An Ohio court has sentenced Cleveland Browns Defensive Tackle Shaun Rogers to a 12-month “diversion program.” The judgement is a plea deal relating to Rogers’ April arrest for carrying a loaded .45 in his carry-on. D’oh! Roger’s wrist slap includes a 10-hour weapons course and 40 hours of community service. TEN HOURS? What can you teach someone about gun safety in ten hours that you can’t teach them in ten minutes? Treat all guns as loaded. Always point the muzzle in a safe direction. Don’t put your finger on the trigger until you’re ready to destroy your target. Um . . . I know! What are the only two places for your handgun. Mr. Rogers?

On your hip or in a safe.

I don’t know if the NFL DT finished the 12 hours of instruction required for an Ohio CCW permit and received same. I somehow doubt it.

If Rogers didn’t get a concealed carry license, he should have been facing a stiffer sentence than mere classroom boredom and community service. Here’s the relevant Ohio law code for carrying a concealed weapon:

F)(1) Whoever violates this section is guilty of carrying concealed weapons. Except as otherwise provided in this division or division (F)(2) of this section, carrying concealed weapons in violation of division (A) of this section is a misdemeanor of the first degree. Except as otherwise provided in this division or division (F)(2) of this section, if the offender previously has been convicted of a violation of this section or of any offense of violence, if the weapon involved is a firearm that is either loaded or for which the offender has ammunition ready at hand, or if the weapon involved is dangerous ordnance, carrying concealed weapons in violation of division (A) of this section is a felony of the fourth degree. Except as otherwise provided in division (F)(2) of this section, if the offense is committed aboard an aircraft, or with purpose to carry a concealed weapon aboard an aircraft, regardless of the weapon involved, carrying concealed weapons in violation of division (A) of this section is a felony of the third degree.

Let’s say Rogers did have a licence to carry. He’d still be up shit creek for possessing a concealed weapon with the purpose of carrying it aboard an aircraft. Ignorance is no excuse under the law. Unless you’re a pro football player. Apparently.

In any case (so to speak), if Rogers had a CCW, he should have been carrying his gun on his person or left it in a locked container.

There are middle linebackers but there is no “middle way” when it comes to packing heat. Either it’s in your direct control and ready to use (i.e. holstered) or it’s locked up. On or off.

Ignore this simple safety rule and bad things are bound to happen. If you think this is the first time someone left, lost or misplaced a bag with a gun in it, then you’ll believe that the Browns have both won and hosted a Super Bowl.

There’s only time you can really forget about your gun or guns: when they’re locked in a safe. Even then, I wouldn’t walk it down to condition white. I’m always wary of who’s in my house, who might want to come into my house and whether or not they’re thinking “What’s in your Browning?”

But I’m always sure my firearms are exactly where they need to be.

I have no idea why people don’t wear their handgun in a holster when they’re at home. I repeat: a holster’s the best place for a home defense pistol. If you need your handgun at home, you need it fast. And there it is. On your hip.

If you don’t need it, or if you’re unable to look after it because you’re asleep or chemically incapacitated, lock it up. The rule’s so easy even an NFL football player can understand it.  In ten hours or less.

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