Silencer Review: AAC Ti-RANT 9 (9mm)

I don’t think there’s a more ubiquitous and well loved pistol round than the 9mm. Sure .22lr is great for plinking, but it’s so dirty and underpowered for home defense that you may as well be lobbing spitwads at the bad guys. Whether you’re looking for something to make your range time a little quieter or to protect your hearing on your nightstand gun, Advanced Armament Corp. thinks they have the perfect accessory: their Ti-RANT 9.

As a preface, I just wanted to emphasize that this is not a “full” review of this product. Here at TTAG we usually reserve judgment until we’ve put a couple hundred rounds through something and tried it out in different conditions. Unfortunately the BATFE here in the U.S. prevents us from getting our hands on silencers for protracted testing unless we go through months of waiting, spend $200 per transfer, and live in certain states. It’s impractical. Luckily I recently had a chance to visit the Advanced Armament Corp. factory and test all of their cans under their supervision. While the tests may not have been as complete as I want, they were good enough for a brief review.

The Ti-RANT 9 was designed to be used on semi-automatic pistols, such as the SIG SAUER P226 shown in the background above. As such it needed to be strong enough to contain the expanding gases, which necessitated a chunkier design. This silencer was not intended to completely disassemble for cleaning, unlike its rimfire counterparts. Which is fine, because it doesn’t really require as much cleaning. 9mm, while still a fairly dirty round, is a lot more efficient and leaves behind far less residue than .22lr.

Unlike the rifle silencers, this can does in fact come apart partially (and completely if you don’t mind getting dirty – see comments for more information). One of the features of this silencer is the A.S.A.P. system, which is an acronym I can’t remember (nor is it very important)  but describes their method of allowing the pistol to cycle. Semi-automatic pistols, from JMB’s 1911 to the modern M&P 9, require the barrel to move back slightly during the firing of the gun. As the barrel moves backwards it imparts some momentum to the slide which completes the cycling process. If the barrel isn’t allowed to recoil, then the pistol will not cycle. Using some springs and gubbins (pictured below) the barrel is allowed to partially recoil while still maintaining the position of the silencer and allowing the bullet to leave the can unhindered.

This A.S.A.P. system, according to the manual, should be thoroughly cleaned using Scotch-Brite. Yes, it specifically indicates Scotch-Brite and forbids the use of any other material.

One of the more interesting features of these silencers (the Ti-RANT series) is that they function both “dry” and “wet.” This means that you can either fire them as-is, or put about 10cc of water inside the silencer to make it even quieter. I think this is best illustrated through the wonders of YouTube…

The tube works great as-is, and works even better when it’s wet. Avoiding the sexual double entendre of that phrase the Ti-RANT 9 has a couple more tricks up its sleeve.

Any time you put something on the end of your muzzle you’re going to change the characteristics of the gun. Specifically, with this can there can be some point of impact shift between silenced and unsilenced operation. With the A.S.A.P. system, the shooter has some ability to shift the point of impact by rotating the position of the silencer. I did not see it in action, so unfortunately I can only report on its magical abilities as described by AAC.

If you ask AAC really nicely (and send them a few dollars) they will give you a “fixed” spacer for your silencer. The A.S.A.P. system works great for pistols, but if you have something with a fixed barrel that doesn’t need to reciprocate then the A.S.A.P. system is going to beat both itself and your muzzle to death. Which would suck. A fixed spacer deactivates the A.S.A.P. system and keeps the silencer steady on the barrel.

What kind of firearm would require a 9mm silencer and have a fixed barrel? Only the most awesome kind, of course. Like this Marlin 1894C in .38 special.

The AAC Ti-RANT 9 is a great silencer for 9mm (and .38 special) firearms. It works wonderfully on semi-automatic pistols and is easily converted for use on rifles, whether they be 9mm AR-15 conversions or funky custom threaded Marlin lever action rifles. It’s sound suppression qualities are almost unbelievable for its size and price. In short, where do I send my check for one?

Ti-RANT 9 – 9mm Silencer
Length: 5.25″
Weight: 8.6oz
Diameter: 1.38″
Sound Reduction: 35 — 38 dB (dry/wet)
MSRP: $850

Ratings (out of 5): 

Sound Suppression: * * * * (*)
I’ve fired a few 9mm silencers, and I can safely say this is one of the most quiet I’ve ever heard. Add in some of the “patented secret silencer fluid” and it gets even quieter. The sound of the action cycling was the single loudest sound I heard, and that’s using supersonic ammunition.

Build Quality: * * * * *
After handling the rimfire silencers this one feels a lot more “solid.” There’s a heft to it that screams “well built and over engineered,” much like the satisfying ‘thump’ you feel when closing the door of a quality automobile. And while it’s certainly heavier than the rimfire stuff, it’s still light enough to not be all that noticeable when attached to the pistol or rifle of choice.

Ease of Use: * * *
That A.S.A.P. system looks like a bitch and a half to clean, and the reason that I dropped a couple of stars. Plus, threading the thing onto your pistol takes some rearwards pressure (which I couldn’t figure out on my own). Other than that it’s easy as pie to use.

Overall Rating: * * * *
A solid silencer at a good price. What more are you looking for?

(Pictures courtesy Advanced Armament Co.)

Click here for the user’s manual.