially threaten Gotham. But for the city to send its agents out of the city to upstate New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut in order to monitor mosques and student groups is beyond the pale.

The antis have been known to accuse us of extremism and paranoia when we point out that a complete disregard of, and disrespect for, the second amendment often indicates a similar attitude for the rest of the Bill of Rights. And Mayor Mike’s actions don’t do much to allay our concerns.

Worse, he’s completely unrepentant for violating the natural, fundamental, and inalienable human, individual, civil, and Constitutional rights[1] to freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and freedom from warrantless searches of these people. I must admit that this fact is not terribly surprising to those of us who have been the target of his bigotry in the past, but it appears to be a rude awakening for his fellow mayors and a few governors as well.

As Hizzoner said in his regular Friday morning fireside chat:

“And also, in the case of I think its Newark, they’ve assigned one of their police officers to work with the NYPD. So, we’ve certainly been keeping them informed … You gotta remember, John, a lot of the World Trade Center terrorists that killed 3,000 people went back and forth to New Jersey, and trained, I think, some of the training was in New Jersey, certainly some of the planning was in Newark, as a matter of fact. And so to say that the NYPD should stop at the border is a bit ridiculous.”

Did you catch that Newark? Send just one officer to work with the NYPD and Mayor Bloomberg believes that gives him carte blanche to violate your sovereignty and the rights of your citizens.

“[T]o say that the NYPD should stop at the border” is not ridiculous Mr. Mayor, it is the law. Remember when Hurricane Katrina hit and Gov. Pataki sent 100 State Troopers to help out? They all had to be sworn in as LSP Special Officers in order to make arrests, use deadly force, enjoy qualified immunity, etc. because they were operating outside their jurisdiction.

Are you familiar with the Federal Bureau of Investigation Mr. Mayor? How about the Department of Homeland Security? They have jurisdiction throughout the country (whether or not that is a good idea is a different rant for a different day); so when you have probable cause or a reasonable articulable suspicion or, hell, even a hunch that there might be a threat that originates from outside your jurisdiction they’re the ones you call.

Okay, I think I’ve jumped on Mayor Bloomberg enough on that particular subject, let’s see what shrieking hysteria comes next in his idiotic, ignorant blather statement:

Christie was not the only governor Bloomberg took issue with.

Governor Robert McDonnell of Virginia signed a repeal this week of a longstanding gun law that forbids an individual from buying more than one handgun a month

I have written a couple of times on the stupidity that is one-gun-a-month, but a quick recap:

1) It was supposed to end or severely restrict trafficking. It didn’t.

B] It was passed 20 years ago, before NICS (again, another rant for another day) and before computerized tracking. Technology has changed, time to change the law.

iii} Much as you’d like, you can’t have it both ways Mr. Mayor. Federal law requires reporting of multiple handgun sales, something which can’t happen with a OGAM law, but something you were all in favor of when it applied to semi-auto rifles in Southwest border states. What was it you said? Oh yeah:

The new program will give law enforcement officers an important new tool to detect and fight illegal trafficking of guns.

So which is it? Do you support giving LEOs the tools they need to detect and fight gun trafficking or not. Or . . . maybe . . . maybe (just spitballin’ here) you don’t really give a $h!t what laws are passed as long as they further restrict rights of people to acquire, keep and bear the most effective self-defense tool in existence.

“The signing came after McDonnell met Saturday with families of people killed or injured in the April 2007 shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, the worst mass shooting in U.S. history,” reported the Washington Post. “The families had hoped to persuade him to veto the bill, although they knew it was a long shot.”

Okay I can’t blame the mayor for that statement because, well, he didn’t say it; but I just can’t let it pass. One more time boys and girls: The VA Tech shooter (whose name I refuse to mention, let him rot in obscurity) fully complied with Virginia’s One Gun A Month law. So the only thing that Tech victims had to offer besides their irrelevance was their victimhood. Oh and complicity in every shooting since VA Tech and any future shootings that take place in a Criminal Empowerment Zone which they are pushing for.

Getting back to the mayor now:

Gambling asked the mayor, who’s made gun control one of his signature issues, his thoughts on McDonnell’s decision.

“In New York City, we find an enormous number of the guns used to shoot and kill people, and shoot and, sadly, every once in a while, kill a cop, have come from Virginia,” said Bloomberg. “And so, you know we have a very big vested interest.

Okay, back the truck up. Hizzoner is saying that Virginia’s OGAM law was so effective that an “enormous” number of crime guns come from . . . Virginia? Hunh? Well, we can straighten this out; the ATF keeps records of that sort of thing, so if we go to their reports page we find out that in 2010, the #1 supplier of “crime guns” to New York state was . . . New York state.

