Why Are Guns On Trains So Hard to Understand?

Terrorists and spree killers. Who needs ’em? No one. Who stops them? Law enforcement officers, of course. And when they don’t? People with guns. Not always, but sometimes. And yes, that includes bombs; armed Israeli citizens have shot terrorist bombers on a number of occasions. For some reason, the idea that an armed populace is bulwark against terrorists and homicidal maniacs just can’t find favor amongst the Powers That Be—who have their own selfish reasons for opposing homie homeland security. Check it: “While terrorists can employ many tactics, overwhelming historical evidence indicates that terrorist attacks on surface transportation will likely occur in (3) forms: Use of improvised explosive devices on a trains, use of an IED at a station, [or an] emerging threat as an active shooter.” So how does that argument by Amtrak Police Chief John O’Connor exclude the right to carry a legal firearm on a train? It doesn’t. But that doesn’t stop the choo-choo train’s top cop from doing what execs at state-subsidized anything do best: lobby for funding . . .

Making matters worse for the fiscally challenged rail service is the lack of additional funding to implement a gun-stowing plan, which would require special screening for passengers who wish to store guns on board.

“There is no pot of money that comes with this bill,” said Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm.  “But we will find the money somewhere and we are on schedule to deliver a plan.”

Kulm said he didn’t know how much the program will cost Amtrak.’

It’s the same old song [via rawstory.com]. Hang on; does this mean that stowed guns will be good to go while concealed carry or carry-on weapons must be stowed? Seems that way.

Sen. Wicker, who received an “A” rating from the National Rifle Association, has been adamant in arguing that the second amendment should apply to Amtrak passengers.

“Americans should not have their Second Amendment rights restricted for any reason, particularly if they choose to travel on America’s federally subsidized rail line,” Wicker said at the time the amendment was passed, according to the National Rifle Association web site.

“Sportsmen who would like to use an Amtrak train for hunting trips cannot do so because they are not allowed to bring a firearm in checked luggage, something that is done every day at airports across our country,” he added.

Which brings us full circle, to the start of this piece. Why shouldn’t we let legal gun owners bring—as in carry—guns on trains? Wouldn’t that be a good thing?

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