Ruger SR40 Returns with Galloway Precision Trigger

To cure the Ruger SR40’s abominable trigger, TTAG’s gun doctor prescribed some surgery from Ruger specialists Galloway Precision. I’ll be giving his bag o’ tricks a full review in a subsequent post. (RI has a seven-day cooling off period that includes transfers). Suffice it to say, the bitch bit me! Again! [see: above] On the positive side, theSR40’s modified trigger now feels just as good—if not better—than the SR9c’s. There’s hardly any take up, no stacking, and a crisp, clean, predictable break. Why Ruger doesn’t ship the SR40 from the factory like that I have no idea. Something to do with money? On the positive side, the SR40’s lousy trigger keeps expert gunsmiths like Eric Galloway in business.

comments

  1. avatar William Ratajczyk says:

    On the positive side, the SR40′s lousy trigger keeps expert gunsmiths like Eric Galloway in business.

    That said, imagine what the world would be like if everyone had to take their new cars in to their mechanic immediately upon delivery to adjust the fuel delivery parameters.

    1. avatar mini says:

      They do! Swapping to an aftermarket air intake and filter on my car boosted the horsepower 6% simply by smoothing out the passage and increasing the filter size. Playing around with the electronics on modern engines can boost the performance hugely. (although, perhaps at the cost of increased wear).

      Modern car companies are sometimes trying to improve fuel economy, but often they just want to save money. Maybe "reaching a better price point" is a better way to say it.

      1. avatar William Ratajczyk says:

        I don't doubt that manufacturers hold back on optimizing their vehicles' performance in one area or another (how else would they so easily introduce "improvements" in subsequent model years?). My intended point was more that fuel delivery systems in modern production automobiles are at least refined enough to allow for smooth running under a very wide variety of operating environments right out the door. That frequently isn't the case with firearms.

        1. avatar mini says:

          I gotcha. In my mind "chips" were part of fuel delivery, but your point is a good one.

          I wonder if firearms makers are simply saving money by focusing on key attributes. "Trigger feel, molding marks, overly stiff magazine springs? Who cares as long as we can hit reliability and an edge over competition!" I certainly hope that's not the case, but economics rule most industries. Maybe buyer and seller priorities are just different.

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