But I thought their laws worked! And what’s this on page 7? The average “time-to-crime” for a gun recovered in New York was . . . that can’t be right, almost 25% higher than the national average? No, 2010 must have been a statistical anomaly; let’s look at 2009. In 2009, New York was again the #1 supplier of crime guns to itself and its gun time-to-crime was 18.5% higher than the national average. Maybe I’d better just do a table:

Year Biggest supplier of “crime guns” % more guns than from VA % Δ in time-to-crime from average
2010 New York 352% +24.8%
2009 New York 411% +18.5%
2008 New York 331% +25.4%
2007 New York 336% +20.0%
2006 New York 337% +18.0%

Well cut my legs off and call me Shorty! Over those 5 years, on average New York state provided itself with 3.5 times as many “crime guns” as Virginia provided.

But getting back to shot cops; the mayor makes the claim that Officer Figoski was shot and killed with a “Virginia gun.” What the mayor conveniently leaves out, however, is that the shooter (you know, the one who actually pulled the trigger and committed the murder) was wanted on a North Carolina warrant (for shooting someone) and had been arrested twice by  the NYPD, the second time in possession of 10 bags of crack and pot. And, despite being told there was an outstanding warrant for him, the judge released him on his own recognizance 37 days before he shot Officer Figoski.

Tell me one more time it was the gun’s fault. But lying by omission and misdirection aren’t the mayor’s only fibs, in the very next line he pulls out a whopper:

Every state I really do believe has the right to have their own gun laws.

Riiiiight! Which is why you support a federal “assault weapons” ban, a federal law requiring a NICS check for every transfer[3], a federal law to close the not-convicted of a damned thing but still a suspected “terrorist loophole”, a federal law requiring a background check on every sales employee (regardless of whether they sell firearms) at any store that sells guns.

And then the mayor finishes up with not just some lies but a complete divorce from reality:

“Virginia’s one of the states where the dealers really do sell more to people without background checks and a lot of those guns wind up on the streets. … But we’ve had four shootings, I think two of the four guns came from Virginia, all four were illegal guns, and one of them killed a police officer, Officer Figoski. He had four daughters he left behind. You know, their father’s never coming home, and it’s time for us to stop this senselessness.”

No, dealers do not sell without background checks. If they did, they’d wind up in prison and on the whole those guns sold by dealers don’t “wind up on the streets”; according to a Bureau of Justice Statistics report, the primary sources of guns used by criminals are friends or family (39.6%) or street/illegal source (39.2%). Only about 12% purchased the weapon from a FFL and less than 2% got them from a gun show or flea market.

And no, the gun didn’t kill Officer Figoski, a multiple criminal offender with an outstanding warrant from another state who was released by YOUR judicial system killed him.

And yes it is time and past time to end the senselessness of blaming inanimate objects for causing crime and killing people, time and past time to end the senseless revolving courtroom door for violent criminals, and past time to end the senseless denial of the natural, fundamental, and inalienable human, individual, civil, and Constitutional right to own and carry the weapon of your choice.[4]

We’ve tried your way Mr. Mayor and it doesn’t work.



[3] The federal bill they are pushing does indeed say “transfer” not sale. So if someone comes up to me at a gun show and says “Are you selling that rifle, can I take a look” the moment I hand it to him I have committed a felony.

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About Bruce W. Krafft

I am a bit of a Johnny-come-lately to the civil rights (firearms flavor) movement, having not really gotten involved until after I hit 40. I am not really a "gun guy"; I can generally hit what I aim at, but I'm not a competitive shooter. I enjoy the craftsmanship of a fine pistol or rifle, but I am not particularly knowledgeable about firearms in general nor am I a Glock guy, or 1911 guy, I'm just a guy. What I am is passionate about civil rights, especially those of the firearm flavor.

26 Responses to Jurisdiction? We Don’t Need No Steenkin’ Jurisdiction

  1. avatarJoe Zip says:

    Someone needs to put that asshat Bloomberg in his place and let him know all these things his is doing (with his own army the NYPD) are wrong and illegal. He is acting like he is the head of a federal agency, he should be thrown in jail. I cant wait until his term is over and he becomes irrelevant.

  2. avatarMike OFWG says:

    What can anyone say? Bloomberg spouts ideological nonsense and the media continues to print it. The trouble is, he brazenly breaks Federal and State laws with impunity. Not setting a good example for us peons.

  3. avatarNCG says:

    Glad to hear the NYPD’s completely abusive and unconstitutional activities vis-a-vis Muslims brought to light in this generally right-of-center forum. Just as people on the left too often ignore abuses of the Second Amendment, some authoritarians on the right ignore abuses of the Fourth amendment, as long as those abuses are targeted toward some “other,” often a religious, ethnic, or lefty political minority. Of course, when DHS was profiling right-wingers as potential domestic terrorists, all Hell broke loose, and rightly so. The rights of people you don’t particularly like matter just as much as yours do, regardless of your political stripe.

    The NYPD engaged in some of this illegal spying with the help of the CIA:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/story/2011-12-23/cia-nypd-partnership/52198856/1

  4. avatarRalph says:

    The rights of people you don’t particularly like

    Who’s this “you” you’re referring to? If you are going to point a finger at someone, point a finger at him instead of giving the finger to us, okay?

