National Shooting Sports Foundation Seeks to Disarm Members

That’s MISTER sensationalistic headline to you. Sill, what are we to make of this statement from the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF): “Children across the country will start their summer vacations this month and, as a result, spend more time at home — some of it unsupervised. With that in mind, the National Shooting Sports Foundation reminds gun owners to review their procedures for safely storing firearms in the home — a reminder in keeping with June being National Safety Month. A few simple steps — such as storing firearms unloaded with ammunition stored separately under lock and key — can help prevent an accident.” Yes, well, anyone schooled in the art of home defense—a practice aimed at protecting those self-same children from harm—knows that storing a home defense gun (or guns) and ammo separately is a recipe for non-readiness . . .

A better plan: keep home defense guns locked-up and loaded and fully educate your children as to the dangers of guns. Including their whereabouts. That said, the NSSF is all about giving children firearms safety instruction. But this “divide your ammo and gun” press release represents their official storage policy. [download NSSF safety brochure here]

ALWAYS make absolutely sure that firearms in your home are securely stored out of the reach of children. Unloaded firearms can be secured with a firearm locking device to make them inoperable. Unloaded firearms also can be stored in a locked cabinet, safe, firearm vault or storage case.

ALWAYS store ammunition in a locked location separate from firearms and out of the reach of children.

ALWAYS make absolutely sure that firearms in your home are securely stored out of the reach of children. Unloaded firearms can be secured with a firearm locking device to make them inoperable. Unloaded firearms also can be stored in a locked cabinet, safe, firearm vault or storage case.

ALWAYS store ammunition in a locked location separate from firearms and out of the reach of children.

The NSSF knows full well that the number of negligent discharges that wound or kill children is minuscule as a percentage of American households with guns. While the NSSF advice above is PC, it’s simply not realistic—as many of the org’s members know. The gun rights group should consider re-focusing its safety efforts where they would do most good: by amping-up awareness. Recommending a safety practice that its members are not likely to follow—for good reason—is an inherently flawed, self-defeating strategy.

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