Illinois Launches Pre-McDonald Gun Control Bill Blitz

Sometime this summer, The U.S. Supreme Court will strike down Chicago’s handgun ban. While the Highest Court in the Land’s™ ruling on the McDonald v. Chicago case will likely leave a bit of wiggle room for state and local firearms restrictions, The Windy City’s gun control laws will have the wind knocked out of their sails (leading to lots of gun sales). In the run up to that event, prior to the legislature’s May 7th HFTH (Head For The Hills) deadline, the Illinois state legislature is trying to ram through as much gun control legislation as it can. To wit (provided and summarized by the duh duh DUH National Rifle Association):

House Bill 180, introduced by State Representative Deborah Graham (D-78), would establish a state-based licensing scheme for Federal Firearms License (FFL) holders that sell handguns.

House Bill 5480, introduced by State Representative Harry Osterman (D-14), would outlaw most private transfers of handguns and require the transfers to be processed through an FFL.

House Bill 5495, introduced by State Representative William Burns (D-26), would prohibit law-abiding citizens from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period.

House Bill 5751, introduced by State Representative Edward Acevedo (D-2), was voted out of the House Executive Committee this week, and is now on the floor. This bill if passed would ban countless semi-automatic handguns, rifles, and shotguns, many parts for the same, as well as .50 cal. rifles and ammunition.

House Bill 5849, introduced by State Representative Harry Osterman (D-14), would overturn last year’s Illinois Supreme Court ruling that held the storage boxes built into vehicles qualified for storing unloaded firearms for lawful transportation under Illinois law. This bill would change the law to make it more difficult to lawfully transport unloaded firearms.

House Bill 6123, introduced by State Representative Osterman (D-14), would create a confusing new felony offense for “knowingly” supplying a “street gang member” with a firearm. A “street gang member” is defined in the Illinois Streetgang Terrorism Omnibus Prevention Act. This legislation is undoubtedly intended to capitalize on the fears the general public has for words like “street gang” and “terrorism.”