Press release:

Available now from Wilson Combat – The 7.62×40 WT (Wilson Tactical) is an all new powerful .30 caliber cartridge solution for the standard AR-15 rifle platform that is inherently accurate, low recoil and only requires one unique part – a new barrel. The 7.62×40 WT works with all other standard pattern 5.56 AR components and is completely reliable with the new Lancer® L5 AWM magazines as modified by Wilson Combat.

Ideal for Hunting and Tactical Use

The wide range of available .30 caliber hunting bullets makes the 7.62×40 WT an ideal choice for hunting of medium to large size game with the downrange ballistic performance only a .30 Caliber projectile can deliver. Experienced shooters will be pleased by the match grade accuracy and terminal effectiveness and energy easily exceeding the 7.62×39 Russian, while novice shooters will appreciate the mild recoil and low report.

Tactical shooters looking for a hard hitting, fast handling, practical .30 Caliber AR-15 service carbine will find the 7.62×40 WT a viable alternative to the 5.56×45 for self defense and law enforcement applications. With 18/19 or 28/29 round capacity using Wilson Combat modified Lancer® L5 AWM 5.56 magazines, maximum firepower is retained.

Components, Loaded Ammunition and Complete Guns

The 7.62×40 WT cartridge is based on a standard Lake City 5.56×45 NATO/.223 cartridge case that goes through a simple shortening and reforming operation to achieve appropriate cartridge dimensions. Wilson Combat has reloading dies, case gages, cartridge cases, handload data and a variety of loaded ammunition to fully support this caliber.

A complete lineup of Wilson Combat 7.62×40 WT rifles, uppers and match-grade barrels are also available now.

Ballistic Performance Comparison

7.62×40 WT (16” Barrel)
110 gr: 2450 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1466 Foot Pounds of Energy
125 gr: 2400 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1599 Foot Pounds of Energy
150 gr: 2200 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1612 Foot Pounds of Energy

5.56 Nato (16” Barrel)
55 gr: 3150 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1212 Foot Pounds of Energy
62 gr: 3000 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1239 Foot Pounds of Energy
77 gr: 2750 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1293 Foot Pounds of Energy

7.62×39 (16” Barrel)
123 gr: 2320 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1470 Foot Pounds of Energy

6.8 SPC (16” Barrel)
110 gr: 2550 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1594 Foot Pounds of Energy

300 BLACKOUT (16” Barrel)
125 gr: 2275 FPS Muzzle Velocity and 1436 Foot Pounds of Energy

NOTE for Handloaders: Once a 7.62×40 WT case has been fired once it will be fire- formed and provide approximately 1 gr. additional powder capacity and the potential for approximately 25-50 FPS more velocity at comparable pressure levels.

Trajectory and Remaining Velocity

125 gr. Nosler Ballistic Hunter, 2375 FPS MV, Zero range 175 yards
100 yds +1.7” 2156 FPS
150 yds +1.1” 2052 FPS
200 yds -1.6” 1951 FPS
250 yds -6.6” 1854 FPS

11 Responses to Wilson Combat Debuts New 7.62×40 WT Cartridge, Barrel, Rifles

  1. Yawn. The ‘shoehorn every other caliber into an AR-15′ trend is getting a little worn to me, especially this lackluster addition to an already saturated market. .300BLK got the .30 cal AR offering right, taking up the same space in a STANAG magazine as 5.56, while maintaining the 30 round capacity and 5.56 bolt face.

    Meanwhile over at Wilson, they require a proprietary magazine. Also, .300BLK is optimized for *both* subsonic and supersonic velocities. This, to me, is just laziness in engineering on the part of Wilson Combat.

  2. Civilian shooters already have the 6.5 Grendel, 6.8 SPC, .264 LBC-AR and I don’t know how many other “new” cartridges to complement the /223, .308 and other hunting rounds. And why do we want the 7.62X40 WT? IMO, if a shooter or hunter can’t hit it or kill it with either the 5.56 or 7.62 Nato, or any of the superb hunting rounds that are designed for the long range execution of big game, it’s time to give up and go home. Unless we accept that an SD shooter will need to make a 500-yard head shot.

    • I’m with you. (stay tuned for hyperbole) I could handload some crazy wildcat that was as light as 5.56 and hotter than 7.62×39, but so what? Unless it gets adopted by a major military power it will always be too expensive to practice with.

  3. Great performance, obscure high priced caliber,,,,,going to be hard to find for those that don’t reload.

    Right up there with the 10mm, and the .41 Magnum…. Great Wildcat rounds. Not much practicality. Especially, if our Anointed POTUS, has his way, and between materials and fuel, ammo is only going up anyway.

    Great for the eclectic AR guy with $$$, I suppose.

  4. It has to be an April Fools joke.

    Between the menu of big-bore AR calibers and the 6.8/7.62 AR calibers, there are way too many options and no one (consumers or manufacturers) is throwing any serious momentum behind any of them except the 6.8, and only modestly for that.

  5. Just neck this 7.62×40 down to 7mm and be done with it. All you would need is the same barrel change but it would be much flater shooting.

    Then to get it to sell to the military just donate $10million to the Democrats for Obama….. Or maybe G.E.

  6. Why???
    My .308 & .223 AR’s are more versatile than this off the wall cartridge. This AR isn’t for me but I’m sure it’ll turn some peoples crank…but not many.

  7. When I saw Wilson Combat post this on facebook my eyes started playing tricks on me. All I could see was, $$$$$$$$$$. Maybe I shouldn’t assume, but I don’t think I will be making an — out of you or me for assuming that.

    I will say that the subsonic characteristics of the 300 BLK and the easy integration to current AR Platforms has me interested. Everything takes time, but if it really catches on with the suppressor crowd, and it gets produced in affordable bulk quantities for the non-subsonic I think it could take off. It is all about making it affordable.

    The 300 BLK could also take off because it has the Freedom Group backing it.

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