    • avatarNCG says:

      You’re right, Ralph, I should have said “we” and “ours,” that was absolutely the intent of the comment, we should ALL care about the rights of everybody, even people we don’t like and don’t agree with.

      So, who is this “us” to whom I’m giving the finger…:)

  5. avatarRalph says:

    Mayor Blameberg thinks he’s doing a scene from The Matrix: “You give me that “juris-my-dick-tion” crap… you can cram it up your ass.”

  6. avatarJavier says:

    His horror Mr. Bloomberg is a megalomaniac.

  7. avatarbontai Joe says:

    Bloomberg really REALLY makes me miss Giulliani

  8. avatarMark N. says:

    It could be worse. Imagine what it would be like if he was appointed to head the DHS.

    • avatarJoe Zip says:

      If he was head of DHS Bloomberg would make the USA look like Nazi Germany did between June 30 and July 2, 1934.

  9. avatarMatt in FL says:

    I don’t understand the point about New York’s time to crime being greater than the average. I understand what the raw numbers mean, I just don’t understand why it being higher than average is a bad thing, or how it reinforces your argument.

    Can someone give me a hand?

    • avatarMadDawg J says:

      IMHO the time to crime stat points towards if the gun was bought for use in a crime, or if it was bought for legitimate proposes and eventually found its way into a crime.

    • avatarDerek says:

      ^^^
      This.
      A short ‘time-to-crime”, generally, indicates a straw purchase or some other trafficking scheme. There’s a rule of thumb for the amount of time that represents the likelihood of a trafficked/not trafficked gun but I can’t remember precisely what it is.

      Having a long ‘time-to-crime’ means that most of the “crime guns” recovered in NYC weren’t trafficked/straw purchased from anywhere, let alone Virginia. They were bought legitemately and later on, probably after changing hands a dozen times, they were picked up by a criminal and used in a crime.

      Ultimately, it means that criminals aren’t getting their guns from FFLs.

  10. avatarUSMCVeteran says:

    Like I’ve said before, dossiers need to be kept on tyrants and criminals, like Mikey Bloomberg, who continue their assault on the Constitution. People like Mikey are pure scum and why the people of New York city continue to vote this clown back into office is beyond my comprehension.

    • avatarRalph says:

      Mike Bloomberg is the original mikeb. The 30200 is the amount of cash he carries in his wallet.

  11. avatarDirk Diggler says:

    funny that the midget has no problem having people with guns around him, as long as they work for and are supposed to protect him only. #bastardmidget

  12. avatarSilver says:

    If there was any true justice in this country, Bloomberg would be put up against a wall and shot like any person in power who tries to traitorously subvert the Constitution.

  13. avatarJohnT says:

    To try to respond to Matt’s question, as I understand it, a shorter time to crime indicates a greater likelihood that the guns were being illegally trafficked. A longer time to crime indicates a lower likelihood that the guns recovered were illegally trafficked into the state in question. Since New York state’s average time to crime is on the order of 13 years, while the Bureau of Justice data say the national average time to crime is 10 and a fraction years, the data would tend to indicate that the likelihood that the crime guns recovered in New York were illegally trafficked into the state is pretty low. Hence, the data tend to undermine Bloomberg’s claims. So a longer time to crime is not a bad thing, unless you’re trying to sell Bloomberg’s snake oil.

    • avatarRopingdown says:

      With NYPD cops smuggling in full-auto M-16′s, one assumes they have an express service for Glocks and Sigs, too. Once Reuters failed to deliver on the Bloomberg Terminal service, he had a monopoly with a 25,000 a year rental fee. That could go to a guy’s head. Apparently it has. And this “I have my own Army” stuff is too over-the-top for words.

  14. avatarAPBTFan says:

    Funny thing is if everybody involved quit effin’ around chasing rainbows and slammed down hard on recidivist criminals (especially those who use guns) who have been more than proven to be the the cause of the majority of violent crime we’d see a huge drop in said violent crime. Fortunately by the grace of the spreading Castle Doctrine we the people are weeding out the recidivists ourselves.

    The sum of Bloomberg’s life consists of getting his rocks off throwing his weight around and since criminals patently give him and his laws the finger it leaves only the law abiding, of many states no less, to bear the brunt of his sorry ass god complex.

    • avatarRopingdown says:

      Yep. They’re charging us the big bucks but making us do the actual work.

    • avatarBruce W. Krafft says:

      Fan, why especially those criminals who use guns? Are guns more inherently evil than knives? Is shooting someone worse than hacking the to death with a pick-axe or pitchfork?
      We have to be careful not to let the “accepted wisdom” of society slip in under our radar. For years guns have been demonized and “gun criminals” treated as if they were somehow worse than others, but a criminal is a criminal; if someone mugs me does it matter if he used a gun or a knife or a piece of rebar?

  15. avatarTom says:

    But for the city to send its agents out of the city to upstate New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut in order to monitor mosques and student groups is beyond the pale.

    Sort of amazed the other States tolerate him messing around in their jurisdiction.

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