We’re beginning to form a picture of the police’s attitude towards armed citizens. Yesterday, the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department of Spanaway Washington said police had the right to stop and interrogate Open Carry advocates on general principle. Before that, Open Carry practitioner Joshua R. Watson was arrested outside a restaurant—for being outside a restaurant. Our sources tell us the complaining witnesses had conflicting stories; the cops coerced their testimony. TTAG writer Chris Dumm is busy defending another Open Carry case in his little corner of the Evergreen State. The Wisconsin Five are in play. Meanwhile, here’s a story where a Minnesota cop who endangers public safety with his lack of due care and attention to his firearm, and that’s OK . . .

A Blaine police officer who was on duty in St. Paul had his gun, badge and ID card stolen from an unmarked police car Friday — and the gun remains missing, authorities say.

The theft occurred between 10:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. near the intersection of Chestnut and Exchange streets on the southwest edge of downtown.

On Monday, St. Paul police recovered the officer’s ID card, badge and assorted paperwork near the scene of the crime, but the search continues for the weapon. Local, state and federal authorities have been alerted to the theft, Blaine Police Chief Chris Olson said in a news release Monday.

According to the release, the officer indicated he had locked his car using a keyless remote.

In an interview Monday night, Olson said that “in general, we expect officers to have their equipment with them” while on duty.

Asked whether the officer might face disciplinary action for leaving the gun and badge in his car, the chief said: “Something was taken from us, and it’s an illegal act. That’s our only concern right now.”

We can deduce from this startribune.com story that the police department’s primary concern is NOT the danger that the weapon poses to the public or the officer’s abrogation of his responsibilities. It’s the fact that someone stole from the police.

Maybe I’m splitting hairs here, but if the police don’t set the standard for responsible gun ownership (the city of Blaine owns the stolen gun), how can they presume to presume that legal gun owners are doing something irresponsible?

And if the police don’t set the standard for safe gun storage and handling, and make their officers accountable for their actions in the regard, how can they presume to hassle a private gun owner for their theoretical failures?

One Response to Irresponsible Gun Owner of the Day: Blaine, MN Police Department

  1. "Maybe I’m splitting hairs here, but if the police don’t set the standard for responsible gun ownership (the city of Blaine owns the stolen gun), how can they presume to presume that legal gun owners are doing something irresponsible? And if the police don’t set the standard for safe gun storage and handling, and make their officers accountable for their actions in the regard, how can they presume to hassle a private gun owner for their theoretical failures?"

    You're not splitting hairs at all. Those are good questions that deserve answers.

    This is just more proof that police don't prevent crimes, they investigate them after the fact. Where were the cops to prevent the auto break in and theft?? What are the odds that weapon is used in a crime before it's recovered?

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